The Guardian's Science Weekly | Top Science Podcasts 2020

The top science podcasts of 2020 updated daily.

The Guardian's Science Weekly
The award winning Science Weekly is the best place to learn about the big discoveries and debates in biology, chemistry, physics, and sometimes even maths. From the Guardian science desk - Ian Sample, Hannah Devlin & Nicola Davis meet the great thinkers and doers in science and technology.
Deep Blue Notes: episode two
2020-12-01 21:00:19
Wildlife recordist Chris Watson and spatial audio sound artist Prof Tony Myatt continue on their three-part journey to the Sea of Cortez fishing for the song of the blue whale. Chris speaks to blue wales expert Dr Diane Gendron, and artists Diana Schniedermeier and Ina Krüger, who produce ocean sound installations. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sciencepod">theguardian.com/sciencepod</a>

20 minutes, 8 seconds
Deep Blue Notes: episode one
2020-11-30 21:00:16
Wildlife recordist Chris Watson and spatial audio sound artist Prof Tony Myatt begin a three-part journey to the Sea of Cortez hunting for the song of the largest, and possibly loudest, animal that has ever lived - the blue whale. It's also an animal that Chris has never managed to record. Will this trip change that?. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sciencepod">theguardian.com/sciencepod</a>

21 minutes, 13 seconds
Covid-19: how vaccines lead to immunity - podcast
2020-11-25 21:00:48
With a number of Covid-19 vaccines seemingly on the way, Nicola Davis talks to Prof Eleanor Riley about how they might help the body's defence mechanisms fight the virus. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sciencepod">theguardian.com/sciencepod</a>

15 minutes, 33 seconds
A more accurate way of measuring the effect of computer games
2020-11-23 21:00:11
The Guardian's UK technology editor Alex Hern speaks to Prof Andy Przybylski from the Oxford Internet Institute about his new approach of looking at the impact of computer games on mental health. According to Prof Przybylski, this new approach is more objective - but it also depends on gaming companies being more transparent. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sciencepod">theguardian.com/sciencepod</a>

17 minutes, 21 seconds
From the archive: an interview with Nobel laureate Sir Roger Penrose (part 2)
2020-11-18 21:00:03
The second part of Ian Sample's 2016 interview with Prof Sir Roger Penrose, which includes a quantum theory of consciousness and the age-old question of whether mathematics is invented or discovered. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sciencepod">theguardian.com/sciencepod</a>

18 minutes, 4 seconds
From the archive: an interview with Nobel laureate Sir Roger Penrose (part 1)
2020-11-16 21:00:25
In the first part of this episode from 2016, Ian Sample speaks with the acclaimed mathematician and physicist Prof Sir Roger Penrose about his then most recent book, Fashion, Faith, and Fantasy in the New Physics of the Universe. Warning of the potential dangers of dogmatic belief and unheralded faith, the recent Nobel laureate asks whether string theory has become too fashionable and warns of an overreliance on quantum mechanics. Part 2 coming on Thursday. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sciencepod">theguardian.com/sciencepod</a>

19 minutes, 37 seconds
Covid-19: what can we learn from the London blitz?
2020-11-12 02:46:07
Ian Sample speaks to Prof Edgar Jones about the comparative psychological impacts of the blitz bombings of London and the Covid-19 pandemic. Including the role trust in government plays and what we might expect during the second wave of infections. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sciencepod">theguardian.com/sciencepod</a>

16 minutes, 37 seconds
Covid-19: what's up with the coronavirus cough?
2020-11-09 21:00:00
Linda Geddes speaks to Prof Jacky Smith about one of Covid-19's most consistent symptoms: the persistent dry cough. As winter arrives in the northern hemisphere, how do we tell the difference between the possible onset of the virus and the kind of routine coughs normally experienced at this time of year?. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sciencepod">theguardian.com/sciencepod</a>

14 minutes, 46 seconds
Investigating the historic eruption of Mount Vesuvius
2020-11-04 21:00:36
When Mount Vesuvius erupted in AD79, the damage wreaked was catastrophic. Ash and pumice darkened the skies, and hot gas flowed from the volcano. Uncovering the victims, fated to lie frozen in time for 2,000 years, has shown they died in a range of gruesome ways. Nicola Davis speaks to Pier Paolo Patrone about his work analysing ancient inhabitants of Pompeii and nearby towns, and what it tells us about the risk people face today. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sciencepod">theguardian.com/sciencepod</a>

16 minutes, 37 seconds
Covid-19: How do you make a vaccine?
2020-11-02 21:00:46
With any future Covid-19 vaccine requiring its manufacturing process to be signed off as part of its regulatory approval for use on the general population, Madeleine Finlay talks to Dr Stephen Morris from the Future Vaccine Manufacturing Research Hub about how vaccines are made at the volume and speed required for a mass vaccination programme. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sciencepod">theguardian.com/sciencepod</a>

16 minutes, 16 seconds
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