Surgical treatment of migraines reduces sick days and increases employee productivity ASPS study

December 30, 2004

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill. - With more than 28 million Americans suffering from debilitating migraine headaches each year, employers also suffer through missed days from work and reduced productivity. However, Migraine sufferers who had surgical treatment reduced the amount of time missed from work by 73 percent, according to a study published in the January issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery® (PRS), the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). Additionally, surgical treatment substantially lowered the annual cost of migraine care for patients, the study found.

"The economic impact of migraine headaches on American businesses is staggering due to the loss of employee time and productivity each year," said ASPS member and study author Bahman Guyuron, MD, clinical professor of plastic surgery, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland. "By identifying the trigger areas for migraines and performing targeted surgical procedures, we significantly reduced or eliminated their migraines and the amount of time missed from work."

Patients in the study were injected with Botox® to help determine which muscles in the forehead, or back of the head, triggered their migraines. Once identified, these muscles were then surgically removed.

Prior to surgery, migraine sufferers missed 4.4 days of work per month, according to the study. After surgery, patients only missed 1.2 days per month and the employee out of pocket expense for annual treatment was reduced from approximately $7,612 to $925.

Plastic surgeons successfully reduced the frequency, intensity or duration of migraines for 92 percent of the patients studied. In fact, the surgical treatment eliminated migraine headaches for 35 percent of the patients studied.

"Before surgery, my patients expressed extreme frustration by not being able to gain control of their lives," said Dr. Guyuron. "They wanted to work or spend time with their family. Through our new surgical discoveries, we are able to help the appropriate patients escape the awful effects of migraines and start living their lives again."

Businesses lose approximately $13 billion per year due to migraines, according to a study published in the April 1999 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine. In addition, the National Headache Foundation estimates 157 million workdays are lost annually because of the pain and associated symptoms of migraines.
-end-
For referrals to plastic surgeons certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery and to learn more about cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery, call the ASPS at 888-4-PLASTIC (888-475-2784) or visit www.plasticsurgery.org.

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons is the largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons in the world. With nearly 5,000 members, the society is recognized as a leading authority and information source on cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery. ASPS comprises 94 percent of all board-certified plastic surgeons in the United States. Founded in 1931, the society represents physicians certified by The American Board of Plastic Surgery or The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

American Society of Plastic Surgeons

Related Migraines Articles from Brightsurf:

TMS shows promise in treating stroke, dementia and migraines
TMS shows promise in treating a broad range of neurological disorders, including stroke, dementia and migraines.

Nightly sleep disturbance linked to daily risk of migraines
The team's findings generally support patients' reports of sleep disturbance as a trigger for migraines.

A new link between migraines, opioid overuse may be key to treating pain
Researchers have discovered that a peptide links together migraine pain and pain induced by opioid overuse.

Migraines linked to higher risk of dementia
Dementia is the most common neurological disease in older adults, whereas headaches, including migraines, are the most common neurological disorder across all ages.

1-2 caffeinated drinks not linked with higher risk of migraines; 3+ may trigger them
In a study published in the American Journal of Medicine, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Harvard T.H.

New antibody treatment provides little relief for high-frequency migraine patients
An early assessment reveals that the newly approved antibody treatment Erenumbab does not seem effective among patients who suffer from high-frequency migraines.

Migraine increases the risk of complications during pregnancy and childbirth
Pregnant women with migraine have an increased risk of miscarriage, caesarean sections and giving birth to a child with low birth weight.

Migraines may increase risk of pregnancy complications
In a study of women in Denmark with and without migraines who became pregnant, migraines were associated with an increased risk of pregnancy-associated hypertension disorders in the mother.

One in every 12 Canadian with migraines has attempted suicide
A new study by the University of Toronto, published online this week in the journal Archives of Suicide Research, found that adults with migraine who had been sexually abused during childhood were three times more likely to have attempted suicide.

Discovery of novel mechanisms that cause migraines
Researchers at CNRS, Université Côte d'Azur and Inserm have demonstrated a new mechanism related to the onset of migraine.

Read More: Migraines News and Migraines Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.