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04 July 2019: Machine learning in materials science, and sand's sustainability from Nature Podcast

From Nature Podcast - This week, using an algorithm to find properties in materials science, and the global consequences of sand-mining. In this episode: 00:47 Predicting properties A word-association algorithm is reading millions of abstracts to discover new properties of materials.  Research article: Tshitoyan et al.; News and Views: Text mining facilitates materials discovery 08:28 Research Highlights Tiny robot-jellyfish, and genome mutation hot-spots.  Research Article:Multi-functional soft-bodied jellyfish-like swimming; Research Highlight:How DNA 'hotspots' snarl the search for cancer genes 10:48 Sand under strain Researchers warn that the mining of sand is unsustainable.  Comment:Time is running out for sand 15:44 News Chat The results of a bullying survey, and the spread of microbial disease through opioid use.  News: Germany's prestigious Max Planck Society conducts huge bullying survey; News: The US opioid epidemic is driving a spike in infectious diseases For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Nature Podcast
The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to neuroscience, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.

04 July 2019: Machine learning in materials science, and sand's sustainability
2019-07-03 10:01:30
This week, using an algorithm to find properties in materials science, and the global consequences of sand-mining. In this episode: 00:47 Predicting properties A word-association algorithm is reading millions of abstracts to discover new properties of materials.  Research article: Tshitoyan et al.; News and Views: Text mining facilitates materials discovery 08:28 Research Highlights Tiny robot-jellyfish, and genome mutation hot-spots.  Research Article:Multi-functional soft-bodied jellyfish-like swimming; Research Highlight:How DNA 'hotspots' snarl the search for cancer genes 10:48 Sand under strain Researchers warn that the mining of sand is unsustainable.  Comment:Time is running out for sand 15:44 News Chat The results of a bullying survey, and the spread of microbial disease through opioid use.  News: Germany's prestigious Max Planck Society conducts huge bullying survey; News: The US opioid epidemic is driving a spike in infectious diseases For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
23 minutes, 6 seconds


05 December 2019: Genomic sequencing and the source of solar winds
2019-12-04 10:21:53
This week, exploring two very different issues with genomic sequencing, and the latest results from NASA's Parker Solar Probe. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Nature Pastcast, November 1869: The first issue of Nature
2019-11-29 03:11:22
In this episode, we're heading back to 4 November 1869, when Nature's story began. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


28 November 2019: Nature's 2019 PhD survey, and older women in sci-fi novels
2019-11-27 10:01:08
This week, delving into the results of the latest graduate student survey, and assessing ageism in science fiction literature. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


21 November 2019: A new antibiotic from nematode guts, grant funding 'lotteries', and butterfly genomes
2019-11-20 10:01:40
This week, an antibiotic that targets hard-to-treat bacteria, and a roundup of the latest science news. In this episode: 00:49 Discovering darobactin Researchers looked inside nematode guts and have identified a new antibiotic with some useful properties. Research Article: Imai et al. 05:45 Research Highlights Using urine as a health metric, and sniffing out book decay with an electronic nose. Research Article: Miller et al.; Research Article: Veríssimo et al. 07:54 News Chat Adding an element of chance to grant funding, a continental butterfly-sequencing project, and tracking endangered animals via traces of their DNA. News: Science funders gamble on grant lotteries; News: Every butterfly in the United States and Canada now has a genome sequence; News: Rare bird's detection highlights promise of 'environmental DNA' For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


14 November 2019: A rapid, multi-material 3D printer, and a bacterium's role in alcoholic hepatitis
2019-11-13 10:01:53
This week, a new 3D printer allows quick shifting between many materials, and understanding the link between gut microbes and liver disease. 00:46 A new dimension for 3D printers A new nozzle lets a 3D printer switch between materials at a rapid rate, opening the door to a range of applications. Research Article: Skylar-Scott et al.; News and Views: How to print multi-material devices in one go 08:07 Research Highlights The slippery secrets of ice, and cells wrapping up their nuclei. Research Highlight: Viscous water holds the secret to an ice skater's smooth glide; Research Highlight: Super-thin layer of 'bubble wrap' cushions a cell's nucleus 10:17 Linking bacteria to liver disease Researchers have isolated a bacterial strain that appears to play an important role in alcoholic liver disease. Research paper: Duan et al.; News and Views: Microbial clues to a liver disease 17:10 News Chat 'Megaconstellations' of satellites concern astronomers, and a report on the gender gap in chemistry. News: SpaceX launch highlights threat to astronomy from 'megaconstellations'; News: Huge study documents gender gap in chemistry publishing For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Backchat: Nature's 150th anniversary
2019-11-07 10:01:30
This week marks 150 years since the first issue of Nature was published, on 4 November 1869. In this anniversary edition of Backchat, the panel take a look back at how the journal has evolved in this time, and discuss the role that Nature can play in today's society. The panel also pick a few of their favourite research papers that Nature has published, and think about where science might be headed in the next 150 years. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


07 November 2019: The fossil of an upright ape, science in 150 years, and immunization progress around the world
2019-11-06 10:01:35
This week, insights into the evolution of walking upright, how science needs to change in the next 150 years, and the unfinished agenda for vaccines. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Nature Pastcast, October 1993: Carl Sagan uses Galileo to search for signs of life
2019-10-31 10:00:18
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we're rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science. In the early 1990s, a team of astrophysicists led by Carl Sagan looked at data from the Galileo spacecraft and saw the signatures of life on a planet in our galaxy. Historian of science David Kaiser and astrobiologists Charles Cockell and Frank Drake discuss how we can tell if there is life beyond the Earth - and how optimism, as well as science, is necessary for such a venture. This episode was first broadcast in October 2013. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


31 October 2019: An AI masters the video game StarCraft II, and measuring arthropod abundance
2019-10-30 11:01:19
This week, a computer beats the best human players in StarCraft II, and a huge study of insects and other arthropods. In this episode: 00:45 Learning to play By studying and experimenting, an AI has reached Grandmaster level at the video game Starcraft II. Research Article: Vinyals et al.; News Article: Google AI beats experienced human players at real-time strategy game StarCraft II 10:08 Research Highlights A record-breaking lightning bolt, and identifying our grey matter's favourite tunes Research Highlight: Here come the lightning 'megaflashes'; Research Highlight: Why some songs delight the human brain 12:24 Arthropods in decline Researchers have surveyed how land-use change has affected arthropod diversity.  Research article: Seibold et al. 18:30 News Chat Young Canadians file a lawsuit against their government, an Alzheimer's drug gets a second chance, and South Korean efforts to curb a viral epidemic in pigs.  News: Canadian kids sue government over climate change; News: Fresh push for 'failed' Alzheimer's drug; News: South Korea deploys snipers and drones to fend off deadly pig virus For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Podcast Extra: Detecting gravitational waves
2019-10-28 08:00:00
As part of Nature's 150th anniversary celebrations, we look back at an important moment in the history of science. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


24 October 2019: Quantum supremacy and ancient mammals
2019-10-23 10:01:21
This week, a milestone in quantum computing, and rethinking early mammals. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


17 October 2019: Mapping childhood mortality, and evolving 'de novo' genes
2019-10-16 10:01:26
This week, investigating child mortality rates at a local level, and building genes from non-coding DNA. In this episode: 00:43 A regional view of childhood mortality Researchers map countries' progress towards the UN's Sustainable Developmental Goals.  Research Article: Burstein et al.; World View: Data on child deaths are a call for justice; Editorial: Protect the census 07:22 Research Highlights Astronomers identify a second visitor from beyond the solar system, and extreme snowfall stifles animal breeding in Greenland.  Research Highlight: The comet that came in from interstellar space; Research Highlight: Extreme winter leads to an Arctic reproductive collapse 09:22 Evolving genes from the ground up Natural selection's creative way to evolve new genes.  News Feature: How evolution builds genes from scratch 15:43 News Chat A spate of vaping-related deaths in the US, and Japan's import of the Ebola virus.  News: Scientists chase cause of mysterious vaping illness as death toll rises; News: Why Japan imported Ebola ahead of the 2020 Olympics For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


10 October 2019: Estimating earthquake risk, and difficulties for deep-learning
2019-10-09 10:01:59
This week, a method for predicting follow-up earthquakes, and the issues with deep learning systems in AI. In this episode: 00:47 Which is the big quake? A new technique could allow seismologists to better predict if a larger earthquake will follow an initial tremor.  Research Article: Real-time discrimination of earthquake foreshocks and aftershocks; News and Views: Predicting if the worst earthquake has passed 07:46 Research Highlights Vampire bats transmitting rabies in Costa Rica, and why are some octopuses warty?  Research Article: Streicker et al.; Research Article: Voight et al. 10:03 Problems for pattern-recognition Deep-learning allows AIs to better understand the world, but the technique is not without its issues.  News Feature: Why deep-learning AIs are so easy to fool 16:31 News Chat We roundup the 2019 Nobel Prizes for science.  News: Biologists who decoded how cells sense oxygen win medicine Nobel; News: Physics Nobel goes to exoplanet and cosmology pioneers; News: Chemistry Nobel honours world-changing batteries For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Podcast Extra: Q&A with Nobel Prize winner John B Goodenough
2019-10-09 09:37:39
In this Podcast Extra, we speak to John B Goodenough, from the University of Texas at Austin in the US. Today, John was announced as one of the joint winners of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Reporter Benjamin Thompson went along to the Royal Society in London to chat with him. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Podcast Extra: Q&A with Nobel Prize winner Didier Queloz
2019-10-08 11:03:38
In this Podcast Extra, we speak to physicist Didier Queloz, who was announced today as one of the joint winners of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics. Shortly after the winners were announced, Didier took part in a press conference to talk about his award. Reporter Benjamin Thompson went along to chat with him. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


03 October 2019: Leapfrogging speciation, and migrating mosquitoes
2019-10-02 10:00:37
This week, how new species may form by sexual imprinting, and a previously unknown way for mosquitoes to migrate. In this episode: 00:43 New species by sexual imprinting? A Central American frog chooses mates resembling its parents, a possible route for new species to form.  Research Article: Yang et al.; News and Views: Leapfrog to speciation boosted by mother's influence 09:58 Research Highlights A light-based pacemaker, and the mathematics of the best place to park.  Research Article: Mei et al.; Research Highlight: Maths tackles an eternal question: where to park? 11:43 Gone with the wind Researchers show that malaria mosquitoes may travel hundreds of kilometres using wind currents.  Research Article: Huestis et al.; News and Views: Malaria mosquitoes go with the flow 19:28 News Chat Eradication of Guinea Worm pushed back, and researchers report 'pressure to cite'.  News: Exclusive: Battle to wipe out debilitating Guinea worm parasite hits 10 year delay; News: Two-thirds of researchers report 'pressure to cite' in Nature poll For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Nature PastCast, September 1963: Plate tectonics - the unifying theory of Earth sciences
2019-09-27 08:00:00
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we're rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science. Earthquakes, volcanoes, the formation of mountains; we understand all these phenomena in terms of plate tectonics (large-scale movements of the Earth's crust). But when a German geologist first suggested that continents move, in the 1910s, people dismissed it as a wild idea. In this podcast, we hear how a 'wild idea' became the unifying theory of Earth sciences. In the 1960s, data showed that the sea floor was spreading, pushing continents apart. Fred Vine recalls the reaction when he published these findings in Nature. This episode was first broadcast in September 2013. From the archive Magnetic Anomalies Over Oceanic Ridges, by Vine & Matthews For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


26 September 2019: Mysteries of the ancient mantle, and the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy
2019-09-25 10:01:01
This week, diamond-containing rocks may help uncover secrets of the Earth's mantle, and a reflection on science since the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy was published. In this episode: 00:46 Earth's Evolution Explosive eruptions have allowed researchers to study Earth's mysterious mantle.  Research Article: Woodhead et al.; News and Views: Enigmatic origin of diamond-bearing rocks revealed 06:08 Research Highlights Supersonic cork popping, and the timing of vaccines.  Research Highlight: An uncorked champagne bottle imitates a fighter jet; Research Highlight: Why midday might be a golden hour for vaccinations 07:53 Don't Panic 40 years since the publication of the 'Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy' we reflect on how far science has come. 15:22 News Chat A huge telescope with exquisite sensitivity is opening in China, and gene-editing to save bananas. News: Gigantic Chinese telescope opens to astronomers worldwide; News: CRISPR might be the banana's only hope against a deadly fungus For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Podcast Extra: Absurd scientific advice
2019-09-21 10:00:39
How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems is the new book from XKCD cartoonist Randall Munroe. In this Podcast Extra, Randall talks about the book, its inspiration and the bizarre thought experiments it contains. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Backchat: Covering Climate Now
2019-09-19 10:00:28
In this episode: 00:44 A global media collaboration This week, Nature is taking part in the Covering Climate Now project. What is it, and why has Nature joined? Editorial: Act now and avert a climate crisis 05:49 'Climate change' vs 'climate emergency' In early 2019, The Guardian changed the wording they use when covering climate stories. Our panel discusses the importance of phrasing, and how it evolves. The Guardian: Why the Guardian is changing the language it uses about the environment 13:40 Choosing climate images What makes a good image for a climate change story? What do they add to a written news story? This episode of the Backchat is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 250 media outlets to highlight the issue of climate change. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


19 September 2019: XKCD, and Extinction Rebellion
2019-09-18 10:01:14
This week, absurd advice from XKCD's Randall Munroe, and a conversation climate lawyer turned activist Farhana Yamin. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


12 September 2019: Modelling early embryos, and male-dominated conferences
2019-09-11 10:01:47
This week, modelling embryonic development, and an analysis of male dominated conferences. In this episode: 00:44 Imitating implantation Researchers have created a system that uses stem cells to model the early stages of pregnancy.  Research article: Zheng et al.; News and Views: Human embryo implantation modelled in microfluidic channels 08:03 Research Highlights Traces of baby turtle tracks, and Titan's explosive past.  Research Highlight: A baby sea turtle's ancient trek is captured in a fossil; Research Highlight: Giant explosions sculpted a moon's peculiar scenery 09:36 'Manferences' Nature investigates the prevalence of conferences where most of the speakers are male.  News Feature: How to banish manels and manferences from scientific meetings 15:41 News Chat An update on India's latest moon mission, drugs that may reverse biological age, and this year's Breakthrough Prize winners.  News: India loses contact with its Moon lander minutes before touchdown; News: First hint that body's 'biological age' can be reversed; News: First-ever picture of a black hole scoops US$3-million prize For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


05 September 2019: Persistent antibiotic resistance, and modeling hot cities
2019-09-04 10:01:20
This week, Salmonella spreading antibiotic resistance, and the drivers of urban heat islands. In this episode:   00:46 Antibiotic resistance reservoirs Researchers have identified how Salmonella 'persister' cells can spread antibiotic resistance genes in mice intestines. Research article: Bakkeren et al. 08:12 Research Highlights Bright barn owls stun prey, and the evolution of dog brains.  Research Highlight: Zip-lining owls reveal what really scares their prey; Research Highlight: A dog's breed is a window onto its brain 10:13 Urban heating Cities are generally hotter than their surroundings, but what are the causes of these 'heat islands'?  Research Article: Manoli et al. 16:54 News Chat A cryptic Russian radiation spike, and India's moon mission gets closer to touchdown.  News: How nuclear scientists are decoding Russia's mystery explosion; News: 'The most terrifying moments': India counts down to risky Moon landing For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Nature PastCast, August 1975: Antibodies' ascendency to blockbuster drug status
2019-08-30 06:20:36
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we're rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science. They're found in home-testing kits for pregnancy, hospital tests for MRSA, and in six out of ten of the best-selling drugs today. But monoclonal antibodies have kept a surprisingly low profile since their debut in a Nature paper in 1975. This podcast follows them from that time through patent wars, promising drug trials and finally to blockbuster status today. This episode was first broadcast in August 2013. From the archive: Continuous cultures of fused cells secreting antibody of predefined specificity, by Köhler & Milstein Margaret Thatcher speech clips courtesy of the Margaret Thatcher Foundation. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


29 August 2019: Carbon-based computing, and depleting ancient-human genomes
2019-08-28 10:01:30
This week, a computer chip based on carbon nanotubes, and the potential pitfalls of sequencing ancient-human remains. In this episode:   00:45 A nanotube microprocessor Scientists are looking beyond silicon, by constructing a computer chip using carbon nanotubes. Research article: Shulaker et al. News and Views: Nanotube computer scaled up   08:38 Research Highlights Weighing neutrinos, and discovering a hidden Zika epidemic. Research Highlight: Lightest neutrino is at least 6 million times lighter than an electron; Research Highlight: Cuba's untold Zika outbreak uncovered   10:29 Using ancient-human remains conscientiously While genetic sequencing of ancient-human remains is providing more information than ever, these remains must be safeguarded, warn researchers. Comment Article: Use ancient remains more wisely   17:21 News Chat The discovery of a 3.8-million-year-old hominin skull, and using CRISPR to make 'smart' materials. News: Rare 3.8-million-year-old skull recasts origins of iconic 'Lucy' fossil News: CRISPR cuts turn gels into biological watchdogs For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


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