BMC, Boston University School of Medicine cardiologist named 1 of America's Top Doctors

December 30, 2008

(Boston) -Wellesley resident Gary Balady, MD, a cardiologist in the Division of Medicine at Boston Medical Center (BMC) and professor of medicine at the Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) was recently named one of America's Top Doctors by Castle Connolly Medical Ltd.

The America's Top Doctors guide, recognized by consumers seeking high-quality medical care, is a trusted and authoritative resource for identifying top doctors in the United States. The selected top doctors are nominated by hospital presidents; vice presidents of medical affairs; and chiefs of service in anesthesiology, obstetrics and gynecology, medicine, emergency medicine, pediatrics, psychiatry, radiology and surgery; as well as randomly selected board-certified physicians.

Balady is director of BMC's Preventive Cardiology Program, a leading exercise-training and risk-factor modification program for patients who have heart disease. He is also director of the Non-Invasive Cardiovascular Laboratories at BMC.

Balady is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation and the American Heart Association (AHA). He serves the AHA both nationally and locally by leading and/or participating on several key committees involved with exercise, physical activity and preventive cardiology. He is past chairman of the AHA's Council on Clinical Cardiology, and past president of the AHA Greater Boston Division.

Balady has either chaired or been a member of several writing groups of the AHA and ACC, which generates guidelines regarding exercise testing and training, and preventive cardiology. Balady currently serves on the AHA Founders Affiliate's Board of Directors.

Balady, who received his medical degree from the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School of New Brunswick, N. J. performed his cardiology residency and fellowship at Boston Medical Center.

His research interests focus on exercise testing and training of cardiac patients, with a particular emphasis on the physiologic changes that occur in the cardiovascular system with regular exercise, as well as assessment of outcomes after cardiac rehabilitation. He is an associate editor for the journal Circulation, and is past Editor in Chief of the Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation.
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Boston University

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