Myopia-related differences in eye structure may help in developing 'customized' intraocular lenses

December 28, 2015

December 28, 2015 - The presence of myopia, or nearsightedness, significantly affects the muscles used in focusing the lens of the eye--a finding with important implications for the development of "accommodating" implanted intraocular lenses (IOLs) that can adjust to different visual distances, reports a study in the January issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

Differences in the diameter of the ciliary muscles used to focus at different distances may have important implications for providing patients with a "customized" IOL fit. That may improve the ability to use accommodating IOLs as a surgical approach to correcting age-related declines in near vision, or presbyopia, suggests the new research by Kathryn Richdale, OD, PhD, of State University of New York College of Optometry and colleagues.

Eye Measures Vary with Vision Prescription and Age

Using eight different high-tech instruments and results of other imaging studies, the researchers made high-resolution measurements of the eye structures in 91 adults, aged 30 to 50 years. The participants--all free of cataracts or other eye diseases--had vision prescriptions ranging from nearsightedness (myopia) to farsightedness (hyperopia).

The various measures of eye structure were analyzed for association with age, refraction (vision prescription), and accommodation (the ability to focus on distant or near objects by changing the shape of the lens of the eye). As we age, loss of lens accommodation causes presbyopia--decreased ability to focus on close-up objects.

Consistent with previous studies, the results showed that the lens becomes thicker, less flexible, and more sharply curved with age. After adjustment for other factors, age was also related to a decrease in the diameter of the ring of ciliary muscles that change the shape of the lens in the process of accommodation. This tightening of the ciliary ring may also contribute to the development of presbyopia in older eyes.

The study also found noticeable differences related to refractive error: eyes with myopia were significantly larger, especially front to back (axial elongation). As reported in previous studies, myopia was also associated with increased curvature of the lens.

But the results also led to a new discovery: eyes with myopia had a larger ciliary muscle ring diameter. Importantly, the effect was much greater than the effect of age--the ciliary muscle ring for a 40-year-old person with myopia would be substantially larger than for a 60-year-old person with hyperopia.

That has important implications for the use of accommodating or "focusing" IOLs as a surgical approach to correcting presbyopia. Placed after removal of the inflexible and less-transparent lens in patients with cataracts, accommodating IOLs can change focus--much as the natural lens does in younger people. However, these lens implants have yet to be widely accepted, reflecting mixed data on their ability to produce usable and sufficient changes in focus.

The new study helps explain why the focusing power of accommodating IOLs differs between individuals, depending on their age and prescription type. "The results provide the first evidence for why accommodating IOLs may not have the same effect in nearsighted people as they do in farsighted people," comments Anthony Adams, OD, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of Optometry and Vision Science.

"The results of this study suggest that accommodating IOLs may need to be available in more than one diameter to allow for maximum benefit," Dr. Richdale and coauthors write. In the future, developing new techniques of measuring ciliary muscle ring diameter might help in providing a "customized" IOL fit for treatment to correct presbyopia.
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Click here to read "The Effect of Age, Accommodation, and Refractive Error on the Adult Human Eye."

Article: "The Effect of Age, Accommodation, and Refractive Error on the Adult Human Eye" (doi: 10.1097/OPX.0000000000000757)

About Optometry and Vision Science

Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry, is the most authoritative source for current developments in optometry, physiological optics, and vision science. This frequently cited monthly scientific journal has served primary eye care practitioners for more than 75 years, promoting vital interdisciplinary exchange among optometrists and vision scientists worldwide.

About the American Academy of Optometry

Founded in 1922, the American Academy of Optometry is committed to promoting the art and science of vision care through lifelong learning. All members of the Academy are dedicated to the highest standards of optometric practice through clinical care, education or research.

About Wolters Kluwer

Wolters Kluwer is a global leader in professional information services. Professionals in the areas of legal, business, tax, accounting, finance, audit, risk, compliance and healthcare rely on Wolters Kluwer's market leading information-enabled tools and software solutions to manage their business efficiently, deliver results to their clients, and succeed in an ever more dynamic world.

Wolters Kluwer reported 2014 annual revenues of €3.7 billion. The group serves customers in over 170 countries, and employs over 19,000 people worldwide. The company is headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands. Wolters Kluwer shares are listed on NYSE Euronext Amsterdam (WKL) and are included in the AEX and Euronext 100 indices. Wolters Kluwer has a sponsored Level 1 American Depositary Receipt program. The ADRs are traded on the over-the-counter market in the U.S. (WTKWY).

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