UH Cancer Center researcher looks to ocean to treat sepsis

December 26, 2014

It's likely that you wouldn't have to ask too many of your acquaintances to learn that some they loved died of sepsis. Sepsis, a complication of infection, is one of the leading causes of death in the world. Of the more than one million people diagnosed with sepsis each year in the United States, between 28 percent and 50 percent of them die. It is the tenth leading cause of death among elderly people, and it kills 30% of cancer patients.

Sepsis shock can deprive the organs of blood, triggering widespread organ failure and death. There is little medical personnel can do to help these patients. Currently the only treatment for sepsis is merely supportive in nature, including giving fluids and antibiotics.

Dr. Felix Ikuomola, a PhD candidate in Clinical Research at the John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) and a Graduate Research Assistant at the University of Hawai`i Cancer Center, has received a $104,477 grant from the National Institutes of Health to fund research he hopes will put natural products from Hawai'i's oceans to work blocking sepsis. He is working in the lab of his mentor, UH Cancer Center Assistant Professor Michelle Matter who has an NIH R01 (considered the "gold standard" of research grants) funding. Ikuomola's diversity grant is a supplement to Dr. Matter's research.

"My work in Dr. Matter's lab involves screening small molecules, Fungi and Hawaiian marine natural products for potential inhibitory function in endothelial cell permeability," he explains.

An endothelial cell is a thin layer of structural and functional cells that cover the innermost part of blood and lymphatic vessels. Endothelial cells are responsible for many tissue responses including selective permeability of liquids & small chemicals, host-defense reactions to bacteria, repairs to injured cells, signaling between cells, cell proliferation, vascular smooth muscle tone, and cell migration to injured areas. Injury or damage to endothelial cells result in breakdown in barrier function, causing widened pores in the vascular lining that allow cancer to spread, as well as sepsis, edema, and other vascular life-threatening conditions.

Motivated by deaths close to him


Dr. Ikuomola, a U.S. citizen originally from Nigeria, is inspired to save lives because he has seen so many people lose their own struggle with disease, including members of his family.

"While in Africa, I felt frustrated to see my patients-especially the surgical patients with sepsis- without any treatment options. If there had been a pro-endothelial cell barrier enhancing therapeutics, my patient's lives could have been prolonged," said Dr. Ikuomola.

Dr. Ikuomola points out that the same molecular endothelial permeability mechanism also has been implicated in Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension, the two major leading causes of disease and death in Africans, African-Americans, and Afro-Caribbeans.

"For me, to be involved in vascular biology research is very personal, because when I was seven years old, I lost my beloved father to Hypertension-induced hemorrhagic stroke and cousins to diabetic coma. My patients and family have been the driving force for me to be involved in sepsis research," said Ikuomola.

Why natural marine products?


His special interest is to understand, at the molecular level, how endothelial cells activate endothelial cell permeability to promote leakiness, and how these cells can also activate different pathways to promote endothelial cell barrier integrity and block leakiness. His work in Matter's lab involves screening small molecules, Fungi and Hawaiian marine natural products to potentially inhibit function in endothelial cell permeability.

The complex structure and diversity of natural products plays major role in target-binding selectivity, protein interactions, specificity, and other bio-molecular activities. "We are very hopeful that these Hawaiian marine natural products will work in sepsis because the marine natural products are able to survive the harsh and salty conditions of the ocean and able to control and regulate their internal conditions," said Ikuomola. These marine natural products regulate their cells in such a way that they do not suffer from a hyper-permeability condition which could have led to the uncontrollable influx of ocean water or efflux of cellular contents. "So, this property that maintains the cell integrity of the natural products is encouraging."
-end-
More about Dr. Ikuomola

Dr. Ikuomola is quick to thank those who have inspired and supported his work, and helped him receive the new grant. "I am very grateful to God; my wife Wendy; my mother; Dr. Rosanne Harrigan (JABSOM Director of Faculty Development); Dr. Michelle Matter; Dr. Joe Ramos; my colleagues at the UH Cancer Center Matter Lab; and The National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Science for this diversity supplement grant," he said.

University of Hawaii Cancer Center

Related Cancer Articles from Brightsurf:

New blood cancer treatment works by selectively interfering with cancer cell signalling
University of Alberta scientists have identified the mechanism of action behind a new type of precision cancer drug for blood cancers that is set for human trials, according to research published in Nature Communications.

UCI researchers uncover cancer cell vulnerabilities; may lead to better cancer therapies
A new University of California, Irvine-led study reveals a protein responsible for genetic changes resulting in a variety of cancers, may also be the key to more effective, targeted cancer therapy.

Breast cancer treatment costs highest among young women with metastic cancer
In a fight for their lives, young women, age 18-44, spend double the amount of older women to survive metastatic breast cancer, according to a large statewide study by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Cancer mortality continues steady decline, driven by progress against lung cancer
The cancer death rate declined by 29% from 1991 to 2017, including a 2.2% drop from 2016 to 2017, the largest single-year drop in cancer mortality ever reported.

Stress in cervical cancer patients associated with higher risk of cancer-specific mortality
Psychological stress was associated with a higher risk of cancer-specific mortality in women diagnosed with cervical cancer.

Cancer-sniffing dogs 97% accurate in identifying lung cancer, according to study in JAOA
The next step will be to further fractionate the samples based on chemical and physical properties, presenting them back to the dogs until the specific biomarkers for each cancer are identified.

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers identify one way T cell function may fail in cancer
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have discovered a mechanism by which one type of immune cell, CD8+ T cells, can become dysfunctional, impeding its ability to seek and kill cancer cells.

More cancer survivors, fewer cancer specialists point to challenge in meeting care needs
An aging population, a growing number of cancer survivors, and a projected shortage of cancer care providers will result in a challenge in delivering the care for cancer survivors in the United States if systemic changes are not made.

New cancer vaccine platform a potential tool for efficacious targeted cancer therapy
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have discovered a solution in the form of a cancer vaccine platform for improving the efficacy of oncolytic viruses used in cancer treatment.

American Cancer Society outlines blueprint for cancer control in the 21st century
The American Cancer Society is outlining its vision for cancer control in the decades ahead in a series of articles that forms the basis of a national cancer control plan.

Read More: Cancer News and Cancer Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.