Journal of Clinical Virology assembles papers on HIV diagnostic testing algorithms

December 22, 2011

London, December 22, 2011 - Elsevier's Journal of Clinical Virology in collaboration with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) today announced the publication of a special supplement entitled 'Update on HIV Diagnostic Testing Algorithms'. This timely supplement contains articles which summarize studies since the 2010 US HIV Diagnostics Conference validating the proposed new US HIV diagnostic testing algorithm. In addition, review articles and original research related to the topic of HIV diagnosis and viral load monitoring are included.

Dr. Bernard Branson, Associate Director for Laboratory Diagnostics, CDC-Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention said, "The Journal of Clinical Virology supplement assembles, in one place, the most important research papers validating the performance of the new diagnostic algorithm for HIV testing. This performance validation represents one of the most significant developments in HIV diagnostics since CDC first recommended the Western blot for supplemental testing 22 years ago. We especially appreciate the efforts by the publisher and editors of the Journal of Clinical Virology, as an important service to public health, in making this supplement freely accessible to all at http://www.Journalofclinicalvirology.com."
-end-
The Journal of Clinical Virology is edited by Dr. William Carman and Dr. Christine Ginocchio; the supplement was guest edited by Dr. Max Q. Arens, published as Volume 52, Supplement 1, (December 2011).

Notes for editors

The full table of contents for the supplement is available to credentialed journalists upon request, as are individual articles, contact newsroom@elsevier.com.

For journalists wishing to interview the authors:

CDC National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention News Media Team
404-639-8895
NCHHSTPMediaTeam@cdc.gov

BIO-RAD Laboratories
Tina Cuccia, Corporate Communications Manager
510-741-6063

Roche
Bryan R. Cobb, Ph.D., F.A.C.M.G. Director, Scientific Affairs
bryan.cobb@roche.com

About the Journal of Clinical Virology

The Journal of Clinical Virology is affiliated to the European Society for Clinical Virology and the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology. It is an international journal publishing papers on any aspect of human virology that directly pertains to virus-induced clinical conditions. Articles from any field of virological study will be considered if the article is relevant to the understanding or manipulation of a disease state.

The Journal of Clinical Virology, with an Impact Factor of 4.023, is ranked 7th out of 33 Virology titles according to the 2010 Journal Citation Reports® published by Thomson Reuters.

About Elsevier

Elsevier is a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services. The company works in partnership with the global science and health communities to publish more than 2,000 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and close to 20,000 book titles, including major reference works from Mosby and Saunders. Elsevier's online solutions include SciVerse ScienceDirect, SciVerse Scopus, Reaxys, MD Consult and Nursing Consult, which enhance the productivity of science and health professionals, and the SciVal suite and MEDai's Pinpoint Review, which help research and health care institutions deliver better outcomes more cost-effectively.

A global business headquartered in Amsterdam, Elsevier employs 7,000 people worldwide. The company is part of Reed Elsevier Group plc, a world-leading publisher and information provider, which is jointly owned by Reed Elsevier PLC and Reed Elsevier NV; the combined market capitalization of the two parent companies is approximately £12bn/€13bn. The ticker symbols are REN (Euronext Amsterdam), REL (London Stock Exchange), RUK and ENL (New York Stock Exchange).

Media contact

Fiona Macnab
Elsevier
44-20-7424-4259
f.macnab@elsevier.com

Elsevier

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