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Exploring the far side of the moon

From The Guardian's Science Weekly - Hannah Devlin looks at why there is renewed interest in lunar exploration following the Chinese Chang'e 4 adventure on the far side of the moon


The Guardian's Science Weekly
The award winning Science Weekly is the best place to learn about the big discoveries and debates in biology, chemistry, physics, and sometimes even maths. From the Guardian science desk - Ian Sample, Hannah Devlin & Nicola Davis meet the great thinkers and doers in science and technology.

Exploring the far side of the moon
2019-01-10 22:00:04
Hannah Devlin looks at why there is renewed interest in lunar exploration following the Chinese Chang'e 4 adventure on the far side of the moon
25 minutes, 23 seconds


Cross Section: Matt Parker
2019-03-14 23:00:12
Happy International Pi Day. To celebrate, Hannah Devlin is joined by the mathematician and comedian Matt Parker to discuss maths anxiety, how much today's world relies on number crunching and what happens when we get it wrong. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sciencepod">theguardian.com/sciencepod</a>


Gender data gap and a world built for men | podcast
2019-03-07 22:00:41
Today is International Women's Day, and so Science Weekly teams up with the Guardian's tech podcast, Chips with Everything. Nicola Davis and Jordan Erica Webber look at the repercussions of a male-orientated world - from drugs that don't work for women to VR headsets that give them motion sickness. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sciencepod">theguardian.com/sciencepod</a>


Farewell to Nasa's Mars rover Opportunity
2019-02-28 22:00:10
Nicola Davis bids a fond farewell to the Mars rover Opportunity after Nasa declared the mission finally over, 15 years after the vehicle landed on the red planet.. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sciencepod">theguardian.com/sciencepod</a>


Do we need another massive particle collider? Science Weekly podcast
2019-02-21 22:00:21
With the Large Hadron Collider reaching its upper limits, scientists around the world are drawing up plans for a new generation of super colliders. Ian Sample weighs up whether or not the potential new discoveries a collider may make will justify the cost of building them.. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://gu.com/sciencepod">gu.com/sciencepod</a>


Cross Section: Paul Davies
2019-02-14 22:00:12
Nicola Davis talks to the theoretical physicist Paul Davies, who has been trying to find the solution to one of humankind's trickier questions - what is life?


Where on earth is North?
2019-02-08 00:27:59
Earth's north magnetic pole wandering so quickly in recent decades that this week, scientists decided to update the World Magnetic Model, which underlies navigation for ships and planes today. Ian Sample looks at our relationship with the magnetic north.


Cross Section: Jo Dunkley
2019-01-31 22:00:46
Jo Dunkley is a professor of physics and astrophysical sciences at Princeton University. Hannah Devlin talks to her about what it's like to work on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope in Chile, where they need to bring oxygen tanks for safety.


Toxic legacy: what to do with Britain's nuclear waste
2019-01-24 22:00:29
The UK has a problem and it isn't going to go away anytime soon. But what to do about it? This week Geoff Marsh explores two options, including plans to bury the UK's nuclear waste deep underground


How do we define creativity?
2019-01-17 22:00:11
In our latest collaboration, Ian Sample teams up with Jordan Erica Webber of Chips with Everything to look at why artwork produced using artificial intelligence is forcing us to look at how we define creativity


Exploring the far side of the moon
2019-01-10 22:00:04
Hannah Devlin looks at why there is renewed interest in lunar exploration following the Chinese Chang'e 4 adventure on the far side of the moon


Did a supervolcano cause the dinosaurs' demise?
2019-01-03 22:00:10
Some scientists are beginning to question whether it really was an asteroid impact that led to the dinosaurs' extinction - instead, they think it may have been a supervolcano in India. Graihagh Jackson investigates


Cross Section: Hannah Fry
2018-12-27 22:00:17
Dr Hannah Fry won the Christopher Zeeman medal in August for her contributions to the public understanding of the mathematical sciences. Ian Sample has invited her on the podcast to discuss her love of numbers. Plus, he asks, can we really use this discipline to predict human behaviour?


Cross Section: Dame Jane Francis
2018-12-20 22:00:23
Prof Dame Jane Francis knows Antarctica better than most: she's spent the majority of her career researching this icy landscape. Ian Sample talks to her about what it's like to camp in Antarctica and what her findings can tell us about our future on this planet


Oh my: a psychological approach to awe
2018-12-13 22:00:39
Nicola Davis asks what's behind one of humanity's most powerful and possibly evolutionarily important emotions


Gene-edited babies: why are scientists so appalled?
2018-12-06 22:00:13
Last week Dr He Jiankui announced he had created the world's first gene-edited babies. Hundreds of Chinese scientists have signed a letter condemning the research. Hannah Devlin delves into why He's research has caused such uproar


Cross Section: Tim Peake
2018-11-29 22:00:35
Tim Peake beat 8,172 applicants for a spot on the European Space Agency's astronaut training programme. Ian Sample talks to him about the selection process and the intensive training he went through


Can we trust artificial intelligence lie detectors?
2018-11-22 22:00:08
Liar liar, pants on fire? In this collaboration between the Guardian's Science Weekly and Chips with Everything podcasts, we explore whether it will ever be possible to build intelligent machines to detect porky pies


Can we trust AI lie detectors? Chips with Everything podcast
2018-11-22 22:00:06
In this collaboration between the Guardian's Science Weekly and Chips with Everything podcasts, we explore whether we will ever be able to build an intelligent machine to detect our lies. And if we did, could we trust it?


Treating cancer: what role could our diet play?
2018-11-15 22:01:00
Food is an essential part of everyone's life but how does what we eat affect our health? Could we eat to treat our illnesses? Top oncologists from around the world are beginning to study the role of diet in cancer treatment and early results look promising. Hannah Devlin investigates.


Cross Section: Sir Venki Ramakrishnan
2018-11-08 22:00:09
Nicola Davis sits down with Nobel prize-winning scientist Sir Venki Ramakrishnan to discuss the competition he faced in the race to discover the ribosome - AKA the gene machine. Is competition good for science, or would a collaborative approach be better?


What role should the public play in science?
2018-11-01 23:00:24
How far is too far when it comes to the public directing research? There are concerns than a science journal may revise a paper amid pressure from activists. It raises the issue of what role the public should play and whether science should have boundaries to protect its integrity. Ian Sample presents.


Falling fertility: lessons learned from Botswana
2018-10-25 22:00:07
Fifty years ago, the average woman in Botswana had seven children. Now she will have fewer than three. Enabling women to control their fertility has had huge ramifications for their health, education and employment - could President Trump's ' global gag rule' threaten this? Nicola Davis travels to Botswana to investigate


Falling fertility: lessons learned from Botswana
2018-10-25 22:00:07
Fifty years ago, the average woman in Botswana had seven children. Now she will have fewer than three. Enabling women to control their fertility has had huge ramifications for their health, education and employment - could President Trump's ' global gag rule' threaten this? Nicola Davis travels to Botswana to investigate


Mars is barred: why we shouldn't go to the red planet
2018-10-18 22:00:15
Elon Musk believes we should colonise Mars to ensure the survival of the human race. But is this reasoning compelling enough? Hannah Devlin ponders the case against setting our sites on Mars


A step in the right direction: could implants help people walk again?
2018-10-11 23:00:23
Four people with paraplegia were recently implanted with electrodes in their lower backs. They all regained movement below their injuries, and two walked again. This week Nicola Davis investigates this technique - epidural stimulation - and other approaches for treating spinal cord injuries


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