American Society for Microbiology publication provides guidance for shipping biological agents

December 23, 2003

WASHINGTON, DC - December 22, 2003 -- The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) announces the release of a new publication designed to help scientists understand and comply with the rules and regulations governing the shipment of biological and infectious substances.

Laboratory workers responsible for the shipment of dangerous pathogens and toxins by land or air carriers are required to comply with detailed and sometimes confusing national and international transport regulations. Cumitech 40: Packing and Shipping of Diagnostic Specimens and Infectious Substances summarizes the most recent regulations and provides guidelines for shipment.

Published by ASM Press, Cumitechs (Cumulative Techniques and Procedures in Clinical Microbiology) are consensus reports in booklet form on topics of special interest to clinical microbiology laboratories. Experts cover the optimal procedures for a variety of clinical microbiology techniques. Each Cumitech focuses on a particular diagnostic concern, laboratory technique, or infectious agent and attempts to consolidate, in authoritative, brief, and practical form, the latest that is known on each subject.

Cumitech 40 covers specific topics such as terminology, classification and naming of diagnostic specimens, marking and labeling of packages, packing material, documentation and training of personnel. It also includes practical suggestions and checklists for preparation of specimens.

The 16-page publication is available for $19.95 and can be ordered from ASM Press online at www.asmpress.org or by phone at 1-800-546-2416 (continental U.S. and Canada) or 703-661-1593 (all other locations).
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The American Society for Microbiology is the largest single life science society, composed of over 42,000 scientists and health professionals. Its mission is to promote research and research training in the microbiological sciences and to assist communication between scientists, policy makers, and the public to improve health, the environment, and economic well-being.

American Society for Microbiology

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