There may be a 'party' in your genes

December 28, 2009

Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore and Washington DC (Dec 28, 2010) Genetics play a pivotal role in shaping how individual's identify with political parties , according to an article in a recent issue of Political Research Quarterly, the official journal of the Western Political Science Association (published by SAGE).

Political party identification (PID) is among the most studied concepts in modern political science. Scholars have long held that PID was the result of socialization factors, including parental socialization. The possibility that partisan identification could be transmitted genetically rather than socially was not considered and largely left untested.

Using quantitative genetic models, the authors of the article "Is There a 'Party' in Your Genes?' (Peter K. Hatemi, John R. Alford, John R. Hibbing, Nicholas G. Martin, and Lindon J. Eaves) examine the sources of party identification and the intensity of that identification. Together with recent examinations of political attitudes and vote choice, their findings begin to provide a more complete picture of the source of partisanship and the complex nature of the political phenotype.

This article is part of a mini-symposium entitled "The Scientific Analysis of Politics." Top scholars, using evolutionary psychological and biological frameworks, provide fresh approaches to the study of politics and political behavior. .

"What are the best approaches and methodologies toward a scientific study of politics?" write guest editors Rose McDermott and Kristen Renwick Monroe. "We do not mean to reactivate a no longer productive debate about nature versus nurture, since it now seems clear that both forces operate in tandem. Rather by encompassing both facets--nature and nurture--into an integrated perspective, we believe it is possible to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of human political behavior."
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The five Mini Symposium articles "The Scientific Analysis of Politics" in PRQ are available free for a limited time at http://prq.sagepub.com/content/vol62/issue3/#MINISYMPOSIUM.

Political Research Quarterly (PRQ), the official journal of the Western Political Science Association (WPSA), publishes scholarly political science research. Focusing on local, national and global levels, the journal promotes the study and teaching of government and politics, to foster additional research and to facilitate the discussion of public affairs. http://prq.sagepub.com/

SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets. Since 1965, SAGE has helped inform and educate a global community of scholars, practitioners, researchers, and students spanning a wide range of subject areas including business, humanities, social sciences, and science, technology, and medicine. An independent company, SAGE has principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore and Washington DC. www.sagepublications.com

SAGE

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