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Nature Podcast | Top Science Podcasts 2020

The top science podcasts of 2020 updated daily.


Nature Podcast
The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to neuroscience, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.

Greenland's ice will melt faster than any time in the past 12,000 years
2020-09-30 08:00:26
How current and future ice loss in Greenland compares to the past, and using graphene to make ultra-sensitive radiation detectors.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
35 minutes, 4


After decades of trying, scientists coax plastic particles into a diamond-like structure
2020-09-23 08:00:25
Coaxing tiny colloid particles into a diamond structure, and manipulating cell death and homeostasis in neurodegenerative disease.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
37 minutes, 55 seconds


Genes chart Vikings' spread across Europe
2020-09-16 08:00:00
Mapping the migration of the Vikings, and the world's smallest ultrasound device.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
35 minutes, 3


A new way to cool computer chips – from within
2020-09-09 08:00:19
Keeping electronics from overheating, and how to include minority populations in genetic analyses.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
39 minutes, 5 seconds


A new way to cool computer chips - from within
2020-09-09 08:00:19
Keeping electronics from overheating, and how to include minority populations in genetic analyses.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
39 minutes, 5 seconds


Revealed: A clearer view of how general anaesthetics actually work
2020-09-02 08:00:24
Engineering yeast to produce medicines, and the mechanism of anaesthetic action.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
35 minutes, 37 seconds


The challenge of reproducing results from ten-year-old code
2020-08-26 08:00:22
Protecting delicate quantum bits, and a competition to replicate findings from ancient computer code. In this episode: 01:04 Quantum computers vs ionizing radiation The quantum bits, or 'qubits', central to the operation of quantum computers are notoriously sensitive. Now, researchers have assessed the damaging effects that ionizing radiation can have on these qubits and what can be done about it. Research Article: Vepsäläinen et al. 08:15 Coronapod We discuss the US Food and Drug Administration's decision to authorize convalescent plasma for emergency use in COVID-19 patients. As accusations of political interference fly, what might this mean for the future of the US coronavirus response? 20:39 Research Highlights Finding new populations of a long-lost elephant shrew, and the hunting method of ancient ichthyosaurs. Research Highlight: An elephant-nosed creature 'lost to science' was living just next door; Research Highlight: An extinct reptile's last meal shows it was a grip-and-tear killer 22:34 The reproducibility of computer code Many scientists have published papers based on code. Recently though, a gauntlet was thrown down for researchers to try to replicate their code, 10 years or more after they wrote it. Tech Feature: Challenge to scientists: does your ten-year-old code still run? 28:06 Briefing Chat We take a look at some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time we discuss a cancer diagnosis in a dinosaur, and how to brew yourself a career outside of academia. Science: Doctors diagnose advanced cancer–in a dinosaur; Nature Careers Feature: The brews and bakes that forged career paths outside academia Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
34 minutes, 36 seconds


3D-printing some of the world's lightest materials
2020-08-19 08:00:19
A new way to produce aerogels opens up their use, and understanding how sulfur can change state between two liquids. In this episode: 01:05 Printing aerogels Aerogels are materials with impressive insulating properties, but they're difficult to handle, due to their innate fragility. Now, researchers have shown a new way to 3D print the most common form of aerogel, opening up a range of potential new applications. Research Article: Zhao et al. 07:00 Coronapod To provide targeted public health interventions during the pandemic, it's vital that data are collected and shared effectively. We discuss the countries doing this well, and find out how fragmented systems are preventing epidemiologists from giving up-to-date information on outbreaks. 21:11 Research Highlights Fats in the blood as a possible marker of autism, and the selfish component to solar panel adoption. Research Highlight: Fats in the blood linked to autism; Research Highlight: Self-interest powers decision to go solar 23:24 Liquid-liquid transitions It's been thought that some liquids may be able to exist in two distinct states, but evidence has been scarce. Now, researchers show that sulfur can exist in two liquid states, and have discovered some insights into how this might occur. Research Article: Henry et al.; Video: 24 hours in a synchrotron 30:09 Briefing Chat We take a look at some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time we discuss the English language's dominance in science, and how to make squid transparent. Symmetry: Physics in a second language; OneZero: The First Gene-Edited Squid in History Is a Biological Breakthrough Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
37 minutes, 17 seconds


The chemical that turns locusts from Jekyll into Hyde
2020-08-12 08:37:35
Triggering swarming behaviour in locusts, and new insights into how humans synchronize.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
31 minutes, 53 seconds


Audio long-read: Pluto's dark side is overflowing with secrets
2020-08-07 08:26:19
This is an audio version of our feature: Pluto's dark side spills its secrets – including hints of a hidden ocean  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
18 minutes, 1




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Coronasomnia is a not-so-surprising side-effect of the global pandemic. More and more of us are having trouble falling asleep. We wanted to find a way to get inside that nighttime world, to see why people are awake and what they are thinking about. So what'd Radiolab decide to do?  Open up the phone lines and talk to you. We created an insomnia hotline and on this week's experimental episode, we stayed up all night, taking hundreds of calls, spilling secrets, and at long last, watching the sunrise peek through.   This episode was produced by Lulu Miller with Rachael Cusick, Tracie Hunte, Tobin Low, Sarah Qari, Molly Webster, Pat Walters, Shima Oliaee, and Jonny Moens. Want more Radiolab in your life? Sign up for our newsletter! We share our latest favorites: articles, tv shows, funny Youtube videos, chocolate chip cookie recipes, and more. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.