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Quirks and Quarks Complete Show from CBC Radio | Best Science Podcasts (2019)

Our selection of the best science podcasts of 2019. New science podcasts are updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.


Quirks and Quarks Complete Show from CBC Radio
CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks covers the quirks of the expanding universe to the quarks within a single atom... and everything in between.

Ground zero for dinosaur extinction, space archeology, toes on the brain, Finding a lost jet engine on Greenland, mystery of the wandering whales and barren tablelands
2019-09-13 09:00:00
Rocks recovered from ground zero reveal how the dinosaurs died; Archaeology from space - discovering history from a few hundred kilometres up; A jumbo jet lost an engine over Greenland — these researchers found it; The toes of foot painters are mapped in the brain as if they were fingers; Why are right whales roaming into danger off the East coast?; Why are the Tablelands of Gros Morne National Park barren?
54 minutes, 11 seconds


Quirks & Quarks 'science in the field' special — the summer adventures of scientists working in exotic and remote locations
2019-09-06 09:00:00
Dodging venomous vipers and plant poachers to study how climate change impacts insects; Searching for dinosaurs in BC's rockies — and finding grizzly bears instead; When the desert doesn't bloom fake flowers are a scientist's solution; A moment of distraction leads to near disaster while studying insects in a tropical paradise; Projectile vomiting birds are among the challenges in studying arctic lakes.
54 minutes, 11 seconds


Quirks & Quarks is on hiatus. There will no more podcasts until September
2019-07-26 09:00:00
Check back for our new season September on 7. Enjoy your summer
51 seconds


50 years ago we walked on the moon, and it transformed life on Earth
2019-07-19 09:00:00
Quirks & Quarks is celebrating the 50th anniversary of Armstrong and Aldrin putting the first human boot prints on the Moon. We've collected reminiscences and reflections from Canadian astronauts and from scientists across a diverse range of fields. They explain how the historic Apollo 11 landing inspired them and shaped the future that they're continuing to create.
54 minutes, 45 seconds


Quirks & Quarks is on hiatus. There will be no podcasts until our July 20th Apollo 11 anniversary special
2019-06-28 09:00:00
We're taking a little summer break, but check back for a new program celebrating the 50th anniversary of the moon landing on July 20.
59 seconds


Is your Wi-Fi watching you? Dog's manipulative eyebrows, Darwin's finches in danger, An AI learns numbers, genetics of smell, bonobo wing-mums, sponge scientists and electric car questions
2019-06-21 09:00:00
Your Wi-Fi router could be used to watch you breathe and monitor your heartbeat; We've bred dogs to have expressive eyebrows that manipulate our emotions; A face-eating parasite is devastating Darwin's famous Galapagos finches; AI is now learning to do things it hasn't been taught; Do your genes smell bad? DNA shows what our noses know; Bonobo mothers act as wing-mums for their sons; A research assistant named Spongebob? Sea sponges collect data for science; Do electric car batteries take more CO2 to make than they save?
1 hour, 9 minutes, 49 seconds


Should we have humans in space? A Quirks & Quarks public debate
2019-06-14 09:00:00
In our first ever Quirks & Quarks public debate, recorded live in Toronto, astronaut Chris Hadfield, cosmologist Renée Hložek, planetary scientist Marianne Mader and space flight historian Amy Shira Teitel weigh in on whether we should leave space to the robots. An extended podcast edition includes Q&A segments not in the radio broadcast.
1 hour, 6 minutes, 3 seconds


A diet of microplastic, Canada's northern limits, elephants smell numbers, depression genetics, magnetic therapy for concussion and aurorae on other planets.
2019-06-07 09:00:00
We're consuming a lot of plastic and have no idea of the risks; Canada is using science to lay claim to the North Pole; The elephant's mathematical trunk can smell numbers; Depressing conclusion as new research reverses 25 years of research; Concussion symptoms reversed in mice using magnetic therapy; Do auroras occur on other planets and moons?
54 minutes, 28 seconds


The benefits of video games, composting corpses, brewing ancient beer, right whales in the wrong place and supernovas and bipedalism
2019-05-31 09:00:00
Video games aren't corrupting young minds - they may be building them; Don't bury or cremate - soon you may compost your corpse; Drink like an Egyptian - 5000 year old yeast is resurrected to brew ancient beer; Right whales were in the wrong place because of the wrong climate; Did our ancestors evolve to walk upright because of supernovae?
54 minutes, 29 seconds


Sharks on a bird diet, fossils of fungus, 'lifelike' machines, giant beaver extinction, the beauty of calculus and oil spill dispersants
2019-05-24 09:00:00
Flying food for fish? Tiger sharks are somehow eating songbirds; Fungus fossils shows the complexity of Earth's life a billion-years-ago; Scientists create robot-like biomaterial with key traits of life; Ancient beavers as big as bears died out because of their woodless diet; No, really, calculus can be beautiful and this mathematician will tell us why; What happens to oil spills after dispersant is used?
54 minutes, 47 seconds




Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
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