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Are We There Yet? | Top Science Podcasts 2020

The top science podcasts of 2020 updated daily.


Are We There Yet?
When it comes to human space exploration, we're on the brink of something big. Join host Brendan Byrne as he explores the advances in human space exploration. From conversations with the engineers and scientists building the technology one day heading to Mars, to talks with visionaries and leaders who want to take humankind to deep space, the Are We There Yet? podcast reveals the next chapters in human space exploration.

The Deep Space Economy
2020-07-07 15:36:25
Commercial space is booming — fueled by fresh cash, lots of new rockets and a change in how NASA works with private companies. What's ahead for this new chapter in private space business? We'll speak with Mary Lynne Dittmar President & CEO, Coalition for Deep Space Exploration, about the deep space economy. Then, fresh science payloads are heading to the moon soon, ahead of the return of NASA astronauts to the lunar surface. What's left to learn? We'll speak with our panel of expert scientists on this week's "I'd Like to Know" segment about the new lunar science on the horizon. Be sure to check out Mary Lynne Dittmar’s new show “The Deep Space Podcast.” Get it wherever you get this podcast or visit the Coalition for Deep Space Exploration’s website.
27 minutes, 52 seconds


Space Tourism Promises Fresh Perspective Of Planet Earth
2020-06-30 15:31:08
As early as next year, space tourism company Space Perspective will ferry humans to the edge of space using a giant hydrogen-filled balloon. The capsule will have all the comforts of home - like a bar and a bathroom - and promises breathtaking views of the curvature of the Earth and blackness of space. As more and more space tourism ventures come online, how will greater access to space change how humans perceive this planet? We'll talk with Space Perspectives CEOs Jane Poynter & Taber MacCallum about the dawn of space tourism. Then, why do some planets have rings? We'll talk with our panel of expert scientists on this week's "I'd Like to Know" segment.
27 minutes, 52 seconds


Race In Space
2020-06-23 15:51:48
Protests across the country have highlighted systemic racism and turned the national conversation towards equality and justice. So how does racial inequality affect space exploration? We'll speak with Jarard Williams, a recent graduate of the University of Mississippi School of Law about equality in space and the effort to inspire more diverse explorers. Williams recently gave a lecture called "The Dark Star: Black Representation in Space" on racial inequality in the space industry. Then, Saturn’s moon Titan is getting farther and farther away from the ringed planet. How do we know this — and is Titan the only moon on the move? We'll ask our panel of experts on this week's segment "I'd Like to Know".
28 minutes, 14 seconds


How NASA's Reliance On Commercial Companies Is Shaping Space Exploration
2020-06-16 15:35:43
NASA is relying more and more on the private sector to help its exploration efforts — from building the next moon lander to transporting astronauts to the International Space Station. So what does the future look like for this new dawn of commercial exploration? We'll talk with Main Engine Cutoff podcast host Anthony Colangelo about the latest space business news and how leveraging commercial companies will help NASA reach places like the moon and Mars. Then, magnetars are neutron stars with powerful magnetic fields with the power to destroy anything in their paths. So where did they come from? We'll chat with our panel of expert scientists on this week's "I'd Like to Know" segment.
28 minutes, 14 seconds


James Webb Space Telescope: Finishing The Next Big Observatory
2020-06-09 15:46:35
The James Webb Space Telescope is nearing the finish line, with a campaign of full systems tests on the horizon. The mega space-based telescope is an incredible machine — with a sunshield that once deployed in space will be the size of a tennis court. Once it's operational, the telescope will give scientists an unprecedented view of the infrared universe. But getting there has been a challenge — with the telescope's complexity adding to delays in developing and building it and the coronavirus pandemic further slowing down the project. We'll chat with Gregory Robinson, he's the program manager for the James Webb Space Telescope, about what's ahead for the observatory and how NASA plans to get it into space. Then, what's at the edge of our solar system? We'll speak with our panel of experts on this week's "I'd Like to Know" segment — exploring the Kuiper belt.
27 minutes, 55 seconds


Inspiration & Innovation: What We Can Learn From SpaceX's Crew Dragon Launch
2020-06-02 15:26:23
On Saturday, SpaceX successfully launched two NASA astronauts from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on a mission to the International Space Station. It's the first time humans have launched from the U.S. since the end of the space shuttle program in 2011. At a time when protests were breaking out across the county, for a brief moment, millions of people watched the launch and looked to the sky marveling at what humans are capable of doing. We're going to talk about the long-lasting impact of this launch — from the inspiration it delivered to the innovation it paves the way for. We'll start with Jackie Wattles. She covers commercial space and innovation for CNN and was at the launch Saturday. She joins us to talk about how this moment paves the way for future innovation — like missions to the moon and Mars — and how it inspires others to take giant leaps once more. Then, Kyle Jeter teaches astronomy at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. He made the three hour trip  twice to watch the launch with his son and plans to use this moment of inspiration in his classroom. We'll talk with Mr. Jeter about how SpaceX's launch will inspire the next generation of human explorers.
27 minutes, 52 seconds


It's Finally Here: NASA & SpaceX Set To Launch Humans From U.S. For The First Time Since Space Shuttle
2020-05-26 15:37:24
It's finally here. The launch of American astronauts from American soil is happening this week with the launch of NASA's Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley on a SpaceX rocket. The launch of the Crew Dragon capsule with astronauts on board has been nearly a decade in the making. We'll speak with The Atlantic's staff reporter Marina Koren about the mission, how we got here and the challenges along the way. Then, we'll speak with former astronaut and SpaceX Direct Garret Reisman about the private company's push to fly astronauts and the paradigm shift of commercial space vehicles.
27 minutes, 57 seconds


Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana Ready For First Human Spaceflight Since Shuttle
2020-05-19 15:31:48
In a little over a week, SpaceX will attempt to launch two NASA astronauts to the International Space Station from Florida — the first human launch from the United States in nearly a decade. Since the start of NASA's Commercial Crew Program, the Kennedy Space Center has worked to support the next chapter of human launches. We'll speak with center director Bob Cabana about the transition to support Commercial Crew partners SpaceX and Boeing and what's in store for astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley as they make their final preparations for flight from Florida. Then, a giant radio dish in Puerto Rico observing our universe. The Arecibo observatory is a radio telescope unlocking all sorts of secrets in the cosmos. On this week's "I'd Like to Know" segment, our expert physicists explain what radio astronomy is and how Aricebo is helping scientists see deeper into our universe.
27 minutes, 52 seconds


Covering Space: Corespondent Peter King Ready To Report Human Launches Once More
2020-05-12 15:40:44
For the past 25 years, CBS radio correspondent Peter King has covered human launches from Florida — including the last Space Shuttle launch in 2011. Later this month, SpaceX will launch two NASA astronauts atop a Falcon 9 rocket. It will be the first human launch in nearly a decade. We'll talk with Peter about his experience covering astronaut launches from Kennedy Space Center. Then, the James Webb Space Telescope is behind schedule and over budget. A listener asks just how much longer can other space-based telescopes like Hubble last as we wait for the next generation to come online? We'll put that question to our panel of experts on this weeks "I'd Like to Know" segment."
27 minutes, 52 seconds


Covering Space: Correspondent Peter King Ready To Report Human Launches Once More
2020-05-12 15:40:44
For the past 25 years, CBS radio correspondent Peter King has covered human launches from Florida — including the last Space Shuttle launch in 2011. Later this month, SpaceX will launch two NASA astronauts atop a Falcon 9 rocket. It will be the first human launch in nearly a decade. We'll talk with Peter about his experience covering astronaut launches from Kennedy Space Center. Then, the James Webb Space Telescope is behind schedule and over budget. A listener asks just how much longer can other space-based telescopes like Hubble last as we wait for the next generation to come online? We'll put that question to our panel of experts on this weeks "I'd Like to Know" segment."
27 minutes, 52 seconds




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