Popping the cork on champagne science facts (video)

December 29, 2014

WASHINGTON, Dec. 29, 2014 -- When the clock strikes midnight on New Year's Eve, champagne bottles get popped all around the world. So what is it exactly that sends that cork flying? And what's the best way to pour your bubbly? This week, Reactions gives you plenty of champagne facts and tips to impress your fellow partygoers as you ring in the New Year. Check out the video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rrVgGjuFDus.

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