Cleveland Clinic researchers honored for contributions to science

December 23, 2011

Tuesday, December 27, 2011, Cleveland: Cleveland Clinic researchers Bruce Lamb, Ph.D., and Xiaoxia Li, Ph.D., were recently named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers.

This year 539 members have been awarded this honor by AAAS because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.

As part of the Neurosciences Department of the Lerner Research Institute, Lamb was elected as an AAAS Fellow for exemplary contributions to the field of Alzheimer's disease, including development of novel animal models and for advocacy for the disease and research funding.

As part of the Immunology Department of the Lerner Research Institute, Li was elected as an AAAS Fellow for distinguished contributions to the field of molecular immunology, especially for elucidating novel signaling pathways critical in inflammation and autoimmune diseases.
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AAAS is the world's largest general scientific society, and publisher of the journal, Science. AAAS was founded in 1848, and includes 262 affiliated societies and academies of science, serving 10 million individuals.

About Cleveland Clinic

Celebrating its 90th anniversary, Cleveland Clinic is a nonprofit multispecialty academic medical center that integrates clinical and hospital care with research and education. It was founded in 1921 by four renowned physicians with a vision of providing outstanding patient care based upon the principles of cooperation, compassion and innovation. Cleveland Clinic has pioneered many medical breakthroughs, including coronary artery bypass surgery and the first face transplant in the United States. U.S.News & World Report consistently names Cleveland Clinic as one of the nation's best hospitals in its annual "America's Best Hospitals" survey. About 2,800 full-time salaried physicians and researchers and 11,000 nurses represent 120 medical specialties and subspecialties. Cleveland Clinic Health System includes a main campus near downtown Cleveland, eight community hospitals and 16 Family Health Centers in Northeast Ohio, Cleveland Clinic Florida, the Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health in Las Vegas, Cleveland Clinic Canada, and opening in 2013, Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi. In 2010, there were 4 million visits throughout the Cleveland Clinic health system and 155,000 hospital admissions. Patients came for treatment from every state and from more than 100 countries. Visit us at http://www.clevelandclinic.org/. Follow us at www.twitter.com/ClevelandClinic.

Cleveland Clinic

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