World's largest scientific society announces subjects, dates for 2003 ACS ProSpectives Conferences

December 26, 2002

The 2003 ACS ProSpectives Conference series, sponsored by the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society, will concentrate on six areas of rapidly changing interdisciplinary research. The sessions will cover process chemistry in the pharmaceutical industry, polymorphism in crystals, catalysis in modern organic synthesis, ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity) in the 21st Century, combinatorial chemistry, and integrating proteomics into system biology.

ACS ProSpectives is a series of small conferences for senior-level industry scientists. Each conference examines a field's important topics through presentations by its foremost researchers. Attendance at the conferences is limited to 200 or fewer to facilitate easy interaction among the speakers and those attending. From 15-20 leading experts in each field participate in a given conference.

"ACS ProSpectives conferences are unique in that they are designed in format and content solely to meet the needs of scientists employed in industry," according to John Katz, ACS ProSpectives program director.

The conferences are in addition to the Society's two national meetings and its eight to ten regional meetings held every year. Following are the topics, conference chairs, dates and locations for the six confirmed 2003 ACS ProSpectives Conferences.

Process Chemistry in the Pharmaceutical Industry -- The program will focus on the art of building organic molecules while operating within regulatory constraints.
Kumar Gadamasetti, X-Mine, Inc; Mike Martinelli, Eli Lilly
Condado Plaza Hotel
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Feb. 2-5, 2003

Polymorphism in Crystals: Fundamentals, Prediction, and Industrial Practice -- The state-of-the-art in the often-misunderstood field of crystalline polymorphism will be presented by leading experts in polymorph characterization and prediction, with an emphasis on industrial applications and practice.
Robin Rogers, The University of Alabama; Allan Myerson, Illinois Institute of Technology; Susan Reutzel-Edens. Eli Lilly; Roger J. Davey, UMIST (United Kingdom)
Saddle Brook Resort
Tampa, Fla.
Feb. 23-36, 2003

Catalysis in Modern Organic Synthesis -- Catalytic methodologies for organic synthesis, with a special emphasis on technologies with applications in pharmaceutical science.
Stephen Buchwald, MIT; Gregory Fu, MIT; Eric Jacobsen, Harvard University
Cambridge Marriott
Cambridge, Mass.
March 2-5, 2003

ADMET in the 21st Century: A Comprehensive Review of Technology and Strategic Applications
Rod Cole, Millennium Pharmaceuticals; Tim Olah, Bristol Myers Squibb
Tampa, Fla.
May 4-7, 2003

Combinatorial Chemistry
Chairs to be determined
Lansdowne Conference Center
Leesburg, Va.
Sept. 21-24, 2003

Integrating Proteomics into System Biology
Ruth Van Bogelen, Pfizer; Eric Neumann, Beyond Genomics
Lansdowne Conference Center
Leesburg, Va.
Nov. 9-12, 2003

Further details about the conferences, including instructions on how to register and arrange lodging, are available on www.acsprospectives.org. This site will be updated regularly with the latest information about upcoming ACS ProSpectives conferences.

(EDITOR's NOTE -- News media wishing to attend the conferences should contact Michael Bernstein at 202-872-6042 or at m_bernstein@acs.org).
-end-


American Chemical Society

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