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16 May 2019: Recoding genomes, and material from the Moon's far side

From Nature Podcast - This week, rewriting the script of life, and a trip to the far side of the Moon.


Nature Podcast
The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to neuroscience, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.

16 May 2019: Recoding genomes, and material from the Moon's far side
2019-05-15 10:01:32
This week, rewriting the script of life, and a trip to the far side of the Moon.
23 minutes, 4


16 May 2019: Recoding genomes, and material from the Moon's far side
2019-05-15 10:01:32
This week, rewriting the script of life, and a trip to the far side of the Moon.


09 May 2019: Urban vs Rural BMI, and the health of rivers
2019-05-08 10:01:08
This week, body mass increases around the world, and river connections in decline.


02 May 2019: China's growing science network, and talking brain signals
2019-05-01 10:34:11
This week, China's Belt and Road Initiative, and translating brain patterns into speech.


REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast April 1953
2019-04-26 08:56:52
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we're rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science. Over 60 years ago, James Watson and Francis Crick published their famous paper proposing a structure for DNA. Everyone knows that story - but fewer people know that there were actually three papers about DNA in that issue of Nature. In this podcast, first broadcast in April 2013, we uncover the evidence that brought Watson and Crick to their conclusion, discuss how the papers were received at the time, and hear from one scientist who was actually there: co-author of one of the DNA papers, the late Raymond Gosling.


25 April 2019: Tiny earthquakes, the genetics of height, and how US-China politics is affecting research
2019-04-25 03:40:33
This week we've got an extended News Chat between presenter Benjamin Thompson and Nature's European Bureau Chief Nisha Gaind. They discuss a new way to identify tiny earthquakes, new insights into the heritability of height, and how political tensions between the US and China are affecting scientists and research.


18 April 2019: Reviving brains, lightning, and spring books
2019-04-17 10:03:34
This week, restoring function in dead pig brains, spring science books, and the structure of lightning. If you have any questions about the partly-revived brains study, then the reporters at Nature are keen to answer them. You can submit them at the bottom of the article, here: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01216-4  


Podcast Extra: The first image of a black hole
2019-04-11 12:06:13
This week, researchers released the first image of a black hole at the centre of the M87 galaxy. In this special News Chat, Nature reporter Davide Castelvecchi, who was at a press conference in Brussels where the image was announced, tells Benjamin Thompson about the image and what scientists are saying about it.


11 April 2019: Heart failure and vacuum field fluctuations.
2019-04-10 10:01:04
This week, a new mouse model for heart failure and characterising energy fluctuations in empty space.


04 April 2019: MDMA and the malleable mind, and keeping skin young
2019-04-03 10:01:14
This week, why MDMA could make social interactions more rewarding, and how your skin keeps itself youthful.


Backchat March 2019: Calls for a research moratorium, and the evolution of science reporting
2019-03-29 11:44:13
In this month's roundtable, our reporters discuss calls to pause heritable genome-editing research, and how science journalism has changed in the past 20 years.


28 March 2019: Human impacts on Mount Kilimanjaro, sex differences in pain, and a crystal-based cooling method
2019-03-27 11:01:11
This week, how humans are affecting Kilimanjaro's ecosystems, differences in pain based on biological sex, and refrigerating with crystals.


21 March 2019: Antibiotics in orchards, and rethinking statistical significance
2019-03-20 11:01:07
This week, a plan to spray antibiotics onto orange trees, and is it time to retire statistical significance?


REBROADCAST: Nature Pastcast March 1918
2019-03-15 08:16:08
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we're rebroadcasting episodes from our Pastcast series, bringing to life key moments in the history of science. As the First World War draws to an end, astronomer Arthur Eddington sets out on a challenging mission: to prove Einstein's new theory of general relativity by measuring a total eclipse. The experiment became a defining example of how science should be done. This episode was first broadcast in March 2014.


14 March 2019: Ebola in DRC, a new HIV treatment, and the proposed US budget. 
2019-03-14 05:25:34
Instead of a regular edition of the Nature Podcast, this week we've got an extended News Chat between Benjamin Thompson and Amy Maxmen. They discuss the ongoing Ebola outbreak in DRC, an injectable treatment for HIV, and how the proposed US 2020 budget could affect science.


07 March 2019: Coastal carbon-sinks, mobile health, and Mileva Marić
2019-03-06 10:01:56
This week, wetlands' ability to store carbon, mobile health, and the story of Mileva Marić.


28 February 2019: Cuckoo parasitism, topological materials and cannabinoids in yeast.
2019-02-27 10:01:41
This week, the parenting strategies of a tropical cuckoo, increasing the number of topological materials, and growing cannabinoids in yeast.


28 February 2019: Cuckoo parasitism, topological materials, and cannabinoids in yeast.
2019-02-27 10:01:41
This week, the parenting strategies of a tropical cuckoo, increasing the number of topological materials, and growing cannabinoids in yeast.


21 February 2019: Mouse cell atlases and cataloguing viruses
2019-02-20 10:01:52
This week, mapping every cell in a mouse embryo and the benefits of cataloguing all the viruses on Earth.


14 February 2019: Atherosclerosis and disruptive science
2019-02-13 10:01:25
This week, the links between atherosclerosis and sleep-deprivation, and how team size affects research outputs.


07 February 2019: Massive chemical libraries, and CRISPR-CasX
2019-02-06 10:01:15
This week, virtual drug discovery, and a new addition to the CRISPR toolkit.


31 January 2019: Women of the periodic table, and harvesting energy from Wi-Fi
2019-01-30 10:01:11
This week, the female chemists who helped build the periodic table, and harnessing the extra energy in Wi-Fi signals.


24 January 2019: Economic downturns and black holes
2019-01-23 10:01:46
This week, the effects of recessions on public health, and simulating supermassive black holes.


17 January 2019: RNA splicing in yeast, and a walking fossil
2019-01-16 10:01:40
This week, investigating introns' roles, and reanimating a fossil.


Podcast Extra: The search for a rare disease treatment
2019-01-11 09:15:30
Nick Sireau's sons have a rare genetic disease called alkaptonuria, which can lead to body tissues becoming brittle, causing life long health issues. In this Podcast Extra, Geoff Marsh speaks to Nick and to the physician Dr Lakshminarayan Ranganath about their search for a treatment for alkaptonuria.


10 January 2019: Fast Radio Bursts and new year future gazing
2019-01-09 10:01:37
This week, detecting intergalactic radio bursts, and seeing what's in store for science in 2019.


Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
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