New ingredients in drug-like anti-aging products improve skin

December 28, 2007

Winston-Salem, N.C. - December 28, 2007 - Cosmecueticals, beauty aids that reportedly work like prescription drugs, are providing new ways to treat aging skin. A study recently published in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology explores a variety of new ingredients in cosmeceuticals that provide a visibly noticeable improvement in maturing skin.

The most dramatic and apparent signs of aging include the lack of skin surface regularity, formation of wrinkles, and increased presence of abnormal pigmentation. Zoe Diana Draelos, MD, of Dermatology Consulting Services, High Point, North Carolina, assessed the ingredient efficacy in a variety of cosmeceuticals on each of these areas of aging skin.

Draelos found that skin surface irregularity can be improved through the topical application of niacin, while the appearance of fine lines can be diminished through the application of moisturizers containing engineered peptides and over-the-counter retinoids. Skin pigmentation can become more regular with the use of photoprotective ingredients. Furthermore, combining cosmeceutical ingredients in a moisturizing agent can magnify benefits and improve skin appearance.

"Evidence-based cosmeceutical ingredients can provide anti-aging benefits," Draelos concludes. "This new generation of cosmeceuticals can provide valuable skin benefits."
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This study is published in the December 2007 issue of the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact medicalnews@bos.blackwellpublishing.net.

Zoe Diana Draelos, MD, is affiliated with Dermatology Consulting Services in High Point, NC, and can be reached for questions at zdraelos@northstate.net.

Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology is the official journal of the European Society for Cosmetic and Aesthetic Dermatology (ESCAD). Both the Journal and ESCAD wish to foster the highest standards of patient care in cosmetic dermatology. Each aims to facilitate continuing professional development and provide a forum for the exchange of scientific research and innovative techniques.

Wiley-Blackwell was formed in February 2007 as a result of the acquisition of Blackwell Publishing Ltd. by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., and its merger with Wiley's Scientific, Technical, and Medical business. Together, the companies have created a global publishing business with deep strength in every major academic and professional field. Wiley-Blackwell publishes approximately 1,400 scholarly peer-reviewed journals and an extensive collection of books with global appeal. For more information on Wiley-Blackwell, please visit www.blackwellpublishing.com or http://interscience.wiley.com .


Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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