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This is your brain on alcohol (video)

December 27, 2016

WASHINGTON, Dec. 27, 2016 -- It's almost time to ring in 2017. And since most New Year's celebrations include alcohol, Reactions' latest episode explains the chemistry behind its effects - drunkenness, frequent bathroom breaks and occasionally poor decision-making. Find out how it all comes down to ethanol (which, like all things, should be enjoyed in moderation) here: https://youtu.be/1xVqwYxe4Gw.

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