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01 January 2020: Our reporters' top picks of 2019 from Nature Podcast

From Nature Podcast - In this special round-up episode of the Nature Podcast, our reporters choose their favourite podcast piece of 2019. In this episode: 00:33 A sole sensation A study of people who do and don't wear shoes looks into whether calluses make feet less sensitive. Nature Podcast: 26 June 2019; Research article: Holowka et al.; News and Views: Your sensitive sole 08:56 The make up of the far side of the Moon Initial observations from the first lander to touch down on the far side of the Moon. Nature Podcast: 15 May 2019; Research article: Li et al. 15:43 Growth Mindset How a one hour course could improve academic achievement. Nature Podcast: 07 August 2019; Research article: Yeager et al. 27:44 'Manferences' Nature investigates the prevalence of conferences where most of the speakers are male. Nature Podcast: 11 September 2019; News Feature: How to banish manels and manferences from scientific meetings 34:02 Q&A with Nobel Prize winner John Goodenough We talk to John Goodenough, who was jointly awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his role in the development of the lithium-ion battery. Podcast Extra: 09 October 2019 For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Nature Podcast
The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to neuroscience, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.

01 January 2020: Our reporters' top picks of 2019
2020-01-01 07:00:00
In this special round-up episode of the Nature Podcast, our reporters choose their favourite podcast piece of 2019. In this episode: 00:33 A sole sensation A study of people who do and don't wear shoes looks into whether calluses make feet less sensitive. Nature Podcast: 26 June 2019; Research article: Holowka et al.; News and Views: Your sensitive sole 08:56 The make up of the far side of the Moon Initial observations from the first lander to touch down on the far side of the Moon. Nature Podcast: 15 May 2019; Research article: Li et al. 15:43 Growth Mindset How a one hour course could improve academic achievement. Nature Podcast: 07 August 2019; Research article: Yeager et al. 27:44 'Manferences' Nature investigates the prevalence of conferences where most of the speakers are male. Nature Podcast: 11 September 2019; News Feature: How to banish manels and manferences from scientific meetings 34:02 Q&A with Nobel Prize winner John Goodenough We talk to John Goodenough, who was jointly awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his role in the development of the lithium-ion battery. Podcast Extra: 09 October 2019 For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
38 minutes, 5


Coronapod: Old treatments and new hopes
2020-03-27 10:23:32
Benjamin Thompson, Noah Baker, and Amy Maxmen discuss efforts to develop treatments for COVID-19. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


25 March 2020: Ultra-fast electrical switches, and computing heart health
2020-03-25 09:00:00
This week, a speedy, yet simple switch, and a video-based AI helps assess heart health. In this episode: 01:57 Speedy switches Researchers have developed an ultra-fast electrical switch that they hope can be used in communication and imaging applications. Research Article: Nikoo et al. 08:14 Research Highlights Using sound to estimate glacial retreat, and building a dodgier drone. Research Highlight: Underwater microphones listen as as glacier retreats; Research article: Falanga et al. 10:32 Algorithmic heart diagnosis Scientists have developed a new algorithm which calculates the amount of blood pumped by the heart beat by beat. Research Article: Ouyang et al.; News and Views: AI tracks a beating heart's function over time Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Podcast Extra: Rosamund Pike on portraying Marie Curie
2020-03-21 04:00:00
Radioactive is a new biopic on Marie Skłodowska Curie with Rosamund Pike taking on the role of Curie. This Podcast Extra is an extended version of reporter Lizzie Gibney's interview with Rosamund, in which they talk about stepping into the shoes of the scientific giant. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Coronapod: "Test, test, test!"
2020-03-20 11:59:33
In the first of our new podcast series, Benjamin Thompson, Noah Baker, and Amy Maxmen discuss the epidemiology needed to control the Covid-19 outbreak. In this episode: 03:57 Testing times Case numbers of Covid-19 have leapt around the world in recent days, but how many undetected cases are out there? We talk about the urgent need to deploy two of the cornerstones of effective epidemiology - testing and contact tracing - and discuss why these measures aren't being rolled out worldwide. News article: Scientists exposed to coronavirus wonder: why weren't we notified?; News article: South Korea is reporting intimate details of COVID-19 cases: has it helped?; News explainer: What China's coronavirus response can teach the rest of the world 14:23 Global governance in the wake of Covid-19 The International Health Regulations (IHR) were set up to help countries prepare for, and respond to, public-health emergencies. Rebecca Katz, a health security researcher specialising in emerging infectious diseases, tells us how the IHR are holding up during the Covid-19 outbreak. Worldview: Pandemic policy can learn from arms control Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


19 March 2020: Rosamund Pike in Radioactive, and the resurgence of Russian science
2020-03-18 09:30:09
This week, we speak to Rosamund Pike about her experience portraying Marie Skłodowska Curie, and we find out how science in Russia is changing after years of decline. In this episode: 01:43 Radioactive British actor Rosamund Pike tells us about her new film, and her experience of portraying double Nobel-Laureate Marie Curie. Arts Review: Marie Curie biopic should have trusted pioneer's passion 10:17 Research Highlights The neural circuitry involved in stopping, and a jelly-like substance that cleans paintings. Research Highlight: A neural highway to human motor control; Research article: Mastrangelo et al. 12:27 Russian science Decades after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russian science may be having a revival. News Feature: Russia aims to revive science after era of stagnation; Editorial: The price of Russia-China research collaborations Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Podcast Extra: Coronavirus - science in the pandemic
2020-03-17 09:00:23
In this Podcast Extra, we hear from epidemiologists, genomicists and social scientists about how they're working to tackle the coronavirus and what they've learned so far. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Long Read Podcast: Are feelings more than skin deep?
2020-03-13 09:27:32
Research in the 1960s and 1970s suggested that emotional expressions - smiling when happy, scowling when angry, and so on - were universal. This idea stood unchallenged for a generation. But a new cohort of psychologists and cognitive scientists are revisiting the data. Many researchers now think that the picture is a lot more complicated, and that facial expressions vary widely between contexts and cultures. This is an audio version of our feature: Why faces don't always tell the truth about feelings, written by Douglas Heaven and read by Kerri Smith. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


12 March 2020: An ancient bird trapped in amber, and life beneath the ocean floor
2020-03-11 09:05:12
This week, a newly discovered bird species from the time of the dinosaurs, and microbes hundreds of metres below the ocean floor. In this episode: 00:44 A tiny, toothy, ancient bird Researchers have found a perfectly preserved bird fossil trapped in amber, with some rather unusual features. Research Article: Xing et al.; News and Views: Tiny bird fossil might be the world's smallest dinosaur 08:09 Research Highlights Dental hygiene in the time of the Vikings, and wildebeest bones feed an African ecosystem. Research Article: Bertilsson et al; Research Article: Subalusky et al. 10:21 Deep sea life Scientists have uncovered traces of life 750m below the ocean's surface. Research article: Li et al. 17:31 News Chat Updates on the Coronavirus outbreak, and peer review in predatory journals. News: Coronavirus: latest news on spreading infection; News: Labs rush to study coronavirus in transgenic animals – some are in short supply; News: Hundreds of scientists have peer-reviewed for predatory journals For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


05 March 2020: Ultrafast machine vision, and quicker crystal creation
2020-03-04 09:01:28
This week, improving computers' image identification, and a new method for growing crystals. 00:44 Upgrading computer sight Researchers have designed a sensor that allows machines to assess images in nanoseconds. Research Article: Mennel et al.; News and Views: In-sensor computing for machine vision 06:51 Research Highlights Calorie restriction's effects on rat cells, and the dwindling of sandy seashores. Research Highlight: Old age's hallmarks are delayed in dieting rats; Research Highlight: Sandy beaches are endangered worldwide as the climate changes 08:53 Crafting crystals To understand the structure of materials, researchers often have to grow them in crystal form. A new method aims to speed up this process. Research article: Sun et al. 14:48 News Chat Coronavirus outbreak updates, and climate change's role in the Australian bush fires. News: Coronavirus: latest news on spreading infection; News: Climate change made Australia's 'unprecedented' bushfires 30% more likely For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Backchat: Covering coronavirus
2020-02-28 07:38:35
In this edition of Backchat we take a deep dive into Nature's coverage of coronavirus. As cases climb, what are some of the challenges involved in reporting on the virus? For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


27 February 2020: Mapping fruit flies' neural circuitry, and perfecting the properties of metallic glass
2020-02-26 08:00:23
This week, the brain pathways of egg laying in fruit flies, and preventing fractures in metallic glass. In this episode: 00:46 Working out the wiring behind fruit fly behaviour Researchers have identified a neural circuit linking mating and egg laying in female fruit flies. Research Article: Wang et al. 06:01 Research Highlights Ancient, cave-dwelling cockroaches, and hairy moths dampen sound. Research Highlight: Cockroaches preserved in amber are the world's oldest cave dwellers; Research Highlight: Stealth flyers: moths' fuzz is superior acoustic camouflage 07:57 Making better metallic glass Metallic glasses have many desirable properties, but these materials are prone to fracturing. Now, a new manufacturing process may have overcome this issue. Research article: Pan et al.; News and Views: Metallic glasses rejuvenated to harden under strain 13:47 News Chat Coronavirus outbreak updates, a survey shows Indian bird numbers are in decline, and the genomes of New York rats. News: Coronavirus: latest news on spreading infection; News: Hundreds of bird species in India are declining; News: Genomes reveal how New York City's rats thrive in the urban jungle For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Podcast Extra: 'There is lots of anxiety': a scientist's view from South Korea
2020-02-26 05:34:23
In recent days, the number of coronavirus cases have surged in South Korea. In this Podcast Extra Nick Howe speaks to Bartosz Gryzbowski, a researcher based in the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, which is just 60km away from epicentre of the South Korean outbreak. He explains how the outbreak has affected his research and what the atmosphere is like there at the moment. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Podcast Extra: How coronavirus is affecting research in South Korea
2020-02-26 05:34:23
In recent days, the number of coronavirus cases have surged in South Korea. In this Podcast Extra Nick Howe speaks to Bartosz Gryzbowski, a researcher based in the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, which is just 60km away from epicentre of the South Korean outbreak. He explains how the outbreak has affected his research and what the atmosphere is like there at the moment. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


20 February 2020: Improving battery charging, and harnessing energy from the air
2020-02-19 08:00:00
This week, machine learning helps batteries charge faster, and using bacterial nanowires to generate electricity from thin air. In this episode: 00:46 Better battery charging A machine learning algorithm reveals how to quickly charge batteries without damaging them. Research Article: Attia et al. 07:12 Research Highlights Deciphering mouse chit-chat, and strengthening soy glue. Research Highlight: The 'silent' language of mice is decoded at last; Research Article: Gu et al. 09:21 Harnessing humidity A new device produces electricity using water in the air. Research Article: Liu et al. 16:30 News Chat Coronavirus outbreak updates, the global push to conserve biodiversity, and radar reveals secrets in an ancient Egyptian tomb. News: Coronavirus: latest news on spreading infection; News: China takes centre stage in global biodiversity push For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


13 February 2020: The puzzling structures of muddled materials, and paving the way for the quantum internet
2020-02-12 10:01:31
This week, uncovering the structure of materials with useful properties, and quantum entanglement over long distances. In this episode: 00:45 Analysing Prussian blues Analogues of the paint pigment Prussian blue are used in a variety of chemical processes. Now, researchers have uncovered their atomic structure. Research Article: Simonov et al.; News and Views: Ordered absences observed in porous framework materials 08:17 Research Highlights Teenagers' natural sleep cycles impact on academic performance, and an extinct, giant rodent with a surprisingly tiny brain. Research Highlight: A teenager's body clock can ring in school success; Research Highlight: Giant extinct rodent was all brawn and little brain 10:49 Distant entanglement Researchers have demonstrated quantum entanglement between two points separated by 50 km of fibre optic cables. Research Article: Yu et al. 17:17 News Chat The latest on the coronavirus outbreak, and gene editing gets an upgrade. News: Coronavirus: latest news on spreading infection; News: Super-precise CRISPR tool enhanced by enzyme engineering For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


06 February 2020: Out-of-office emails and work-life-balance, and an update on the novel coronavirus outbreak
2020-02-05 10:01:40
This week, how setting an out-of-office email could help promote a kinder academic culture. In this episode: 00:47 Being truly out of office Last year, a viral tweet about emails sparked a deeper conversation about academics' work-life-balance. Could email etiquette help tip the balance? Careers Article: Out of office replies and what they can say about you 09:35 Research Highlights Finding the 'greenest' oranges, and the benefits of 'baby talk'. Research Article: Bell and Horvath; Research Highlight: Babies benefit when Mum and Dad are fluent in 'baby talk' 12:06 News Chat Updates on the novel coronavirus, assessing Iran's nuclear capabilities, and the potential impacts of Brexit on UK research. News: Coronavirus: latest news on spreading infection; News: How quickly can Iran make a nuclear bomb?; News: Brexit is happening: what does it mean for science? For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


30 January 2020: Linking Australian bushfires to climate change, and Asimov's robot ethics
2020-01-29 10:01:38
This week, establishing the role of climate change in Australian bushfires, and revisiting Isaac Asimov's ethical rules for robots. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


23 January: How stress can cause grey hair, and the attitude needed to tackle climate change
2020-01-22 10:01:42
23 January: How stress can cause grey hair, and the attitude needed to tackle climate change For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


16 January 2020: Strange objects at the centre of the galaxy, and improving measurements of online activity
2020-01-15 10:01:06
Strange objects at the centre of the galaxy, and improving measurements of online activity. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


09 January 2020: A look ahead at science in 2020
2020-01-08 10:01:44
In this episode of the podcast, Nature reporter Davide Castelvecchi joins us to talk about the big science events to look out for in 2020. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


01 January 2020: Our reporters' top picks of 2019
2020-01-01 07:00:00
In this special round-up episode of the Nature Podcast, our reporters choose their favourite podcast piece of 2019. In this episode: 00:33 A sole sensation A study of people who do and don't wear shoes looks into whether calluses make feet less sensitive. Nature Podcast: 26 June 2019; Research article: Holowka et al.; News and Views: Your sensitive sole 08:56 The make up of the far side of the Moon Initial observations from the first lander to touch down on the far side of the Moon. Nature Podcast: 15 May 2019; Research article: Li et al. 15:43 Growth Mindset How a one hour course could improve academic achievement. Nature Podcast: 07 August 2019; Research article: Yeager et al. 27:44 'Manferences' Nature investigates the prevalence of conferences where most of the speakers are male. Nature Podcast: 11 September 2019; News Feature: How to banish manels and manferences from scientific meetings 34:02 Q&A with Nobel Prize winner John Goodenough We talk to John Goodenough, who was jointly awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his role in the development of the lithium-ion battery. Podcast Extra: 09 October 2019 For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Nature PastCast, December 1920: The Quantum Theory
2019-12-27 07:00:00
In this episode, we're heading back to the early twentieth century, when physicists had become deeply entangled in the implications of the quantum theory. Was the world at its smallest scales continuous, or built of discrete units? It all began with Max Planck. His Nobel Prize was the subject of a Nature news article in 1920. In this episode, we're heading back to the early twentieth century, when physicists had become deeply entangled in the implications of the quantum theory. Was the world at its smallest scales continuous, or built of discrete units? It all began with Max Planck. His Nobel Prize was the subject of a Nature news article in 1920. This episode was first broadcast in December 2013. From the archive Nature 16 December 1920 For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Podcast Extra: From climate lawyer to climate activist
2019-12-23 07:01:20
In this Podcast Extra, Nature's Chief Opinion Editor Sara Abdulla meets with Farhana Yamin to discuss why she ditched resolutions in favour of activism. This is an extended version of an interview originally broadcast in September. In this Podcast Extra, Nature's Chief Opinion Editor Sara Abdulla meets with Farhana to discuss why she ditched resolutions in favour of activism. This is an extended version of an interview originally broadcast in September. Comment: Why I broke the law for climate change For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


Podcast Extra: Epigenetics
2019-12-20 07:01:00
As part of Nature's 150th anniversary celebrations, Nick Howe dives into the topic of epigenetics. Since its origin in 1942, the term 'epigenetics' has been repeatedly defined and redefined. There's always been hype around the field, but what actually is epigenetics and how much does it influence our genes? In this Podcast Extra, Nick Howe speaks to Edith Heard, Director General of the EMBL, and Giacomo Cavalli, from the Institute of Human Genetics, to guide us through these questions and find out about the history and future of epigenetics. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


19 December 2019: A solution to the three-body problem, and festive fun
2019-12-18 10:01:08
We've launched our 2019 listener survey. We want to know what you think of the show to help us make a great podcast. You can find the survey here. Thanks! This week, a solution to a centuries-old physics problem, and holiday shenanigans. In this episode: 00:51 Disentangling three bodies A problem that has stumped scientists since the 1600s has a probabilistic solution. Research Article: Stone and Leigh 08:50 Frosty the Snowman The first of our festive science songs, about how a certain snowman is faring under climate change. Scroll to the transcript section below for the lyrics. 11:00 Festive quiz show Our reporters battle it out to be crowned as this year's quiz champion. Can they describe some of the top news headlines without saying certain important words? We find out. 19:21 Carol of M87 Our second song is about the Event Horizon Telescope collaboration's imaging of the supermassive black hole at the centre of the M87 galaxy. Scroll to the transcript section below for the lyrics. 20:33 News Chat We hear about some of the people on Nature's 10 this year. Feature: Nature's 10: Ten people who mattered this year 30:00 Rockin' Around Supremacy For our final song, we hark back to October, when Google claimed to have achieved quantum supremacy. Scroll to the transcript section below for the lyrics. TRANSCRIPT Frosty the Snowman lyrics: Frosty the Snowman was a jolly, happy soul But the smile wore off as the globe got hot 'Cause the world used too much coal. Frosty the Snowman is a fairy tale they say He was made of snow But the kids won't know 'cause it's them who have to pay. Gonna' need some magic to Convince the world to stop 'Cause now we're running out of time And he's feeling mighty hot. Oh, Frosty the Snowman, is endangered as could be And the children say they wish he'd stay, But they don't trust you and me. He led them down the streets of town Right to the climate COP. They gathered there, and Greta stared And together hollered "STOP". Frosty the Snowman, had to hurry on his way But he said we should do all that we could For to change our dirty ways. Frosty the Snowman, knew the time to act was now So the girls and boys said make some noise And we'll get a change somehow Carol of M87 lyrics: Hark at the sound Photons abound Radio waves All seem to say Out in the dark This glowing spark We find our goal See a black hole. (M) M Eight-se'en (Eight) As it was then (tee) eons ago (se'en) See it aglow Data from these Observatries Processed to give The first image One seems to see With EHT Fire in a ring Light circling Einstein was right, Warped is the light, See the lensing Bending the ring. Now-we see-a supermassive black hole. (M - eigh-ty- se'en) How-we see-a supermassive black hole. (M - eigh-ty-se'en) (M) Space time is bent (Eight) See this event (tee) Horizon burn (ee) So much to learn (se'en) Out in the dark This glowing spark We find our goal See a black hole. Rockin' Around Supremacy lyrics: Rockin' around supremacy With the latest quantum chip Google says it won the race IBM says it's a blip. Rockin' around supremacy Would a regular PC Really take 1000 years? There's no time to wait and see! You will get a futuristic feeling when you hear Voices raised in praise of physics Deck the halls with 54 qubits. Rockin' around supremacy Is the hype just overblown? There's more to do but either way It's quantum milestone! You will get a futuristic feeling when you hear Voices raised in praise of physics Deck the halls with 54 qubits. Rockin' around supremacy Is the hype just overblown? There's more to do but either way It's quantum mi-le-stone! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy


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