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06 December 2018: Heart xenotransplants and phage fighting

From Nature Podcast - This week, improving heart xenotransplants and soil bacteria versus phages.


Nature Podcast
The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to neuroscience, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.

06 December 2018: Heart xenotransplants and phage fighting
2018-12-05 10:01:13
This week, improving heart xenotransplants and soil bacteria versus phages.
24 minutes, 2


Podcast Extra: Evidence of a 'transmissible' Alzheimer's protein
2018-12-13 08:10:23
New research suggests that a key protein involved in the neurodegenerative disease can be transferred between brains.


13 December 2018: The art of performing science, and chiral chemistry
2018-12-12 10:00:25
This week, 'performing' experiments, and making mirrored molecules.


06 December 2018: Heart xenotransplants and phage fighting
2018-12-05 10:01:13
This week, improving heart xenotransplants and soil bacteria versus phages.


29 November 2018: Atomic clock accuracy and wind farm worries
2018-11-28 10:01:47
This week, measuring gravity's strength with clocks, and worries over wind farms' wakes.


22 November 2018: An ion-drive aeroplane, and DNA rearrangement.
2018-11-21 10:01:25
This week, a solid-state plane engine with no moving parts, and 'mosaicism' in brain cells.


15 November 2018: Barnard's Star, and clinical trials
2018-11-14 10:01:06
This week, evidence of a nearby exoplanet, and clinical trials in a social media world.


08 November 2018: Designer cells, and a Breakthrough researcher
2018-11-07 10:01:21
This week, building a cell from the bottom up, and a Breakthough Prize winner


01 November 2018: Mood forecasting technology, and where are the WIMPs?
2018-10-31 11:02:28
This week, the role that mood forecasting technology may play in suicide prevention, and a 'crisis' in dark matter research.


01 November 2018: Mood forecasting technology, and where are the WIMPS?
2018-10-31 11:02:28
This week, the role that mood forecasting technology may play in suicide prevention, and a 'crisis' in dark matter research.


18 October 2018: Cannabis horticulture and the Sun's place in history
2018-10-17 10:00:59
This week, how science can help Canadian cannabis growers and a potted history of the Sun.


11 October 2018: The life of a new Nobel laureate and organised ants
2018-10-10 10:00:00
This week, what life is like when you've just won a Nobel prize, and how a vestigial organ helps ants get organised.


04 October 2018: Latent HIV, bird personalities and the Hyabusa2 mission
2018-10-03 10:38:10
This week, targeting latent HIV, the breeding behaviour of bold birds, and an update on a near-Earth asteroid mission.


27 September 2018: A wearable biosensor and a mechanical metamaterial.
2018-09-26 10:00:00
This week, an ultra-thin, wearable biosensor and a multi-shape, mechanical metamaterial.


20 September 2018: Negative emissions and swarms under strain
2018-09-19 10:00:00
This week, the ethics of sucking carbon-dioxide out the atmosphere and bee swarms under strain.


13 September 2018: The oldest drawing and the energy of data
2018-09-12 10:00:00
This week, the oldest drawing ever found, and the hidden energy costs of data.


6 September 2018: Space junk, and a physicist's perspective on life
2018-09-05 10:00:00
This week, keeping an eye on space junk, and how a physicist changed our understanding of life.


30 August 2018: Gravity's big G and the evolution of babies
2018-08-29 10:00:00
This week, an early mammal relative's babies, and new attempts to pin down the strength of gravity.


Backchat August 2018: Audio reporting, audience feedback, and Brexit
2018-08-24 07:00:00
In this month's roundtable, audio vs print reporting, returning to Brexit, and finding out about our audience.


23 August 2018: Quantum computers and labour division in ants
2018-08-22 10:00:27
This week, colony size and labour division in ants, and simulating a quantum system on a quantum computer.


16 August 2018: Bumblebees, opioids, and ocean weather
2018-08-15 10:00:00
This week, more worries for bees, modelling the opioid crisis, and rough weather for seas.


8 August 2018: Fox aggression, microbiota and geoengineering
2018-08-08 10:00:00
This week, shaping the gut microbiota, geoengineering's effect on farming, and the genetics of fox aggression.


02 August 2018: Zebra finch colour perception, terraforming Mars, and attributing extreme weather
2018-08-01 10:00:00
This week, how a bird sees colour, potential problems with terraforming Mars, and linking extreme weather to our changing climate.


26 July 2018: Conservation, automata, and pet DNA tests
2018-07-25 10:00:00
This week, automata through the ages, problems with pet DNA tests, and a conservation conundrum.


19 July 2018: DNA scaffolds, climate-altering microbes, and a robot chemist
2018-07-18 10:00:00
This week, tougher DNA nanostructures, climate-altering permafrost microbes, and using a robot to discover chemical reactions.


12 July 2018: Rats, reefs, and career streaks
2018-07-11 10:00:00
This week, rats and coral reefs, charting successful careers streaks, and Cape Town's water crisis.


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