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Nature Podcast | Top Science Podcasts 2020

The top science podcasts of 2020 updated daily.


Nature Podcast
The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to neuroscience, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.

13 February 2020: The puzzling structures of muddled materials, and paving the way for the quantum internet
2020-02-12 10:01:31
This week, uncovering the structure of materials with useful properties, and quantum entanglement over long distances. In this episode: 00:45 Analysing Prussian blues Analogues of the paint pigment Prussian blue are used in a variety of chemical processes. Now, researchers have uncovered their atomic structure. Research Article: Simonov et al.; News and Views: Ordered absences observed in porous framework materials 08:17 Research Highlights Teenagers' natural sleep cycles impact on academic performance, and an extinct, giant rodent with a surprisingly tiny brain. Research Highlight: A teenager's body clock can ring in school success; Research Highlight: Giant extinct rodent was all brawn and little brain 10:49 Distant entanglement Researchers have demonstrated quantum entanglement between two points separated by 50 km of fibre optic cables. Research Article: Yu et al. 17:17 News Chat The latest on the coronavirus outbreak, and gene editing gets an upgrade. News: Coronavirus: latest news on spreading infection; News: Super-precise CRISPR tool enhanced by enzyme engineering For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
26 minutes, 49 seconds


06 February 2020: Out-of-office emails and work-life-balance, and an update on the novel coronavirus outbreak
2020-02-05 10:01:40
This week, how setting an out-of-office email could help promote a kinder academic culture. In this episode: 00:47 Being truly out of office Last year, a viral tweet about emails sparked a deeper conversation about academics' work-life-balance. Could email etiquette help tip the balance? Careers Article: Out of office replies and what they can say about you 09:35 Research Highlights Finding the 'greenest' oranges, and the benefits of 'baby talk'. Research Article: Bell and Horvath; Research Highlight: Babies benefit when Mum and Dad are fluent in 'baby talk' 12:06 News Chat Updates on the novel coronavirus, assessing Iran's nuclear capabilities, and the potential impacts of Brexit on UK research. News: Coronavirus: latest news on spreading infection; News: How quickly can Iran make a nuclear bomb?; News: Brexit is happening: what does it mean for science? For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
25 minutes, 39 seconds


30 January 2020: Linking Australian bushfires to climate change, and Asimov's robot ethics
2020-01-29 10:01:38
This week, establishing the role of climate change in Australian bushfires, and revisiting Isaac Asimov's ethical rules for robots. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
28 minutes, 22 seconds


23 January: How stress can cause grey hair, and the attitude needed to tackle climate change
2020-01-22 10:01:42
23 January: How stress can cause grey hair, and the attitude needed to tackle climate change For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
26 minutes, 13 seconds


16 January 2020: Strange objects at the centre of the galaxy, and improving measurements of online activity
2020-01-15 10:01:06
Strange objects at the centre of the galaxy, and improving measurements of online activity. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
25 minutes, 32 seconds


09 January 2020: A look ahead at science in 2020
2020-01-08 10:01:44
In this episode of the podcast, Nature reporter Davide Castelvecchi joins us to talk about the big science events to look out for in 2020. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
10 minutes, 33 seconds


01 January 2020: Our reporters' top picks of 2019
2020-01-01 07:00:00
In this special round-up episode of the Nature Podcast, our reporters choose their favourite podcast piece of 2019. In this episode: 00:33 A sole sensation A study of people who do and don't wear shoes looks into whether calluses make feet less sensitive. Nature Podcast: 26 June 2019; Research article: Holowka et al.; News and Views: Your sensitive sole 08:56 The make up of the far side of the Moon Initial observations from the first lander to touch down on the far side of the Moon. Nature Podcast: 15 May 2019; Research article: Li et al. 15:43 Growth Mindset How a one hour course could improve academic achievement. Nature Podcast: 07 August 2019; Research article: Yeager et al. 27:44 'Manferences' Nature investigates the prevalence of conferences where most of the speakers are male. Nature Podcast: 11 September 2019; News Feature: How to banish manels and manferences from scientific meetings 34:02 Q&A with Nobel Prize winner John Goodenough We talk to John Goodenough, who was jointly awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his role in the development of the lithium-ion battery. Podcast Extra: 09 October 2019 For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
38 minutes, 5


Nature PastCast, December 1920: The Quantum Theory
2019-12-27 07:00:00
In this episode, we're heading back to the early twentieth century, when physicists had become deeply entangled in the implications of the quantum theory. Was the world at its smallest scales continuous, or built of discrete units? It all began with Max Planck. His Nobel Prize was the subject of a Nature news article in 1920. In this episode, we're heading back to the early twentieth century, when physicists had become deeply entangled in the implications of the quantum theory. Was the world at its smallest scales continuous, or built of discrete units? It all began with Max Planck. His Nobel Prize was the subject of a Nature news article in 1920. This episode was first broadcast in December 2013. From the archive Nature 16 December 1920 For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
12 minutes, 28 seconds


Podcast Extra: From climate lawyer to climate activist
2019-12-23 07:01:20
In this Podcast Extra, Nature's Chief Opinion Editor Sara Abdulla meets with Farhana Yamin to discuss why she ditched resolutions in favour of activism. This is an extended version of an interview originally broadcast in September. In this Podcast Extra, Nature's Chief Opinion Editor Sara Abdulla meets with Farhana to discuss why she ditched resolutions in favour of activism. This is an extended version of an interview originally broadcast in September. Comment: Why I broke the law for climate change For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
18 minutes, 12 seconds


Podcast Extra: Epigenetics
2019-12-20 07:01:00
As part of Nature's 150th anniversary celebrations, Nick Howe dives into the topic of epigenetics. Since its origin in 1942, the term 'epigenetics' has been repeatedly defined and redefined. There's always been hype around the field, but what actually is epigenetics and how much does it influence our genes? In this Podcast Extra, Nick Howe speaks to Edith Heard, Director General of the EMBL, and Giacomo Cavalli, from the Institute of Human Genetics, to guide us through these questions and find out about the history and future of epigenetics. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
11 minutes, 2 seconds




Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Manoush's Favorites: Moving Forward
We're hard at work on new episodes of the TED Radio Hour, which will start rolling out in March. In the meantime, new host Manoush Zomorodi shares some of her favorite episodes of the show. This episode originally aired on June 21, 2019. When the life you've built slips out of your grasp, you're often told it's best to move on. But is that true? Instead of forgetting the past, TED speakers describe how we can move forward with it. Guests include writers Nora McInerny and Suleika Jaouad, and human rights advocate Lindy Lou Isonhood.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#551 Translating Science, Part 2
This week on Science for the People, we're discussing how Siksika become one of the official translation languages for press releases from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). The area of the world that is now known as Canada has an abundance of distinct languages; according to the 2016 Census, over 70 are still spoken. But the British government, and then the Canadian government, spent generations trying to prevent children from learning these languages. One of the languages spoken in the prairies is Siksika, also called Blackfoot (the English translation). Host Marion Kilgour speaks to Sharon Yellowfly and Corey Gray...
Now Playing: Radiolab

The Other Latif: Episode 3
The Other Latif Radiolab's Latif Nasser always believed his name was unique, singular, completely his own. Until one day when he makes a bizarre and shocking discovery. He shares his name with another man: Abdul Latif Nasser, detainee 244 at Guantanamo Bay. The U.S. government paints a terrifying picture of The Other Latif as Al-Qaeda's top explosives expert, and one of the most important advisors to Osama bin Laden. Nasser's lawyer claims that he was at the wrong place at the wrong time, and that he was never even in Al-Qaeda. This clash leads Radiolab's Latif into a years-long investigation, picking apart evidence, attempting to separate fact from fiction, and trying to uncover what this man actually did or didn't do. Along the way, Radiolab's Latif reflects on American values and his own religious past, and wonders how his namesake, a fellow nerdy, suburban Muslim kid, may have gone down such a strikingly different path.   Episode 3: Sudan Latif turns his focus to Sudan, where his namesake spent time working on a sunflower farm. A sunflower farm owned... by Osama bin Laden. Latif scrutinizes the evidence to try to discover whether - as Abdul Latif's lawyer insists - it was just an innocent clerical job, or whether - as the government alleges - it was what turned him into an extremist fighter.  This episode was produced by Suzie Lechtenberg, Sarah Qari, and Latif Nasser.  With help from Niza Nondo and Maaki Monem. Fact checking by Diane Kelly and Margot Williams. Editing by Jad Abumrad and Soren Wheeler. Original music by Jad Abumrad, Alex Overington, Jeremy Bloom, and Amino Belyamani.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.