Nav: Home

Coenzyme Q10 supplementation on metabolic profiles of patients with chronic kidney disease

December 27, 2018

Chronic Kidney disease (CKD) is highly associated with all-cause mortality, Diabetic Nephropathy (DN), cardiovascular events and hospitalization whether the patient has an existing risk or current cardiovascular disease or not. CKD can increase the chances of cardiovascular disease by two to fifty times and 50% mortality of patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) on dialysis attributed to CVD and its complications. In this review, Co-enzyme Q10 (CoQ10) was tested as a potential treatment for CKD. The systemic review and meta-analysis of randomized control trials (RCTs) was conducted to evaluate the effects of CoQ10 supplementation on metabolic profiles of patients diagnosed with CKD.

CoQ10 is a potent lipophilic antioxidant that couple's electron transport to oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. It is generally used as an alternative and complementary therapy for diseases with metabolic disorders. The supplementary protein has shown beneficial effects during the treatment of heart failure. It was found that the circulating concentration in patients with CKD had been decreased. This suggested that the CoQ10 antioxidant treatment would be an ideal solution for the disease. The results accumulated during meta-analysis proved that the CoQ10 supplementation significantly reduced total-cholesterol, malondialdehyde, and creatinine levels in patients diagnosed with CKD. It did not affect Triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, fasting glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations.

The current meta-analysis demonstrated that CoQ10 supplementation significantly improved metabolic profile in patients with CKD by reducing total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, MDA and creatinine levels, yet it did not affect fasting glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, and CRP concentrations.
-end-
The article is Open Access till 31st December, 2018. To obtain the article, please visit: http://www.eurekaselect.com/167243

Bentham Science Publishers

Related Cardiovascular Disease Articles:

Is educational attainment associated with lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease?
Men and women with the lowest education level had higher lifetime risks of cardiovascular disease than those with the highest education level, according to a new study published by JAMA Internal Medicine.
Food policies could lower US cardiovascular disease rates
New research conducted by the University of Liverpool and partners shows that food policies, such as fruit and vegetable subsidies, taxes on sugar sweetened drinks, and mass media campaigns to change dietary habits, could avert hundreds of thousands of deaths from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the United States.
Cardiovascular disease causes one-third of deaths worldwide
Cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including heart diseases and stroke, account for one-third of deaths throughout the world, according to a new scientific study that examined every country over the past 25 years.
Kidney disease is a major cause of cardiovascular deaths
In 2013, reduced kidney function was associated with 4 percent of deaths worldwide, or 2.2 million deaths.
Cardiovascular disease costs will exceed $1 trillion by 2035
A new study projects that by 2035, cardiovascular disease, the most costly and prevalent killer, if left unchecked, will place a crushing economic and health burden on the nation's financial and health care systems.
Prescribing drugs for cardiovascular disease prevention in the UK
Drugs such as statins that have the potential to prevent strokes and other types of cardiovascular disease have not been prescribed to a large proportion of people at risk in the UK, according to a research article by Grace Turner of the University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK and colleagues published in PLOS Medicine.
Fatty liver disease contributes to cardiovascular disease and vice versa
For the first time, researchers have shown that a bi-directional relationship exists between fatty liver disease and cardiovascular disease.
More dietary calcium may lower risk of cardiovascular disease
In older people, higher dietary calcium intake may lower the risk of cardiovascular disease, but not of stroke and fracture, new research from South Korea suggests.
Renal hemodynamics and cardiovascular function in health and disease
The SRC will focus on unpublished work that is state-of-the-art in study of cardiovascular and renal disease and hypertension.
Cardiovascular disease in adult survivors of childhood cancer
For adult survivors of childhood cancer, cardiovascular disease presents at an earlier age, is associated with substantial morbidity, and is often asymptomatic.

Related Cardiovascular Disease Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Changing The World
What does it take to change the world for the better? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on activism—what motivates it, why it matters, and how each of us can make a difference. Guests include civil rights activist Ruby Sales, labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta, author Jeremy Heimans, "craftivist" Sarah Corbett, and designer and futurist Angela Oguntala.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#521 The Curious Life of Krill
Krill may be one of the most abundant forms of life on our planet... but it turns out we don't know that much about them. For a create that underpins a massive ocean ecosystem and lives in our oceans in massive numbers, they're surprisingly difficult to study. We sit down and shine some light on these underappreciated crustaceans with Stephen Nicol, Adjunct Professor at the University of Tasmania, Scientific Advisor to the Association of Responsible Krill Harvesting Companies, and author of the book "The Curious Life of Krill: A Conservation Story from the Bottom of the World".