Neglected tropical diseases burden those overseas, but travelers also at risk

December 25, 2007

Though little known to most Americans, lymphatic filariasis, trachoma, leishmaniasis, onchocerciasis, schistosomiasis and other so-called neglected tropical diseases are responsible for severe health burdens, especially among the world's poorest people. Together, it is estimated that these illnesses, most of which are caused by worms or other parasites, rank sixth among all conditions worldwide in robbing people of quality of life and life itself through disability or premature death, respectively. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, has a long-standing, robust program of research and clinical trials devoted to better understanding and combating neglected tropical diseases, most notably those caused by parasites. In 2006, NIAID devoted $117 million to these projects, which are carried out both in the United States and in countries where the diseases are endemic.

While most sufferers of neglected tropical diseases reside permanently in tropical regions, Americans and other travelers to such areas may also be exposed to these disease-causing organisms. To better gauge illnesses following travel to the tropics and subtropics, the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network, a network of travel/tropical medicine clinics on six continents, was established in 1995. A new paper by NIAID scientist Thomas Nutman, M.D., and colleagues reviews network data collected between 1997 and 2004 to determine demographic and travel characteristics of travelers diagnosed with parasitic worm (filarial) infections. The researchers found that filarial infections responsible for such diseases as onchocerciasis (river blindness), lymphatic filariasis (elephantiasis) and loiasis (African eyeworm illness) made up 271 (0.62 percent) of the 43,722 medical conditions reported to the network during that time period. Additionally, the data showed that immigrants from filarial-endemic regions were most likely to come to the travel/tropical diseases clinics, and that long-term travel of more than one month was more likely to be associated with filarial infection than were shorter trips. The most commonly acquired filarial infection (37 percent) was Onchocerca volvulus, the worm that causes river blindness.

While clinical presentation of filarial disease is known to differ between visitors to and natives of endemic regions, this new analysis provides a quantitative assessment of the characteristics of those who acquire filarial infections following travel. Furthermore, the information collected by the GeoSentinel network can be used to assess not only acute but also chronic infections. Ultimately, the authors write, these data will provide a comprehensive backdrop to pre-travel advice and post-travel treatment for those at risk of acquiring a filarial infection.
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The new paper is but one example of a number of NIAID-supported projects involving tropical diseases caused by parasitic worms. For more than 30 years, for example, NIAID has supported the Schistosome Resource Center and the Filaria Resource Center, where investigators worldwide can obtain schistosome or filarial samples for research or teaching purposes.

ARTICLE:
EM Lipner et al.
Filariasis in travelers presenting to the GeoSentinel surveillance network.
PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0000088 (2007).

NOTE: Media only may access the paper at this link prior to 8 p.m. Eastern Time Dec. 25, 2007: http://www.plos.org/press/pntd-01-03-nutman.pdf

SPOKESPERSONS:
Thomas Nutman, M.D., Deputy Chief, Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, NIAID, can comment on the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network and research on filarial infections.
Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., Director, NIAID, can comment on NIAID's overall research programs in the area of neglected tropical diseases.

CONTACT: To schedule interviews, contact Anne A. Oplinger in the News and Public Information Branch at 301-402-1663 or niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov.

NIAID is a component of the National Institutes of Health. NIAID supports basic and applied research to prevent, diagnose and treat infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections, influenza, tuberculosis, malaria and illness from potential agents of bioterrorism. NIAID also supports research on basic immunology, transplantation and immune-related disorders, including autoimmune diseases, asthma and allergies.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH)--The Nation's Medical Research Agency--includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit http://www.nih.gov.

News releases, fact sheets and other NIAID-related materials are available on the NIAID Web site at http://www.niaid.nih.gov.

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

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