29 August 2019: Carbon-based computing, and depleting ancient-human genomes from Nature Podcast

From Nature Podcast - This week, a computer chip based on carbon nanotubes, and the potential pitfalls of sequencing ancient-human remains. In this episode:   00:45 A nanotube microprocessor Scientists are looking beyond silicon, by constructing a computer chip using carbon nanotubes. Research article: Shulaker et al. News and Views: Nanotube computer scaled up   08:38 Research Highlights Weighing neutrinos, and discovering a hidden Zika epidemic. Research Highlight: Lightest neutrino is at least 6 million times lighter than an electron; Research Highlight: Cuba's untold Zika outbreak uncovered   10:29 Using ancient-human remains conscientiously While genetic sequencing of ancient-human remains is providing more information than ever, these remains must be safeguarded, warn researchers. Comment Article: Use ancient remains more wisely   17:21 News Chat The discovery of a 3.8-million-year-old hominin skull, and using CRISPR to make 'smart' materials. News: Rare 3.8-million-year-old skull recasts origins of iconic 'Lucy' fossil News: CRISPR cuts turn gels into biological watchdogs For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
29 August 2019: Carbon-based computing, and depleting ancient-human genomes
2019-08-28 10:01:30
This week, a computer chip based on carbon nanotubes, and the potential pitfalls of sequencing ancient-human remains. In this episode:   00:45 A nanotube microprocessor Scientists are looking beyond silicon, by constructing a computer chip using carbon nanotubes. Research article: Shulaker et al. News and Views: Nanotube computer scaled up   08:38 Research Highlights Weighing neutrinos, and discovering a hidden Zika epidemic. Research Highlight: Lightest neutrino is at least 6 million times lighter than an electron; Research Highlight: Cuba's untold Zika outbreak uncovered   10:29 Using ancient-human remains conscientiously While genetic sequencing of ancient-human remains is providing more information than ever, these remains must be safeguarded, warn researchers. Comment Article: Use ancient remains more wisely   17:21 News Chat The discovery of a 3.8-million-year-old hominin skull, and using CRISPR to make 'smart' materials. News: Rare 3.8-million-year-old skull recasts origins of iconic 'Lucy' fossil News: CRISPR cuts turn gels into biological watchdogs For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

26 minutes, 8 seconds

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