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Statistical vigilantes: the war on scientific fraud

From The Guardian's Science Weekly - Hannah Devlin delves into the case of a shamed Japanese scientist to explore how statistical malpractice is damaging science - whether employed knowingly or not


The Guardian's Science Weekly
The award winning Science Weekly is the best place to learn about the big discoveries and debates in biology, chemistry, physics, and sometimes even maths. From the Guardian science desk - Ian Sample, Hannah Devlin & Nicola Davis meet the great thinkers and doers in science and technology.

Statistical vigilantes: the war on scientific fraud
2017-09-14 02:53:55
Hannah Devlin delves into the case of a shamed Japanese scientist to explore how statistical malpractice is damaging science - whether employed knowingly or not
27 minutes, 48 seconds


Soundscape ecology with Bernie Krause
2018-06-14 22:00:08
Do you know what noise a hungry sea anemone makes? Soundscape ecologist Bernie Krause does. Armed with over 5,000 hours of recordings, he takes Ian Sample on a journey through the natural world and demonstrates why sound is such a powerful tool for conservation


The psychological effects of inequality
2018-06-08 03:10:21
Wealth inequality has skyrocketed in the UK, as has anxiety, stress and mental illness. Could the two be linked? Richard Lea investigates


Finding a voice: why we sound unique
2018-05-31 22:00:42
Each and everyone of us has a voice that is unique. As a result, we make a lot of assumptions about someone from just the way they speak. But are these judgements fair? And what if they're wrong? Nicola Davis explores


Radiophobia: why do we fear nuclear power?
2018-05-24 22:00:39
Nuclear energy is back on the UK government's agenda. However, concerns about safety have plagued this technology for decades. Given it kills less people than wind, coal or gas, why are we so radiophobic? Ian Sample investigates.


Why is asbestos still killing people?
2018-05-17 23:00:51
Every year, more people die from asbestos exposure than road traffic accidents in Great Britain. Many countries still continue to build with this lethal substance - but why? Hannah Devlin investigates


Growing brains in labs
2018-05-10 22:00:35
This week: Hannah Devlin explores how scientists are growing human brains in labs. Why are they so keen to explore the possibilities? What are the ethical concerns being raised by experts?


Cross Section: Carlo Rovelli
2018-05-03 22:00:16
Guest host Richard Lea reimagines time with theoretical physicist Carlo Rovelli. What is time, after all? Should we be thinking about it differently?


The curious case of the dodo
2018-04-27 07:11:58
This week: Nicola Davis investigates the death by fowl play of one of the world's most famous dodo specimens. So what do we know about the dodo as a species? And what questions does this murder case raise?


The science behind why we fight
2018-04-20 09:54:22
This week, Ian Sample asks: why do humans fight? Can science tell us anything about what drives us to violence?


Alternative medicine and its sceptics
2018-04-13 05:01:05
This week, Hannah Devlin asks: what are sceptics of alternative medicine saying about its rise? And what can their thoughts tell us about how the scientific sceptic movement is approaching the conversation?


A Neuroscientist Explains: how we read words - podcast
2018-04-08 22:00:52
For our final episode of this series, Daniel Glaser (with a little misguided help from his producer Max) attempts to unpick what the brain does - and doesn't do - when we read


What our teeth tell us about our evolutionary past
2018-04-06 03:12:08
This week, Nicola Davis asks: what clues do our teeth hold about our species? And what can they tell us about our past?


A Neuroscientist Explains: where perception ends and hallucination begins - podcast
2018-04-02 03:19:37
When it comes to perceiving the world around us, how much of it is due to 'bottom-up' sensory data and how much comes from the 'top-down' predictions we make? Most importantly; how can the delicate dance between the two lead to hallucinations?


The trouble with science
2018-03-30 02:48:06
Scientists are tasked with helping us understand our world. When the science is right, they help move humanity forward. But what about when science is wrong?


Inside the secret life of the teenage brain
2018-03-23 11:54:32
Hannah Devlin speaks to neuroscientist Prof Sarah-Jayne Blakemore about her groundbreaking research into the adolescent brain


A Neuroscientist Explains: how whooping increases your enjoyment - podcast
2018-03-23 11:26:32
Daniel Glaser explores the complex relationship between mind and body when it comes to emotion


A Neuroscientist Explains: psychology's replication crisis - podcast trailer
2018-03-20 08:32:44
In episode three of the second season of A Neuroscientist Explains, Daniel Glaser revisits a weekly column that saw him roped into what is now being called a crisis for psychology and further afield


What do the chemical signatures of deadly nerve agents tell us about their origins?
2018-03-16 09:46:47
Ian Sample talks to two fellow Guardian reporters and a professor of environmental toxicology about the Salisbury spy poisoning


A Neuroscientist Explains: the origins of social behaviour - podcast trailer
2018-03-15 04:46:17
In episode two of the second season of our A Neuroscientist Explains podcast, Daniel Glaser explores the evolutionary origins of social conformity


Is it possible to enhance and rewire the adult brain?
2018-03-09 10:38:30
Nicola Davis asks: can we increase the window of brain plasticity in the later stages of life? And what do we know about the implications of doing so?


A Neuroscientist Explains: is the internet addictive? - podcast
2018-03-04 22:00:08
Dr Daniel Glaser is back. To kick off season two he asks whether there is a connection between reward and addiction. And can we really get addicted to Twitter?


A Neuroscientist Explains: is the internet addictive? - podcast
2018-03-04 22:00:08
Dr Daniel Glaser is back. To kick off season two he asks whether there is a connection between reward and addiction. And can we really get addicted to Twitter?


Cross Section: Steven Pinker
2018-03-02 08:59:23
We ask Prof Steven Pinker whether today's doom and gloom headlines are a sign we're worse off than in centuries gone by, or if human wellbeing is at an all-time high


A Neuroscientist Explains: season two trailer - podcast
2018-02-27 07:15:06
Dr Daniel Glaser and Producer Max are back for a second season of A Neuroscientist Explains - and this time they're going it alone!


What happened to US diplomats in Cuba?
2018-02-23 10:19:40
Ian Sample delves into a preliminary study of US embassy staff said to have been targeted by an energy source in Cuba. With no unifying explanation, what do scientists think happened?


Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
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