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09 January 2020: A look ahead at science in 2020 from Nature Podcast

From Nature Podcast - In this episode of the podcast, Nature reporter Davide Castelvecchi joins us to talk about the big science events to look out for in 2020. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Nature Podcast
The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to neuroscience, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.

09 January 2020: A look ahead at science in 2020
2020-01-08 10:01:44
In this episode of the podcast, Nature reporter Davide Castelvecchi joins us to talk about the big science events to look out for in 2020. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
10 minutes, 33 seconds


23 January: How stress can cause grey hair, and the attitude needed to tackle climate change
2020-01-22 10:01:42
23 January: How stress can cause grey hair, and the attitude needed to tackle climate change For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


16 January 2020: Strange objects at the centre of the galaxy, and improving measurements of online activity
2020-01-15 10:01:06
Strange objects at the centre of the galaxy, and improving measurements of online activity. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


09 January 2020: A look ahead at science in 2020
2020-01-08 10:01:44
In this episode of the podcast, Nature reporter Davide Castelvecchi joins us to talk about the big science events to look out for in 2020. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


01 January 2020: Our reporters' top picks of 2019
2020-01-01 07:00:00
In this special round-up episode of the Nature Podcast, our reporters choose their favourite podcast piece of 2019. In this episode: 00:33 A sole sensation A study of people who do and don't wear shoes looks into whether calluses make feet less sensitive. Nature Podcast: 26 June 2019; Research article: Holowka et al.; News and Views: Your sensitive sole 08:56 The make up of the far side of the Moon Initial observations from the first lander to touch down on the far side of the Moon. Nature Podcast: 15 May 2019; Research article: Li et al. 15:43 Growth Mindset How a one hour course could improve academic achievement. Nature Podcast: 07 August 2019; Research article: Yeager et al. 27:44 'Manferences' Nature investigates the prevalence of conferences where most of the speakers are male. Nature Podcast: 11 September 2019; News Feature: How to banish manels and manferences from scientific meetings 34:02 Q&A with Nobel Prize winner John Goodenough We talk to John Goodenough, who was jointly awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his role in the development of the lithium-ion battery. Podcast Extra: 09 October 2019 For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Nature PastCast, December 1920: The Quantum Theory
2019-12-27 07:00:00
In this episode, we're heading back to the early twentieth century, when physicists had become deeply entangled in the implications of the quantum theory. Was the world at its smallest scales continuous, or built of discrete units? It all began with Max Planck. His Nobel Prize was the subject of a Nature news article in 1920. In this episode, we're heading back to the early twentieth century, when physicists had become deeply entangled in the implications of the quantum theory. Was the world at its smallest scales continuous, or built of discrete units? It all began with Max Planck. His Nobel Prize was the subject of a Nature news article in 1920. This episode was first broadcast in December 2013. From the archive Nature 16 December 1920 For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Podcast Extra: From climate lawyer to climate activist
2019-12-23 07:01:20
In this Podcast Extra, Nature's Chief Opinion Editor Sara Abdulla meets with Farhana Yamin to discuss why she ditched resolutions in favour of activism. This is an extended version of an interview originally broadcast in September. In this Podcast Extra, Nature's Chief Opinion Editor Sara Abdulla meets with Farhana to discuss why she ditched resolutions in favour of activism. This is an extended version of an interview originally broadcast in September. Comment: Why I broke the law for climate change For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Podcast Extra: Epigenetics
2019-12-20 07:01:00
As part of Nature's 150th anniversary celebrations, Nick Howe dives into the topic of epigenetics. Since its origin in 1942, the term 'epigenetics' has been repeatedly defined and redefined. There's always been hype around the field, but what actually is epigenetics and how much does it influence our genes? In this Podcast Extra, Nick Howe speaks to Edith Heard, Director General of the EMBL, and Giacomo Cavalli, from the Institute of Human Genetics, to guide us through these questions and find out about the history and future of epigenetics. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


19 December 2019: A solution to the three-body problem, and festive fun
2019-12-18 10:01:08
We've launched our 2019 listener survey. We want to know what you think of the show to help us make a great podcast. You can find the survey here. Thanks! This week, a solution to a centuries-old physics problem, and holiday shenanigans. In this episode: 00:51 Disentangling three bodies A problem that has stumped scientists since the 1600s has a probabilistic solution. Research Article: Stone and Leigh 08:50 Frosty the Snowman The first of our festive science songs, about how a certain snowman is faring under climate change. Scroll to the transcript section below for the lyrics. 11:00 Festive quiz show Our reporters battle it out to be crowned as this year's quiz champion. Can they describe some of the top news headlines without saying certain important words? We find out. 19:21 Carol of M87 Our second song is about the Event Horizon Telescope collaboration's imaging of the supermassive black hole at the centre of the M87 galaxy. Scroll to the transcript section below for the lyrics. 20:33 News Chat We hear about some of the people on Nature's 10 this year. Feature: Nature's 10: Ten people who mattered this year 30:00 Rockin' Around Supremacy For our final song, we hark back to October, when Google claimed to have achieved quantum supremacy. Scroll to the transcript section below for the lyrics. TRANSCRIPT Frosty the Snowman lyrics: Frosty the Snowman was a jolly, happy soul But the smile wore off as the globe got hot 'Cause the world used too much coal. Frosty the Snowman is a fairy tale they say He was made of snow But the kids won't know 'cause it's them who have to pay. Gonna' need some magic to Convince the world to stop 'Cause now we're running out of time And he's feeling mighty hot. Oh, Frosty the Snowman, is endangered as could be And the children say they wish he'd stay, But they don't trust you and me. He led them down the streets of town Right to the climate COP. They gathered there, and Greta stared And together hollered "STOP". Frosty the Snowman, had to hurry on his way But he said we should do all that we could For to change our dirty ways. Frosty the Snowman, knew the time to act was now So the girls and boys said make some noise And we'll get a change somehow Carol of M87 lyrics: Hark at the sound Photons abound Radio waves All seem to say Out in the dark This glowing spark We find our goal See a black hole. (M) M Eight-se'en (Eight) As it was then (tee) eons ago (se'en) See it aglow Data from these Observatries Processed to give The first image One seems to see With EHT Fire in a ring Light circling Einstein was right, Warped is the light, See the lensing Bending the ring. Now-we see-a supermassive black hole. (M - eigh-ty- se'en) How-we see-a supermassive black hole. (M - eigh-ty-se'en) (M) Space time is bent (Eight) See this event (tee) Horizon burn (ee) So much to learn (se'en) Out in the dark This glowing spark We find our goal See a black hole. Rockin' Around Supremacy lyrics: Rockin' around supremacy With the latest quantum chip Google says it won the race IBM says it's a blip. Rockin' around supremacy Would a regular PC Really take 1000 years? There's no time to wait and see! You will get a futuristic feeling when you hear Voices raised in praise of physics Deck the halls with 54 qubits. Rockin' around supremacy Is the hype just overblown? There's more to do but either way It's quantum milestone! You will get a futuristic feeling when you hear Voices raised in praise of physics Deck the halls with 54 qubits. Rockin' around supremacy Is the hype just overblown? There's more to do but either way It's quantum mi-le-stone! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


19 December 2019: The three-body problem, and festive fun
2019-12-18 10:01:08
We've launched our 2019 listener survey. We want to know what you think of the show to help us make a great podcast. You can find the survey here. Thanks! This week, a solution to a centuries-old physics problem, and holiday shenanigans. In this episode: 00:51 Disentangling three bodies Researchers have been working to unpick a problem that has stumped scientists since the 1600s. Research Article: Stone and Leigh 08:50 Frosty the Snowman The first of our festive science songs, about how a certain snowman is faring under climate change. Scroll to the transcript section below for the lyrics. 11:00 Festive quiz show Our reporters battle it out to be crowned as this year's quiz champion. Can they describe some of the top news headlines without saying certain important words? We find out. 19:21 Carol of M87 Our second song is about the Event Horizon Telescope collaboration's imaging of the supermassive black hole at the centre of the M87 galaxy. Scroll to the transcript section below for the lyrics. 20:33 News Chat We hear about some of the people on Nature's 10 this year. Feature: Nature's 10: Ten people who mattered this year 30:00 Rockin' Around Supremacy For our final song, we hark back to October, when Google claimed to have achieved quantum supremacy. Scroll to the transcript section below for the lyrics. TRANSCRIPT Frosty the Snowman lyrics: Frosty the Snowman was a jolly, happy soul But the smile wore off as the globe got hot 'Cause the world used too much coal. Frosty the Snowman is a fairy tale they say He was made of snow But the kids won't know 'cause it's them who have to pay. Gonna' need some magic to Convince the world to stop 'Cause now we're running out of time And he's feeling mighty hot. Oh, Frosty the Snowman, is endangered as could be And the children say they wish he'd stay, But they don't trust you and me. He led them down the streets of town Right to the climate COP. They gathered there, and Greta stared And together hollered "STOP". Frosty the Snowman, had to hurry on his way But he said we should do all that we could For to change our dirty ways. Frosty the Snowman, knew the time to act was now So the girls and boys said make some noise And we'll get a change somehow Carol of M87 lyrics: Hark at the sound Photons abound Radio waves All seem to say Out in the dark This glowing spark We find our goal See a black hole. (M) M Eight-se'en (Eight) As it was then (tee) eons ago (se'en) See it aglow Data from these Observatries Processed to give The first image One seems to see With EHT Fire in a ring Light circling Einstein was right, Warped is the light, See the lensing Bending the ring. Now-we see-a supermassive black hole. (M - eigh-ty- se'en) How-we see-a supermassive black hole. (M - eigh-ty-se'en) (M) Space time is bent (Eight) See this event (tee) Horizon burn (ee) So much to learn (se'en) Out in the dark This glowing spark We find our goal See a black hole. Rockin' Around Supremacy lyrics: Rockin' around supremacy With the latest quantum chip Google says it won the race IBM says it's a blip. Rockin' around supremacy Would a regular PC Really take 1000 years? There's no time to wait and see! You will get a futuristic feeling when you hear Voices raised in praise of physics Deck the halls with 54 qubits. Rockin' around supremacy Is the hype just overblown? There's more to do but either way It's quantum milestone! You will get a futuristic feeling when you hear Voices raised in praise of physics Deck the halls with 54 qubits. Rockin' around supremacy Is the hype just overblown? There's more to do but either way It's quantum mi-le-stone! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Long Read Podcast: How to save coral reefs as the world warms
2019-12-16 08:17:41
Research groups around the world are exploring new ways of protecting coral reefs from climate change. This is an audio version of our feature: These corals could survive climate change — and help save the world's reefs. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


12 December 2019: Social priming, and acoustic science
2019-12-11 10:01:54
This week, the embattled field of social priming, and the latest sounds from a big acoustic meeting. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


05 December 2019: Genomic sequencing and the source of solar winds
2019-12-04 10:21:53
This week, exploring two very different issues with genomic sequencing, and the latest results from NASA's Parker Solar Probe. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Nature Pastcast, November 1869: The first issue of Nature
2019-11-29 03:11:22
In this episode, we're heading back to 4 November 1869, when Nature's story began. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


28 November 2019: Nature's 2019 PhD survey, and older women in sci-fi novels
2019-11-27 10:01:08
This week, delving into the results of the latest graduate student survey, and assessing ageism in science fiction literature. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


21 November 2019: A new antibiotic from nematode guts, grant funding 'lotteries', and butterfly genomes
2019-11-20 10:01:40
This week, an antibiotic that targets hard-to-treat bacteria, and a roundup of the latest science news. In this episode: 00:49 Discovering darobactin Researchers looked inside nematode guts and have identified a new antibiotic with some useful properties. Research Article: Imai et al. 05:45 Research Highlights Using urine as a health metric, and sniffing out book decay with an electronic nose. Research Article: Miller et al.; Research Article: Veríssimo et al. 07:54 News Chat Adding an element of chance to grant funding, a continental butterfly-sequencing project, and tracking endangered animals via traces of their DNA. News: Science funders gamble on grant lotteries; News: Every butterfly in the United States and Canada now has a genome sequence; News: Rare bird's detection highlights promise of 'environmental DNA' For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


14 November 2019: A rapid, multi-material 3D printer, and a bacterium's role in alcoholic hepatitis
2019-11-13 10:01:53
This week, a new 3D printer allows quick shifting between many materials, and understanding the link between gut microbes and liver disease. 00:46 A new dimension for 3D printers A new nozzle lets a 3D printer switch between materials at a rapid rate, opening the door to a range of applications. Research Article: Skylar-Scott et al.; News and Views: How to print multi-material devices in one go 08:07 Research Highlights The slippery secrets of ice, and cells wrapping up their nuclei. Research Highlight: Viscous water holds the secret to an ice skater's smooth glide; Research Highlight: Super-thin layer of 'bubble wrap' cushions a cell's nucleus 10:17 Linking bacteria to liver disease Researchers have isolated a bacterial strain that appears to play an important role in alcoholic liver disease. Research paper: Duan et al.; News and Views: Microbial clues to a liver disease 17:10 News Chat 'Megaconstellations' of satellites concern astronomers, and a report on the gender gap in chemistry. News: SpaceX launch highlights threat to astronomy from 'megaconstellations'; News: Huge study documents gender gap in chemistry publishing For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Backchat: Nature's 150th anniversary
2019-11-07 10:01:30
This week marks 150 years since the first issue of Nature was published, on 4 November 1869. In this anniversary edition of Backchat, the panel take a look back at how the journal has evolved in this time, and discuss the role that Nature can play in today's society. The panel also pick a few of their favourite research papers that Nature has published, and think about where science might be headed in the next 150 years. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


07 November 2019: The fossil of an upright ape, science in 150 years, and immunization progress around the world
2019-11-06 10:01:35
This week, insights into the evolution of walking upright, how science needs to change in the next 150 years, and the unfinished agenda for vaccines. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Nature Pastcast, October 1993: Carl Sagan uses Galileo to search for signs of life
2019-10-31 10:00:18
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we're rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science. In the early 1990s, a team of astrophysicists led by Carl Sagan looked at data from the Galileo spacecraft and saw the signatures of life on a planet in our galaxy. Historian of science David Kaiser and astrobiologists Charles Cockell and Frank Drake discuss how we can tell if there is life beyond the Earth - and how optimism, as well as science, is necessary for such a venture. This episode was first broadcast in October 2013. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


31 October 2019: An AI masters the video game StarCraft II, and measuring arthropod abundance
2019-10-30 11:01:19
This week, a computer beats the best human players in StarCraft II, and a huge study of insects and other arthropods. In this episode: 00:45 Learning to play By studying and experimenting, an AI has reached Grandmaster level at the video game Starcraft II. Research Article: Vinyals et al.; News Article: Google AI beats experienced human players at real-time strategy game StarCraft II 10:08 Research Highlights A record-breaking lightning bolt, and identifying our grey matter's favourite tunes Research Highlight: Here come the lightning 'megaflashes'; Research Highlight: Why some songs delight the human brain 12:24 Arthropods in decline Researchers have surveyed how land-use change has affected arthropod diversity.  Research article: Seibold et al. 18:30 News Chat Young Canadians file a lawsuit against their government, an Alzheimer's drug gets a second chance, and South Korean efforts to curb a viral epidemic in pigs.  News: Canadian kids sue government over climate change; News: Fresh push for 'failed' Alzheimer's drug; News: South Korea deploys snipers and drones to fend off deadly pig virus For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Podcast Extra: Detecting gravitational waves
2019-10-28 08:00:00
As part of Nature's 150th anniversary celebrations, we look back at an important moment in the history of science. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


24 October 2019: Quantum supremacy and ancient mammals
2019-10-23 10:01:21
This week, a milestone in quantum computing, and rethinking early mammals. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


17 October 2019: Mapping childhood mortality, and evolving 'de novo' genes
2019-10-16 10:01:26
This week, investigating child mortality rates at a local level, and building genes from non-coding DNA. In this episode: 00:43 A regional view of childhood mortality Researchers map countries' progress towards the UN's Sustainable Developmental Goals.  Research Article: Burstein et al.; World View: Data on child deaths are a call for justice; Editorial: Protect the census 07:22 Research Highlights Astronomers identify a second visitor from beyond the solar system, and extreme snowfall stifles animal breeding in Greenland.  Research Highlight: The comet that came in from interstellar space; Research Highlight: Extreme winter leads to an Arctic reproductive collapse 09:22 Evolving genes from the ground up Natural selection's creative way to evolve new genes.  News Feature: How evolution builds genes from scratch 15:43 News Chat A spate of vaping-related deaths in the US, and Japan's import of the Ebola virus.  News: Scientists chase cause of mysterious vaping illness as death toll rises; News: Why Japan imported Ebola ahead of the 2020 Olympics For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


10 October 2019: Estimating earthquake risk, and difficulties for deep-learning
2019-10-09 10:01:59
This week, a method for predicting follow-up earthquakes, and the issues with deep learning systems in AI. In this episode: 00:47 Which is the big quake? A new technique could allow seismologists to better predict if a larger earthquake will follow an initial tremor.  Research Article: Real-time discrimination of earthquake foreshocks and aftershocks; News and Views: Predicting if the worst earthquake has passed 07:46 Research Highlights Vampire bats transmitting rabies in Costa Rica, and why are some octopuses warty?  Research Article: Streicker et al.; Research Article: Voight et al. 10:03 Problems for pattern-recognition Deep-learning allows AIs to better understand the world, but the technique is not without its issues.  News Feature: Why deep-learning AIs are so easy to fool 16:31 News Chat We roundup the 2019 Nobel Prizes for science.  News: Biologists who decoded how cells sense oxygen win medicine Nobel; News: Physics Nobel goes to exoplanet and cosmology pioneers; News: Chemistry Nobel honours world-changing batteries For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Podcast Extra: Q&A with Nobel Prize winner John B Goodenough
2019-10-09 09:37:39
In this Podcast Extra, we speak to John B Goodenough, from the University of Texas at Austin in the US. Today, John was announced as one of the joint winners of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Reporter Benjamin Thompson went along to the Royal Society in London to chat with him. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Guy's Favorites: What Is Original?
As we transition to our new host Manoush Zomorodi, Guy Raz looks back on some of his favorite episodes from his seven years hosting the TED Radio Hour. This episode originally aired on June 27, 2014. When is copying flattery, when is it thievery, and when is it sheer genius? In this hour, TED speakers explore how sampling, borrowing, and riffing make all of us innovators.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#548 Land and Ocean Conservation 101
This week we're talking about land and ocean conservation: what it means to protect our land and oceans, the complexities of competing interests and international boundries, and how well Canada is doing at conserving its most important wild areas. Helping us wrap our heads around it are National Parks Program Director Alison Ronson and National Oceans Program Director Candace Newman from the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS). This episode is hosted by Rachelle Saunders. Related links and resources: 2019 Parks and Protected Areas Report 2019 Oceans Report 2019 Climate Change Report 2019 Successes Blog Aichi Biodiversity Targets IPBES Global...
Now Playing: Radiolab

Body Count
Right now, at this very moment, all across the planet, there are 7.6 billion human beings eating, breathing, sleeping, brushing their teeth, walking their dogs, drinking coffee, walking down the street or running onto the subway or hopping in their car, maybe reading a summary of a podcast they're about to hit play on ... and the number is only going up. Everyday 386,000 babies are born (16,000 an hour). We're adding a billion new people every 12 years. So here's a question you've probably never thought about: Are there more people alive right now than have ever lived on the planet in history? Do the living outnumber the dead? Robert got obsessed with this odd question, and in this episode we bring you the answer. Or, well, answers. This episode was reported by Robert Krulwich and produced by Annie McEwen and Pat Walters, with help from Neel Danesha. Fact-checking by Michelle Harris. Music and mixing by Jeremy Bloom. Special thanks to Jeffrey Dobereiner. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.