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Why skin grows bigger as you stretch it from Nature Podcast

From Nature Podcast - Skin's unusual response to stretching is finally explained, and the latest in a huge effort to map DNA. In this episode: 01:06 Stretching skin For decades it's been known that stretching skin causes more skin to grow, but the reasons why have been a mystery. Now, researchers have uncovered a mechanism to explain the phenomenon. Research Article: Aragona et al.; News and Views: Stretch exercises for stem cells expand the skin 07:49 Coronapod We discuss how the coronavirus pandemic has affected scientific meetings and how the learned societies that organise them are adapting. How scientific conferences will survive the coronavirus shock; How scientific societies are weathering the pandemic's financial storm;  A year without conferences? How the coronavirus pandemic could change research 18:18 Research Highlights A genetic trait for pain-resistance, and the accessibility-aware ancient Greeks. Research Highlight: A gene helps women in labour to skip the painkillers; Research Highlight: This temple was equipped with accessibility ramps more than 2,000 years ago 20:42 ENCODE updates The ENCODE project aims to identify all the regions in the human genome involved in gene regulation. This week, data from its third iteration has been published and we examine the highlights. Research Article: Snyder; News and Views: Expanded ENCODE delivers invaluable genomic encyclopaedia 28:50 Briefing Chat We take a look at some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time we look at how smallpox may be much older than previously thought, and how the Earth's atmosphere rings like a bell. Nature News: Smallpox and other viruses plagued humans much earlier than suspected; Physics World: Earth's atmosphere rings like a giant bell, say researchers Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


Nature Podcast
The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to neuroscience, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.

Why skin grows bigger as you stretch it
2020-07-29 08:00:14
Skin's unusual response to stretching is finally explained, and the latest in a huge effort to map DNA. In this episode: 01:06 Stretching skin For decades it's been known that stretching skin causes more skin to grow, but the reasons why have been a mystery. Now, researchers have uncovered a mechanism to explain the phenomenon. Research Article: Aragona et al.; News and Views: Stretch exercises for stem cells expand the skin 07:49 Coronapod We discuss how the coronavirus pandemic has affected scientific meetings and how the learned societies that organise them are adapting. How scientific conferences will survive the coronavirus shock; How scientific societies are weathering the pandemic's financial storm;  A year without conferences? How the coronavirus pandemic could change research 18:18 Research Highlights A genetic trait for pain-resistance, and the accessibility-aware ancient Greeks. Research Highlight: A gene helps women in labour to skip the painkillers; Research Highlight: This temple was equipped with accessibility ramps more than 2,000 years ago 20:42 ENCODE updates The ENCODE project aims to identify all the regions in the human genome involved in gene regulation. This week, data from its third iteration has been published and we examine the highlights. Research Article: Snyder; News and Views: Expanded ENCODE delivers invaluable genomic encyclopaedia 28:50 Briefing Chat We take a look at some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time we look at how smallpox may be much older than previously thought, and how the Earth's atmosphere rings like a bell. Nature News: Smallpox and other viruses plagued humans much earlier than suspected; Physics World: Earth's atmosphere rings like a giant bell, say researchers Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
33 minutes, 5


The chemical that turns locusts from Jekyll into Hyde
2020-08-12 08:37:35
Triggering swarming behaviour in locusts, and new insights into how humans synchronize.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


Audio long-read: Pluto's dark side is overflowing with secrets
2020-08-07 08:26:19
This is an audio version of our feature: Pluto's dark side spills its secrets – including hints of a hidden ocean  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


Why skin grows bigger as you stretch it
2020-07-29 08:00:14
Skin's unusual response to stretching is finally explained, and the latest in a huge effort to map DNA. In this episode: 01:06 Stretching skin For decades it's been known that stretching skin causes more skin to grow, but the reasons why have been a mystery. Now, researchers have uncovered a mechanism to explain the phenomenon. Research Article: Aragona et al.; News and Views: Stretch exercises for stem cells expand the skin 07:49 Coronapod We discuss how the coronavirus pandemic has affected scientific meetings and how the learned societies that organise them are adapting. How scientific conferences will survive the coronavirus shock; How scientific societies are weathering the pandemic's financial storm;  A year without conferences? How the coronavirus pandemic could change research 18:18 Research Highlights A genetic trait for pain-resistance, and the accessibility-aware ancient Greeks. Research Highlight: A gene helps women in labour to skip the painkillers; Research Highlight: This temple was equipped with accessibility ramps more than 2,000 years ago 20:42 ENCODE updates The ENCODE project aims to identify all the regions in the human genome involved in gene regulation. This week, data from its third iteration has been published and we examine the highlights. Research Article: Snyder; News and Views: Expanded ENCODE delivers invaluable genomic encyclopaedia 28:50 Briefing Chat We take a look at some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time we look at how smallpox may be much older than previously thought, and how the Earth's atmosphere rings like a bell. Nature News: Smallpox and other viruses plagued humans much earlier than suspected; Physics World: Earth's atmosphere rings like a giant bell, say researchers Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


When did people arrive in the Americas? New evidence stokes debate
2020-07-22 08:00:23
New evidence may push back the date on human arrival to the Americas, and an examination of science's flaws. In this episode: 00:59 Ancient Americans Two papers suggest that humans were present in the Americas thousands of years before many people have thought. We examine the evidence. Research Article: Ardelean et al.; Research Article: Becerra-Valdivia and Higham; News and Views: Evidence grows that peopling of the Americas began more than 20,000 years ago 10:44 Coronapod We discuss the latest results from vaccine trials around the world, and controversy in the US as COVID-19 data collection moves out of the CDC. News: Coronavirus vaccines leap through safety trials – but which will work is anybody's guess 24:38 Research Highlights How being green makes things easy for some frogs, and how waves will be affected by climate change. Research Highlight: How frogs became green – again, and again, and again; Research Highlight: Extreme Arctic waves set to hit new heights 27:11 How can science improve? A new book highlights some of the flaws of how science is done. We caught up with the author to find out his thoughts on how science can be cleaned up. Books and Arts: Fraud, bias, negligence and hype in the lab – a rogues' gallery 35:54 Briefing Chat We take a look at some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time we discuss a puzzling new insight into the expansion of the Universe, and an update to Plan S that will allow open-access research to be published in any journal. Nature News: Mystery over Universe's expansion deepens with fresh data; Nature News: Open-access Plan S to allow publishing in any journal Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


Graphene's magic angle reveals a new twist
2020-07-15 08:00:45
Probing the superconducting properties of graphene and bacteria that can use manganese to grow. 01:15 Magic angle graphene If you sandwich two sheets of graphene together and twist one in just the right way, it can gain some superconducting properties. Now, physicists have added another material to this sandwich which stabilises that superconductivity, a result that may complicate physicists' understanding of magic angles. Research Article: Arora et al. 08:22 Coronapod With evidence mounting that SARS-CoV2 can spread in tiny aersolised droplets, researchers have called on the WHO to change their guidance for disease prevention. News: Mounting evidence suggests coronavirus is airborne – but health advice has not caught up; Research article: Morwaska et al.; WHO: Transmission of SARS-CoV-2: implications for infection prevention precautions 19:27 Research Highlights Repairing human lungs by hooking them up to pigs, and a new form of carbon. Research Highlight: How to use a live pig to revitalize a human lung; Research Highlight: This material is almost as hard as diamond – but as light as graphite 21:46 Manganese munchers For decades it's been thought that microbes that use manganese as an energy source must exist. Now, for the first time, researchers have found evidence that they do. Research Article: Yu and Leadbetter 29:12 Briefing Chat We take a look at some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time we discuss DNA evidence of contact between ancient Native Americans and Polynesians, reintroduction of bison to the UK, and the first extinction of a modern marine fish. Nature News: Ancient voyage carried Native Americans' DNA to remote Pacific islands; The Guardian: Wild bison to return to UK for first time in 6,000 years; Scientific American: Smooth Handfish Extinction Marks a Sad Milestone Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


Coronapod: Massive coronavirus outbreak strikes iconic Californian prison after it rejected expert aid
2020-07-10 13:12:35
In this episode: 01:47 Disaster in San Quentin San Quentin prison is facing a massive outbreak, we dig into how they got there. The crisis has arisen despite warnings from experts, and offers of free tests, which were declined. We ask why? And what can be done now? News: California's San Quentin prison declined free coronavirus tests and urgent advice – now it has a massive outbreak 29:51 One good thing For the last episode of Coronapod, our hosts pick out ways that the pandemic has changed them for the better, including professional flexibility, a renewed focus on the power of reporting and time with family 36:07 Lockdown and children's health Reporter Stewart asks if lockdowns could have any lasting impact on her young children - what evidence is there on the effect of isolation on young minds? Survey: Co-Space Study: Supporting Parents, Adolescents and Children during Epidemics  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


Massive coronavirus outbreak strikes iconic Californian prison after it rejected expert aid
2020-07-10 13:12:35
In this episode: 01:47 Disaster in San Quentin San Quentin prison is facing a massive outbreak, we dig into how they got there. The crisis has arisen despite warnings from experts, and offers of free tests, which were declined. We ask why? And what can be done now? News: California's San Quentin prison declined free coronavirus tests and urgent advice – now it has a massive outbreak 29:51 One good thing For the last episode of Coronapod, our hosts pick out ways that the pandemic has changed them for the better, including professional flexibility, a renewed focus on the power of reporting and time with family 36:07 Lockdown and children's health Reporter Stewart asks if lockdowns could have any lasting impact on her young children - what evidence is there on the effect of isolation on young minds? Survey: Co-Space Study: Supporting Parents, Adolescents and Children during Epidemics  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


The six-year-old space agency with hopes for Mars
2020-07-08 08:00:07
On this week's podcast, an ambitious Mars mission from a young space agency, and how crumbling up rocks could help fight climate change. In this episode: 00:46 Mars hopes In a few weeks the UAE's first mission to Mars is due to launch. We speak to the mission leads to learn about the aims of the project, and how they developed the mission in under six years. News Feature: How a small Arab nation built a Mars mission from scratch in six years; News Feature: Countdown to Mars: three daring missions take aim at the red planet 09:53 Research Highlights Pluto appears to be losing its atmosphere, and solving the mystery of a pitch-black prehistoric mine. Research Highlight: Goodbye, Pluto's atmosphere; Research Highlight: Why ancient people pushed deep into Mexico's pitch-black caverns 12:12 Climate rocks Researchers have assessed whether Enhanced Weathering - a technique to pull carbon dioxide out of the air - has the potential to help battle climate change. Research Article: Beerling et al. 18:41 Briefing Chat We take a look at some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time we talk about an outbreak of flesh-eating bacteria in Australia, and how flatworms can regrow their nervous systems. The Atlantic: Australia Has a Flesh-Eating-Bacteria Problem; The New York Times: A Worm's Hidden Map for Growing New Eyes Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


Coronapod: Lessons from pandemic 'war-game' simulations
2020-07-03 08:47:51
Next week, we'll be wrapping up Coronapod in its current form. Please fill out our short survey to let us know your thoughts on the show. In this episode: 02:15 Simulating pandemics Researchers have run numerous military-style simulations to predict the consequences of fictitious viral outbreaks. We discuss how these simulations work, what recommendations come out of them and if any of these warnings have been heeded. 24:08 One good thing Our hosts pick out things that have made them smile in the last week, including audience feedback, the official end of the Ebola outbreak in the northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, and an enormous t-shirt collection. News: World's second-deadliest Ebola outbreak ends in Democratic Republic of the Congo 28:50 The latest coronavirus research papers Benjamin Thompson takes a look through some of the key coronavirus papers of the last few weeks. News: Coronavirus research updates Cell: A SARS-CoV-2 Infection Model in Mice Demonstrates Protection by Neutralizing Antibodies Cell: Generation of a Broadly Useful Model for COVID-19 Pathogenesis, Vaccination, and Treatment Clincal Infectious Diseases: The natural history and transmission potential of asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection Nature: Suppression of a SARS-CoV-2 outbreak in the Italian municipality of Vo' medRxiv: Test sensitivity is secondary to frequency and turnaround time for COVID-19 surveillance Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


What the atomic structure of enamel tells us about tooth decay
2020-07-01 08:00:51
On this week's podcast, how the molecular structure of tooth enamel may impact decay, and a mysterious planetary core from a half-formed gas giant. In this episode: 00:46 Unravelling tooth enamel Researchers have been looking into the structure and composition of enamel in an effort to better understand tooth decay. Research Article: DeRocher et al. 07:02 Research Highlights An adhesive patch to help heal heart-attacks, and a new technique to inspect the structure of 2D 'wonder materials'. Research Highlight: A healing patch holds tight to a beating heart; Research Highlight: A snapshot shows off super-material only two atoms thick 09:21 Unusual planet In the region close to stars known as the 'hot Neptune desert' planets of Neptune's size are rarely found, but this week scientists have uncovered one and are trying to untangle its mysteries. Research Article: Armstrong et al. 14:52 Briefing Chat We take a look at some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time we talk about the pitfalls of using CRISPR in human embryos, and renaming of moon craters inadvertently named after Nazi scientists. Nature News: CRISPR gene editing in human embryos wreaks chromosomal mayhem; Prospect Magazine: Astronomers unknowingly dedicated moon craters to Nazis. Will the next historical reckoning be at cosmic level? Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


Coronapod: The state of the pandemic, six months in
2020-06-26 10:08:11
In a few weeks, we'll be wrapping up Coronapod in its current form. Please fill out our short survey to let us know your thoughts on the show. In this episode: 03:13 What have we learnt? We take a look back over the past six months of the pandemic, and discuss how far the world has come. It's been a period of turmoil and science has faced an unprecedented challenge. What lessons can be learned from the epidemic so far to continue the fight in the months to come? Financial Times: Coronavirus tracked: the latest figures as countries start to reopen Wellcome Open Research: What settings have been linked to SARS-CoV-2 transmission clusters? 12:55 Unanswered questions After months of intensive research, much is known about the new coronavirus - but many important questions remain unanswered. We look at the knowledge gaps researchers are trying to fill. Nature Medicine: Real-time tracking of self-reported symptoms to predict potential COVID-19 20:36 How has lockdown affected fieldwork? The inability to travel during lockdown has seriously hampered many researchers' ability to gather fieldwork data. We hear from three whose work has been affected, and what this means for their projects. Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


How playing poker can help you make decisions
2020-06-24 08:00:17
On this week's podcast, life lessons from poker, and keeping things civil during peer review. In this episode: 00:44 Deciding to play poker When writer Maria Konnikova wanted to better understand the human decision making process, she took a rather unusual step: becoming a professional poker player. We delve into her journey and find out how poker could help people make better decisions. Books and Arts: What the world needs now: lessons from a poker player 09:12 Research Highlights A sweaty synthetic skin that can exude useful compounds, and Mars's green atmosphere. Research Highlight: An artificial skin oozes 'sweat' through tiny pores; Research Highlight: The red planet has a green glow 11:21 Developing dialogues The peer-review process is an integral part of scientific discourse, however, sometimes interactions between authors and reviews can be less than civil. How do we tread the fine line between critique and rudeness? Editorial: Peer review should be an honest, but collegial, conversation 18:47 Briefing Chat We take a look at some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time we talk about research into racism, and a possible hint of dark matter. Nature News: What the data say about police brutality and racial bias – and which reforms might work; Nature News: Mathematicians urge colleagues to boycott police work in wake of killings; Quanta: Dark Matter Experiment Finds Unexplained Signal Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


Coronapod: Dexamethasone, the cheap steroid that could cut coronavirus deaths
2020-06-19 09:20:11
Hope rises as the first potentially life-saving treatment emerges from drug trials.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


Incest in the elite of Neolithic Ireland
2020-06-17 08:00:49
This week, researchers make diamonds tough, and evidence of incest in a 5,000 year old tomb. In this episode: 00:51 Tough versus hard Diamonds are famed for their hardness, but they are not so resistant to fracture. Now, researchers have toughened up diamonds, which could open up new industrial applications. Research Article: Yue et al. 06:07 Research Highlights A spacecraft helps physicists work out the lifespan of a neutron, and the icy hideaway of an endangered whale. Research Highlight: The vanishing-neutron mystery might be cracked by a robot in outer space; Research Highlight: A secluded icy fortress shelters rare whales 08:33 Ancient inbreeding Analysis of the genomes of humans buried in an ancient Irish tomb has uncovered many surprises, including evidence of incest amongst the elite. Research Article: Cassidy et al.; News and Views: Incest uncovered at the elite prehistoric Newgrange monument in Ireland 21:13 #ShutdownSTEM Nature reporter Nidhi Subbaraman joins us to talk about the #ShutdownSTEM movement, and anti-black racism in academia. Editorial: Note from the editors: Nature joins #ShutDownSTEM; News: Grieving and frustrated: Black scientists call out racism in the wake of police killings; News: Thousands of scientists worldwide to go on strike for Black lives; News: How #BlackInTheIvory put a spotlight on racism in academia Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


Long Read Podcast: Enigmatic neutron stars may soon give up their secrets
2020-06-15 04:00:00
An instrument on the International Space Station is providing new insights into some of the Universe's most baffling objects. Neutron stars have puzzled scientists for decades. It's known that these ultra-dense objects are born from the remnants of supernovae, yet what's under their surface, and what processes that go on within them, remain a mystery. Now, an instrument called the Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer is providing new information to help answer these questions, ushering in a new era of research into these strange stars. This is an audio version of our feature: The golden age of neutron-star physics has arrived  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


Coronapod: The Surgisphere scandal that rocked coronavirus drug research
2020-06-12 10:14:01
In this episode: 00:52 Testing disparities As testing capacities increase, it is clear that not everyone has equal access. But grassroots organisations are trying to correct this inequity. We hear about one researcher's fight to get testing to those below the poverty line in California. 09:04 The hydroxychloroquine saga continues As a high profile study in the Lancet is retracted, the first data from clinical trials is coming in and it is not encouraging. We discuss the murky future of hydroxychloroquine as a COVID drug. News: High-profile coronavirus retractions raise concerns about data oversight 12:31 Will the Surgisphere scandal erode trust in science? A questionable dataset from a mysterious company has forced high-profile retractions and thrown doubt over drug trials and public health policies. What will the fallout be and can researchers weather the storm? 23:23 Back in the lab As lockdowns ease, researchers are starting to go back to the lab. But with various restrictions in place, what does science look like in the new normal? News: Return to the lab: scientists face shiftwork, masks and distancing as coronavirus lockdowns ease Careers: Coronavirus diaries: back to the lab again  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


The quantum space lab
2020-06-11 08:00:41
This week, the spaceborne lab that allows investigation of quantum states, and the debate surrounding how mountain height is maintained. Shutdown Stem On the tenth of June, Nature joined #ShutdownStem #strike4blacklives. Podcast: #ShutDownSTEM and the Nature Podcast https://www.shutdownstem.com/ Editorial: Systemic racism: science must listen, learn and change News: Thousands of scientists worldwide to go on strike for Black lives In this episode: 01:18 Space lab Scientists have built a lab on the international space station, allowing them to remotely investigate quantum phenomena in microgravity. Research Article: Aveline et al.; News and Views: Quantum matter orbits Earth 08:37 Research Highlights Trackable 'barcode' bacteria, and physicists simulate near light speed cycling. Research Highlight: 'Barcode' microbes could help to trace goods – from lettuce to loafers; Research Highlight: What Einstein's theory means for a cyclist moving at almost light speed 10:48 Maintaining mountain height For a long time many researchers have thought that mainly erosion controls the height of mountains, but new research suggests that tectonic forces play a bigger role. Research Article: Dielforder et al.; News and Views: Mountain height might be controlled by tectonic force, rather than erosion 16:12 Pick of the Briefing We pick our highlights from the Nature Briefing, including how sleep deprivation kills, and a monumental Maya structure hidden in plain sight. Quanta Magazine: Why Sleep Deprivation Kills; National Geographic: Massive 3,000-year-old ceremonial complex discovered in 'plain sight' Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


#ShutDownSTEM and the Nature Podcast
2020-06-09 15:00:10
On the tenth of June, Nature will be joining #ShutdownStem #strike4blacklives. We will be educating ourselves and defining actions we can take to help eradicate anti-Black racism in academia and STEM . Please join us. https://www.shutdownstem.com/ Editorial: Systemic racism: science must listen, learn and change News: Thousands of scientists worldwide to go on strike for Black lives  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


Coronapod: The heavy toll on people of colour
2020-06-05 07:50:10
In this episode: 00:45 Black Lives Matter The killing of George Floyd, a black man, by police in Minnesota has sent a shockwave of anger around the globe. As unrest continues, we discuss the protests in Washington DC and ask how scientists are reacting. 04:01 The outsized toll of covid-19 on people of colour Reports from around the globe are showing that ethnic minorities are at much higher risk of infection and death from the coronavirus. But why might that be? And what can be done about it? News: How to address the coronavirus's outsized toll on people of colour World View: How environmental racism is fuelling the coronavirus pandemic 16:27 Food for thought Richard Van Noorden suggests some inspirational listening to learn and reflect in difficult times. Podcast: George the poet 18:27 Lessons from past pandemics The coronavirus pandemic is just the latest of hundreds throughout history. Nick Howe interviews author Frank M Snowden about how disease has shaped society. Books and Arts: How pandemics shape social evolution  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


Lab-made skin grows its own hair
2020-06-03 08:00:42
This week, a new method to grow hairy skin in a dish, and new research takes aim at the RNA world hypothesis. In this episode: 00:45 Hairy Skin Researchers may have developed a way to make skin that can grow hair in the lab, paving the way for treatment of a variety of skin disorders, and perhaps even baldness. Research Article: Lee et al.; News and Views: Regenerative medicine could pave the way to treating baldness 08:56 Research Highlights How mercury moved during the 'Great Dying', and the link between mobile phones and gender equality. Research Highlight: Giant eruptions belched toxic metal during the 'Great Dying'; Research Article: Rotondi et al. 11:21 Does DNA predate life? The RNA world hypothesis posits that RNA formed spontaneously leading eventually to life. Now new research suggests that RNA and DNA formed together, before life. Research Article: Xu et al.; News and Views: How DNA and RNA subunits might have formed to make the first genetic alphabet 19:25 Pick of the Briefing We pick our highlights from the Nature Briefing, including the recent SpaceX launch, and the earliest fossil of a land animal. CBC: Scientists find oldest fossil of a land animal; Nature News: SpaceX to launch astronauts – and a new era of private human spaceflight Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday. Other links Video: We test a home antibody kit for tracking Covid-19 transmission  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


Coronapod: The divisive hydroxychloroquine study that's triggering mass confusion
2020-05-29 10:58:37
00:59 Chloroquine on rocky ground President Trump's preferred coronavirus treatment is the focus of a new study suggesting it could cause more harm than good, but not everybody agrees. We discuss the fallout as trials around the world are paused and countries diverge over policy advice. News: India expands use of controversial coronavirus drug amid safety concerns News: Safety fears over hyped drug hydroxychloroquine spark global confusion 12:12 Are we rushing science? Coronavirus papers are being published extremely quickly, while normally healthy scientific debate is being blown up in the world's press. Is there a balancing act between timely research and accurate messaging? 18:49 One good thing Our hosts pick out things that have made them smile in the last week, including hedgerow brews and a trip into the past using AI. Recipe: Elderflower 'Champagne' Video: Denis Shiryaev restores historic footage with AI 22:30 The latest coronavirus research papers Noah Baker takes a look through some of the key coronavirus papers of the last few weeks. News: Coronavirus research updates medRxiv: Full genome viral sequences inform patterns of SARS-CoV-2 spread into and within Israel Harvard Library: Reductions in commuting mobility predict geographic differences in SARS-CoV-2 prevalence in New York City Science: DNA vaccine protection against SARS-CoV-2 in rhesus macaques  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


Super-efficient catalyst boosts hopes for hydrogen fuel
2020-05-27 08:00:04
This week, perfecting catalysts that split water using light, and the mystery of missing matter in the Universe. In this episode: 00:44 Water splitting After decades of research scientists have managed to achieve near perfect efficiency using a light-activated catalyst to separate hydrogen from water for fuel. Research Article: Takata et al.; News and Views: An almost perfectly efficient light-activated catalyst for producing hydrogen from water 05:37 Research Highlights The hidden water inside the earth's core, and how working memory 'works' in children. Research Highlight: Our planet's heart is watery; Research Highlight: A child's memory prowess is revealed by brain patterns 07:53 Measuring matter Estimations of baryonic matter in the Universe have conflicted with observations, but now researchers have reconciled these differences. Research Article: Macquart et al. 13:42 Pick of the Briefing We pick our highlights from the Nature Briefing, including the possibility of a black hole in our solar system, and the biting bees that force plants to bloom. Physics World: If 'Planet Nine' is a primordial black hole, could we detect it with a fleet of tiny spacecraft?; Scientific American: Bumblebees Bite Plants to Force Them to Flower (Seriously) Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


Coronapod: Hope and caution greet vaccine trial result, and Trump vs the WHO
2020-05-22 10:51:52
01:38 Trump vs the WHO President Trump has given the WHO an ultimatum in a tweet, threatening to pull out of the organisation within 30 days unless unclear demands are met. We discuss what this means for the pandemic, the USA and the future of international health cooperation 12:06 Where are we with vaccines? The first results from vaccine trials are in and they are encouraging, but scientists are still urging caution. We hear the lowdown on the types of vaccines being developed and what hope there is of rolling them out any time soon.  News: Coronavirus vaccine trials have delivered their first results – but their promise is still unclear News: The race for coronavirus vaccines: a graphical guide News: If a coronavirus vaccine arrives, can the world make enough? 25:20 One good thing Our hosts pick out things that have made them smile in the last week, including hopeful antibody research, at-home sketch comedy and printable board games. News: Potent human antibodies could inspire a vaccine Video: Whiskers R we - SNL Video:The wild affordable world of 1 Player Print'n'Play Games Video:MORE of the Very Best Solitaire Print'n'Play Games Video: Marble run league Video: BBC goals at home (Only available in the UK) 30:04 The latest coronavirus research papers Noah Baker takes a look through some of the key coronavirus papers of the last few weeks. News: Coronavirus research updates medRxiv: Saliva is more sensitive for SARS-CoV-2 detection in COVID-19 patients than nasopharangel swabs Nature: Effect of non-pharmaceutical interventions to contain COVID-19 in China Science: Changes in contact patterns shape the dynamics of the COVID-19 outbreak in China New England Journal of Medicine: Multiorgan and Renal Tropism of SARS-CoV-2 Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


A synthetic eye that 'sees' like a human
2020-05-20 08:00:08
This week, crafting an artificial eye with the benefits of a human's, and understanding how disk-galaxies formed by peering back in time. In this episode: 00:45 Biomimetic eye Researchers fabricate an artificial eye complete with a human-like retina. Research Article: Gu et al.; News and Views: Artificial eye boosted by hemispherical retina 09:27 Research Highlights Dazzling elephant seals to avoid predation, and helping blind people 'see' through brain stimulation. Research Highlight: Mighty seals humbled by prey that flickers and flashes; Research Highlight: Blind people 'read' letters traced on their brains with electricity 11:36 Early disk-galaxy There's an open question about how disk-galaxies form, but now new observations are pointing to an answer, from the very early Universe. Research Article: Neeleman et al.; News and Views: Galaxy disk observed to have formed shortly after the Big Bang 17:47 Pick of the Briefing We pick our highlights from the Nature Briefing, including a HIV 'vaccine', and incredibly hardy bacteria. Science: Long-acting injectable drug prevents HIV infections; Quanta Magazine: Inside Deep Undersea Rocks, Life Thrives Without the Sun Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


Coronapod: The misinformation pandemic, and science funding fears
2020-05-15 08:11:24
With questionable coronavirus content flooding airwaves and online channels, what's being done to limit its impact?  In this episode:   00:57 The epidemiology of misinformation As the pandemic spreads, so does a tidal wave of misinformation and conspiracy theories. We discuss how researchers' are tracking the spread of questionable content, and ways to limit its impact. News: Anti-vaccine movement could undermine efforts to end coronavirus pandemic, researchers warn Nature Video: Infodemic: Coronavirus and the fake news pandemic   17:55 One good thing Our hosts pick out things that have made them smile in the last week, including walks in new places, an update on the Isolation Choir, and a very long music playlist. Video: The Isolation Choir sing What a Wonderful World Spotify: Beastie Boys Book Complete Songs 22:30 Funding fears for researchers Scientists around the world are concerned about the impacts that the pandemic will have on their funding and research projects. We hear from two who face uncertainty, and get an update on the plans put in place by funding organisations to support their researchers. Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


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The Wubi Effect
When we think of China today, we think of a technological superpower. From Huweai and 5G to TikTok and viral social media, China is stride for stride with the United States in the world of computing. However, China's technological renaissance almost didn't happen. And for one very basic reason: The Chinese language, with its 70,000 plus characters, couldn't fit on a keyboard.  Today, we tell the story of Professor Wang Yongmin, a hard headed computer programmer who solved this puzzle and laid the foundation for the China we know today. This episode was reported and produced by Simon Adler with reporting assistance from Yang Yang. Special thanks to Martin Howard. You can view his renowned collection of typewriters at: antiquetypewriters.com Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.