Coral Centre awarded 7 years of funding

December 23, 2013

The ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies has been awarded $A28m by the Australian Research Council for 2014 to 2020. The Centre will be reorganised into three new research programs - People and Ecosystems, Ecosystem Dynamics: Past, Present and Future and Responding to a Changing World.

Centre Director, Professor Terry Hughes said that "the vision of the Centre is to provide understanding of coral reefs and their interaction with people, in order to foster their sustainable use, secure the benefits they provide to tropical societies and economies, and enhance the effectiveness of coral reef management world-wide".

Early in 2014 the Centre will be recruiting approximately 12-15 postdoctoral Research Fellows (including new Professorial Fellows) in the social and biological sciences. The Centre will also be providing new scholarships for postgraduate students in all three of the new research programs. Please watch this website for updates

The new Centre will be headquartered at James Cook University with nodes at the Australian National University, the University of Queensland and the University of Western Australia. The Centre is also pleased to have the Australian Institute of Marine Science, the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (France), the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (USA), Stanford University (USA) and the WorldFish Center (Malaysia) as partner organisations.
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ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

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