Nav: Home

Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana Ready For First Human Spaceflight Since Shuttle from Are We There Yet?

From Are We There Yet? - In a little over a week, SpaceX will attempt to launch two NASA astronauts to the International Space Station from Florida — the first human launch from the United States in nearly a decade. Since the start of NASA's Commercial Crew Program, the Kennedy Space Center has worked to support the next chapter of human launches. We'll speak with center director Bob Cabana about the transition to support Commercial Crew partners SpaceX and Boeing and what's in store for astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley as they make their final preparations for flight from Florida. Then, a giant radio dish in Puerto Rico observing our universe. The Arecibo observatory is a radio telescope unlocking all sorts of secrets in the cosmos. On this week's "I'd Like to Know" segment, our expert physicists explain what radio astronomy is and how Aricebo is helping scientists see deeper into our universe.


Are We There Yet?
When it comes to human space exploration, we're on the brink of something big. Join host Brendan Byrne as he explores the advances in human space exploration. From conversations with the engineers and scientists building the technology one day heading to Mars, to talks with visionaries and leaders who want to take humankind to deep space, the Are We There Yet? podcast reveals the next chapters in human space exploration.

Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana Ready For First Human Spaceflight Since Shuttle
2020-05-19 15:31:48
In a little over a week, SpaceX will attempt to launch two NASA astronauts to the International Space Station from Florida — the first human launch from the United States in nearly a decade. Since the start of NASA's Commercial Crew Program, the Kennedy Space Center has worked to support the next chapter of human launches. We'll speak with center director Bob Cabana about the transition to support Commercial Crew partners SpaceX and Boeing and what's in store for astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley as they make their final preparations for flight from Florida. Then, a giant radio dish in Puerto Rico observing our universe. The Arecibo observatory is a radio telescope unlocking all sorts of secrets in the cosmos. On this week's "I'd Like to Know" segment, our expert physicists explain what radio astronomy is and how Aricebo is helping scientists see deeper into our universe.
27 minutes, 52 seconds


Inspiration & Innovation: What We Can Learn From SpaceX's Crew Dragon Launch
2020-06-02 15:26:23
On Saturday, SpaceX successfully launched two NASA astronauts from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on a mission to the International Space Station. It's the first time humans have launched from the U.S. since the end of the space shuttle program in 2011. At a time when protests were breaking out across the county, for a brief moment, millions of people watched the launch and looked to the sky marveling at what humans are capable of doing. We're going to talk about the long-lasting impact of this launch — from the inspiration it delivered to the innovation it paves the way for. We'll start with Jackie Wattles. She covers commercial space and innovation for CNN and was at the launch Saturday. She joins us to talk about how this moment paves the way for future innovation — like missions to the moon and Mars — and how it inspires others to take giant leaps once more. Then, Kyle Jeter teaches astronomy at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. He made the three hour trip  twice to watch the launch with his son and plans to use this moment of inspiration in his classroom. We'll talk with Mr. Jeter about how SpaceX's launch will inspire the next generation of human explorers.


It's Finally Here: NASA & SpaceX Set To Launch Humans From U.S. For The First Time Since Space Shuttle
2020-05-26 15:37:24
It's finally here. The launch of American astronauts from American soil is happening this week with the launch of NASA's Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley on a SpaceX rocket. The launch of the Crew Dragon capsule with astronauts on board has been nearly a decade in the making. We'll speak with The Atlantic's staff reporter Marina Koren about the mission, how we got here and the challenges along the way. Then, we'll speak with former astronaut and SpaceX Direct Garret Reisman about the private company's push to fly astronauts and the paradigm shift of commercial space vehicles.


Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana Ready For First Human Spaceflight Since Shuttle
2020-05-19 15:31:48
In a little over a week, SpaceX will attempt to launch two NASA astronauts to the International Space Station from Florida — the first human launch from the United States in nearly a decade. Since the start of NASA's Commercial Crew Program, the Kennedy Space Center has worked to support the next chapter of human launches. We'll speak with center director Bob Cabana about the transition to support Commercial Crew partners SpaceX and Boeing and what's in store for astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley as they make their final preparations for flight from Florida. Then, a giant radio dish in Puerto Rico observing our universe. The Arecibo observatory is a radio telescope unlocking all sorts of secrets in the cosmos. On this week's "I'd Like to Know" segment, our expert physicists explain what radio astronomy is and how Aricebo is helping scientists see deeper into our universe.


Covering Space: Corespondent Peter King Ready To Report Human Launches Once More
2020-05-12 15:40:44
For the past 25 years, CBS radio correspondent Peter King has covered human launches from Florida — including the last Space Shuttle launch in 2011. Later this month, SpaceX will launch two NASA astronauts atop a Falcon 9 rocket. It will be the first human launch in nearly a decade. We'll talk with Peter about his experience covering astronaut launches from Kennedy Space Center. Then, the James Webb Space Telescope is behind schedule and over budget. A listener asks just how much longer can other space-based telescopes like Hubble last as we wait for the next generation to come online? We'll put that question to our panel of experts on this weeks "I'd Like to Know" segment."


Covering Space: Correspondent Peter King Ready To Report Human Launches Once More
2020-05-12 15:40:44
For the past 25 years, CBS radio correspondent Peter King has covered human launches from Florida — including the last Space Shuttle launch in 2011. Later this month, SpaceX will launch two NASA astronauts atop a Falcon 9 rocket. It will be the first human launch in nearly a decade. We'll talk with Peter about his experience covering astronaut launches from Kennedy Space Center. Then, the James Webb Space Telescope is behind schedule and over budget. A listener asks just how much longer can other space-based telescopes like Hubble last as we wait for the next generation to come online? We'll put that question to our panel of experts on this weeks "I'd Like to Know" segment."


The Next Mission To Mars: NASA Rover Will Search For Signs Of Ancient Life
2020-05-05 15:54:41
This summer, NASA will launch a 2,000 pound robot to the surface of Mars. The Perseverance rover will search for ancient signs of life and prep samples of Martian rocks to send back home. For an overview of the mission, we'll speak with Jake Robins. He's the host of the podcast WeMartians and has been following the development of the rover as it readies for its launch from Kennedy Space Center. Then, an asteroid zipped dramatically close to Earth last week. While it wasn't a threat to our planet, it has me wondering how do we detect and protect from future threats? We'll pose that question to our panel of experts on this week's "I'd Like to Know" segment.


The Fight For Women Astronauts
2020-04-28 15:50:32
The Mercury 7 might have had the right stuff and made the headlines, but behind the scenes 13 women were being tested to become astronauts. This hidden history of the fight for women astronauts is uncovered in Rebecca Siegel's new book "To Fly Among the Stars." We'll speak with Siegel about the program and the lasting impressions these women left on the trajectory of gender equality in space flight. Then, as astronomers discover more and more planets outside our solar system, how do we know what they're made of? Our panel of expert scientists answer a listener question about uncovering the stuff that makes a planet and what's hidden on its surface — that's on this week's "I'd Like to Know" segment.


Remote Rovin': NASA Mars Rover Drivers Are Working From Home. Here's How They Do It.
2020-04-21 15:51:32
For those of us now working from home, we know there are a few challenges. Your mic doesn't work on a Zoom meeting, your cat walks across your keyboard, your VPN is busted. Well, imagine your job entails driving a car-sized rover some 100 million miles away on the surface of Mars — all from home. That's exactly what the Curiosity Rover team is doing now with great success. NASA’s Alicia Allbaugh leads the Mars rover driving team and joins us to talk about the challenges of remote working and the successes her team has accomplished. Then, each year scientists get together and plan for the next ten years of discovery. The Planetary Science and Astrobiology Decadal Survey is underway — so what's on the horizon? On this week’s installment of "I'd Like to Know," our expert scientists weigh in on what's to come in the efforts of planetary discovery.


Teaching The Next Generation Of Stargazers And Space Explorers
2020-04-14 15:50:29
Some seniors at Marjory Stoneman Douglas in Parkland, Florida are learning about the night sky and the universe they live in thanks to their astronomy teacher Kyle Jeter. Astronomy isn't a common course selection for most — we'll explore how it can help students understand all sorts of science and promote science literacy in a social media world. Then, our expert scientists have some sci-fi picks for keeping us busy during the quarantine. We'll chat with UCF's Addie Dove, Josh Colwell and Jim Cooney about science fiction shows and new science documentaries to keep us company as we're safer at home.


Teaching The Next Generation Of Star Gazers And Space Explorers
2020-04-14 15:50:29
Some seniors at Marjory Stoneman Douglas in Parkland, Florida are learning about the night sky and the universe they live in thanks to their astronomy teacher Kyle Jeter. Astronomy isn't a common course selection for most — we'll explore how it can help students understand all sorts of science and promote science literacy in a social media world. Then, our expert scientists have some sci-fi picks for keeping us busy during the quarantine. We'll chat with UCF's Addie Dove, Josh Colwell and Jim Cooney about science fiction shows and new science documentaries to keep us company as we're safer at home.


Astronaut Mike Massimino's "Unlikely" Journey To Space
2020-04-07 16:57:16
While many of us are struggling with the new normal of quarantining and self-isolating, for NASA astronauts – it's a part of the job. We'll catch up with retired NASA astronaut Mike Massimino about the importance of quarantining for space travelers, and the lessons he learned while isolated from his family during his two missions to service the Hubble Space Telescope. We'll also talk about his book, "Spaceman: An Astronaut’s Unlikely Journey to Unlock the Secrets of the Universe" which has now been adapted to a young adult novel, about how he became an astronaut in the first place. Then, with so many of us staying at home — what can we do to pass the time? Our panel of expert physicists say now's a great time to do some stargazing. A crash course in backyard astronomy from our expert scientists.


The Rise Of The Space Age Millennials
2020-03-24 15:37:20
There's a new generation leading the charge when it comes to space exploration — millennials. These 20 and 30 year olds are entering the workforce and academia, driving innovation and pushing humanity farther into the solar system. So what's motivating these millennials? And what's different from the group of folks that came before them? We'll chat with space policy analyst and author Laura Forczyk about her new book "Rise of the Space Age Millennials." Then, can planets exist outside the orbit of a star? We'll talk with our panel of experts about the fascinating observations of rogue planets — how did they escape the gravity of their host star and how do we spot them?


A New Dawn For Sun Science
2020-03-18 06:19:28
There are now two new spacecraft zooming around the sun exploring our closest star. NASA's Parker Solar Probe is getting an up close and personal look at the sun and its corona — the wispy bits that radiate off the surface. And the recently launched Solar Orbiter will explore the poles of the sun. All eyes are on the sun. So is this a new chapter of sun science? Our guest this week Nicky Fox says it is. She's Director of the NASA Heliophysics Science Division and lead scientist on the Parker Solar Probe mission. We'll talk about the early findings of the mission and how all this sun science will help better life here on Earth. Then, the matter of antimatter. Our panel of expert scientists breakdown this fundamental piece of physics.


Discovering A New Star: Jocelyn Bell Burnell's Advice For Astronomers And Women In Science
2020-03-10 15:49:31
Back in 1967, Dr. Jocelyn Bell Burnell observed a curious set of radio pulses from a new type of telescope. Her findings would lead to a new type of star — a pulsar — and begin a new chapter of astronomical discovery. The findings were groundbreaking and paved the way for a new type of observation — radio astronomy. We'll chat with Burnell about the story of that discovery, where she sees the future of radio astronomy heading and her work to get more women and minorities involved in STEM. Then, Space is huge, but that doesn't mean you don't have to keep it clean. As we continue to venture into our solar system with robotic explorers and human missions, there's a greater need for good hygiene. On this week's "I'd Like to Know" segment, we'll chat with physicists  from the University of Central Florida about keeping our dirty Earth-germs off other planets and moons — and why the search for life depends on it.


The Race To Deep Space
2020-03-03 15:51:20
The race to deep space is on. NASA has its eyes set on the moon then Mars, and other private companies like SpaceX and Blue Origin have ambitious plans to send humans into deep space. So just how close are we to breaking the bonds of Earth's gravity once more and exploring other worlds? We'll speak with Mary Lynn Dittmar, President and CEO of the Coalition for Deep Space Exploration.  Then – astronomers are picking up a strange signal from somewhere in space. Fast Radio Bursts are puzzling scientists — where are they coming from and what's causing them? On this week's "I'd Like to Know" segment, we'll ask our panel of experts about these interesting new waves. 


Space: Marketing's Final Frontier
2020-02-25 15:35:17
Space is open for business. NASA is loosening restrictions on the use of the space station for commercial companies, paving the way for new business opportunities in orbit. From music videos to commercials, companies are now looking to the cosmos to tell their stories. So what will the future of space marketing look like? And what does NASA stand to gain? We'll talk with Space Marketing Group's Trisha Navidzadeh about the bold new future of space marketing. Then, a listener asks: How far away are we from having rotating ships that create artificial gravity? We'll put that question to our expert panel of scientists on this week's edition of "I'd Like to Know".


BONUS INTERVIEW: The History Of Civilian Space
2020-02-18 16:02:55
This week we're talking with Alan Ladwig about his new book "See You in Orbit." It chronicles the efforts to get regular humans, not just astronauts, into space. You probably heard us talk about those efforts after the Challenger disaster and into the era of commercial space tourism — but the story of civilians in space starts long before that. In this bonus interview for Are We There Yet?, Ladwig takes us back to the start...


The Future Of Ordinary People In Space
2020-02-18 15:32:45
Companies like Blue Origin and Virgin Galactic are on the brink of launching a new class of astronauts into space — ordinary people. The experiences promise to give space tourists a new perspective on the world and experience the feeling of weightlessness. How will space tourism change the way we think about space and our planet? We'll chat with Alan Ladwig — former NASA official and author of the new book "See You in Orbit" about the history of civilians in space and the prospect of ordinary citizens leaving this planet. Then, NASA has its sights set on the moon — the south pole of the moon, specifically — because of the evidence of water. But just how much water is there at the poles of the moon? And how do we know? We'll ask our panel of expert scientists this week.


Solar Orbiter Mission Heads To The Sun To Study Poles Of Our Closest Star
2020-02-11 15:22:50
A new mission to study the sun launched this week from Cape Canaveral. For the first time, scientists will get a look at the poles of the sun, thanks to the Solar Orbiter spacecraft. The mission is a joint venture between the European Space Agency and NASA and will join other spacecraft studying the sun like the Parker Solar Probe. So how will Solar Orbiter help better our understanding of the sun and its effects here on Earth? We'll speak with NASA scientist Alex Young about the new era of heliophysics. Then, a listener wants to know a little more about Tabby's Star — it's a star located in the constellation Cygnus. A space telescope captured some funky behavior of the star — so what's up? We'll ask our panel of expert scientists this week on our segment "I'd Like to Know".


Will Congress Steer NASA Away From The Moon?
2020-02-04 15:42:46
The House is moving through a new authorization bill. While these pieces of legislation are usually unremarkable, this one is getting a lot of attention. That's because this bill would significantly alter NASA's current plans to head to the moon in 2024 and establish a permanent presence there, instead focusing on a human mission to Mars in the 2030s. To unpack the politics of the plan, we'll speak with Casey Dreier, Chief Advocate & Senior Space Policy Adviser at the Planetary Society. READ: Casey Dreier’s Policy Analysis on Planetary.org Then, a listener asks "Where's the love for Neptune and Uranus?" There have been no science missions to the ice giants since the Voyager flybys of the 1980s? What gives? We'll ask our panel of experts on this week's segment "I'd Like to Know" about the prospects of a ice giant mission and the likelihood it will happen this decade.


Asteroid Return Mission Spacecraft OSRIRIS-REx Picks A Sample Site
2020-01-21 15:22:39
A spacecraft more than 160 million miles away is about to suck up some asteroid dust — then send it back to Earth. The OSIRIS-REx mission will collect the sample from Bennu this summer and mission managers are carefully planning the maneuver. Scientists hope to uncover the building blocks of early life in the universe when the sample arrives back here on Earth in 2023. We'll talk with mission scientist Humberto Campins about the final site selected by the team and the surprises OSIRIS-REx uncovered along the way. Then, the star Betelgeuse is causing quite a stir after astronomers observed the star brightening and dimming in the night sky. Is it going to blow up? We'll talk with our panel of experts on this week's segment "I'd Like to Know."


Can Your Gut Leak In Space? Probably. Here's What That Means For Astronatus
2020-01-14 15:17:33
Space travel could cause a leaky gut. A new medical study found that microgravity reduces an important barrier in the stomach which could mean nasty germs could get inside Astronaut's bodies on deep-space missions. We'll chat with UC Riverside medical researcher Dr. Declan McCole about the gut biomes of astronauts and how his research can all help our guts down here on Earth. Then, how do you count the planets?  The answer to how many planets there are isn't a simple one. On this week's "I'd Like to Know" segment, we'll talk to our panel of planetary experts about the task of counting the planets and the controversies surrounding their definitions.


Booze In Space? The Storied History And Bright Future Of Alcohol In The Final Frontier
2020-01-07 15:41:49
Alcohol has long been a staple of our cultures and civilizations but is there a place for it in space? Author Chris Carberry explores this history and future of booze in space in his new book Alcohol in Space: Past, Present and Future. We'll talk about how booze made its mark on the space program and just what type of drinks we might be toasting while orbiting the Earth or exploring Mars. Then, there's a black hole at the center of our galaxy. Should we be worried about falling in? This week on our segment "I'd Like to Know", we'll chat with planetary scientists about the possibility of being gobbled up by this black hole.


A Decade of Commercial Space Innovation
2019-12-31 15:43:30
Over the last decade, there's been a change in how things get to space. Since the end of the Space Shuttle program in 2011, NASA has been looking to commercial companies to fill the void. We'll take a look at the "paradigm shift in the business of space" with The Verge's senior science reporter Loren Grush. Her recent piece for the online publication examines the commercial boom in the 2010s led largely by Elon Musk's company SpaceX. We'll talk about that growth and what's ahead for private space in the 2020s. Then, are we alone in the universe? Surely we're not and statistics can prove it. But why haven't we uncovered any evidence of life outside our planet? A conversation about the Fermi paradox with our panel of planetary science experts on this week's segment "I'd Like to Know".


Interstellar Comet Visits Our Solar System, Awes Astronomers
2019-12-17 15:34:04
Astronomers have their eyes on a rare comet zooming 100,000 miles per hour through our solar system. It's rare because it's coming from outside our solar system. The comet named 2I/Borisov is the first confirmed interstellar comet. The Hubble space telescope captured stunning images of the comet. Scientists are pouring through the data to figure out what it's made of and where it came from. That information can help us better understand our universe. We'll talk with planetary astronomer Heidi Hammel about what we know — and don't yet know — about this incredible discovery. Then, there's a lot of talk about life on Mars, but how do we actually find it? This week on "I'd Like to Know," we'll chat with our panel of planetary scientists about the likelihood of finding signs of life on the red planet and where else in the solar system we should be looking.


Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Clint Smith
The killing of George Floyd by a police officer has sparked massive protests nationwide. This hour, writer and scholar Clint Smith reflects on this moment, through conversation, letters, and poetry.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Nina
Producer Tracie Hunte stumbled into a duet between Nina Simone and the sounds of protest outside her apartment. Then she discovered a performance by Nina on April 7, 1968 - three days after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Tracie talks about what Nina's music, born during another time when our country was facing questions that seemed to have no answer, meant then and why it still resonates today.  Listen to Nina's brother, Samuel Waymon, talk about that April 7th concert here.