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Psychology of solitary confinement, mind over genes, genocide and climate change, searching for Shackleton's ship, a waterproof sweat sensor and how birds hunt blind.

From Quirks and Quarks Complete Show from CBC Radio - Months locked in a tiny box - how solitary confinement can erode mental health; When is your brain stronger than your genes? How the mind can fool the body; 50 million deaths in the New World drove cooling in the the Little Ice Age; Searching for Endurance: Antarctic researchers hunt for the relics of Antarctic adventurers; A stick-on sensor sucks in sweat and can reveal dehydration and more; How do birds find their prey when hunting in muddy water?


Quirks and Quarks Complete Show from CBC Radio
CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks covers the quirks of the expanding universe to the quarks within a single atom... and everything in between.

Psychology of solitary confinement, mind over genes, genocide and climate change, searching for Shackleton's ship, a waterproof sweat sensor and how birds hunt blind.
2019-02-08 09:00:00
Months locked in a tiny box - how solitary confinement can erode mental health; When is your brain stronger than your genes? How the mind can fool the body; 50 million deaths in the New World drove cooling in the the Little Ice Age; Searching for Endurance: Antarctic researchers hunt for the relics of Antarctic adventurers; A stick-on sensor sucks in sweat and can reveal dehydration and more; How do birds find their prey when hunting in muddy water?
54 minutes, 37 seconds


Human brain genes in monkeys, urine archaeology, evolving human faces, Sharks and heavy metals, life on exoplanets and how insects time their mating
2019-04-18 09:00:00
Scientists have put a human brain gene into monkeys. Have they crossed the line?; Pee-oneering archeology. A new technique uses urine to study the ancient past; Why the long face? Human faces evolved to reveal emotions and communicate; Sharks cope with levels of heavy metals in their blood that would kill other animals; Is there life 'out there?' How we'll search for traces of life on nearby exoplanets; How do insects like ants time their emergence so precisely?


Black hole imaged, a new tiny human, rebuilding coral reefs, Treating depression with ketamine, flipper fornicates for fun and why cats purr
2019-04-12 09:00:00
Seeing the first black hole - and what we'll see next; A new tiny hominin discovery gives the 'hobbit' a distant cousin; Collapsing coral reefs - can we rebuild them?; Ketamine works its magic on depression by 'stabilizing the brain in a well state'; Female dolphins may know the joy of sex thanks to a human-like clitoris; How and why do cats purr?


The day the dinosaurs died, Soviet's race to the moon, tasmanian devils fight off cancer, Roadside testing for cannabis impairment, and Arctic landslides.
2019-04-05 09:00:00
A catastrophe frozen in time - a new fossil site shows how the dinosaurs died; The race to the moon - what the Russians were doing behind the Iron Curtain; Tasmanian Devils are learning to live with the cancer that was pushing them to extinction; Roadside THC tests do not test for impairment. How can science help?; Permafrost landslides are eating great swathes of Arctic landscape.


Erasing memories, biggest T-Rex and the smell of Parkinson's, Saturn's tiny ring moons, Google glass helps autistic kids and a supervolcano eruption
2019-03-29 09:00:00
How to remember to forget - the new science of erasing memories; Big, old and banged-up - Canada is home to the world's largest Tyrannosaurus Rex; A woman who can smell Parkinson's disease could hold the key to early diagnosis; Meet the odd little moons that interact with Saturn's spectacular rings; Google glasses could help kids with autism read emotional cues in people's faces; What would happen if the Yellowstone supervolcano exploded?


Shopping for souvenirs on an asteroid, new Cambrian explosion fossils, the gut-brain axis, why we can say 'f' words, green icebergs from Antarctica and the length of a dream
2019-03-22 09:00:00
A Japanese spacecraft visits an asteroid - and will bring back a souvenir; "Weird wonders" in China - new half-billion year-old fossils from the dawn of animal life; Your gut bacteria are actively involved in your emotions, how you think, and even behave; Our farming ancestors are the reason we can say 'f' words today; Mysterious green icebergs from Antarctica might be fertilizing the southern ocean; How long does it take to dream a dream?


Inside actors brains, inactive ingredients aren't, Super solar storms, butterfly's toxic backup, secrets life of bone and wind turbines and climate.
2019-03-15 09:00:00
Actors' brains have different activity patterns when they're in character; Inactive ingredients in your meds might not be so inactive after all; Super-powerful solar storms hit Earth in the past - and could recur in the future; When a butterfly's disguise fails, its backup plan is poison; 'Skeleton Keys' - a new book explores the secret life of bones; Do wind turbine farms have an effect on climate?


Science of awe, blue whales and sonar, chromosomes and sleep, ancient aquaculture on the west coast and dogs and human sperm quality
2019-03-08 09:00:00
Exploring the powerful emotion of awe - how it can be awe-some and aw-ful; Military sonar puts blue whales off their feed; Your brain may need sleep to repair your brain's DNA 'potholes'; Clam gardens have been cultivated by indigenous people for millenia; Man and man's best friend have both been experiencing declines in sperm quality.


The Goodness Paradox, secrets in poop, converting carbon to coal, countdown to the moon landing, selecting hygienic bees and a question of cow methane
2019-03-01 09:00:00
The Goodness Paradox - Why humans are so good and so bad; Potty talk: the secrets Kim Jong Un could be hiding in his private portable toilet; Creating coal from CO2 - undoing fossil fuel burning to save the climate; Countdown to the Moon landing - How Apollo 9 tested the lunar lander in Earth orbit; How selecting for genes to keep the hive clean could help honeybee survival; Do cows produce more methane than rotting grass?


Tiny tyrannosaur, art acne, what zebra stripes do, ageing your DNA, hacking photosynthesis and sinking in the Sun
2019-02-22 09:00:00
Tiny tyrannosaur fossil helps scientists understand how T-rex grew so large; Art gets a bad case of acne and it has conservators concerned; Zebra stripes confuse tiny predators, not the big ones;Scientists can read the 'rust' on a person's DNA to predict when they'll die; Hacking photosynthesis to re-engineer crop plants and feed the world; What would it be like to stand on the surface of the sun?


Vaping safety, breast milk pumping, evolution experiments and field mice, a needle you swallow, cosmic catastrophes and animal dementia
2019-02-15 09:00:00
Flavour chemicals in e-cigarettes could damage lung tissue; Canadian researcher proves Darwin right by jailing mice in Nebraska; Breast milk is best, but is there a problem with pumping?; Swallowing needles packed in a turtle shell to treat diabetes; 'Earth Shattering' - all the ways the universe is trying to kill us; Do animals suffer from dementia as we do?


Psychology of solitary confinement, mind over genes, genocide and climate change, searching for Shackleton's ship, a waterproof sweat sensor and how birds hunt blind.
2019-02-08 09:00:00
Months locked in a tiny box - how solitary confinement can erode mental health; When is your brain stronger than your genes? How the mind can fool the body; 50 million deaths in the New World drove cooling in the the Little Ice Age; Searching for Endurance: Antarctic researchers hunt for the relics of Antarctic adventurers; A stick-on sensor sucks in sweat and can reveal dehydration and more; How do birds find their prey when hunting in muddy water?


Rocking good sleep, music and body language, the first feathers for flight, Where's my death ray? A 300 million year old fossil walks again and sound in cold air.
2019-02-01 09:00:00
Rocking yourself to sleep improves sleep quality and memory - even in grownups; Body language could be the secret behind the sweetest music; The first feathers for flight? A 160 million year old dinosaur might have had them; How to build a death ray - a new book looks attempts to make the ultimate weapon; A Robot reconstruction of a 300-million-year-old fossil shows how it walked; Does the speed of sound change with temperature?


The Gryphon Trio in McMaster's LIVELab
2019-02-01 09:00:00
The Gryphon Trio playing 'non-expressively'


The power of super poop, preventing PTSD, counting down to Apollo 11, predators in cold water and termites conserve the rainforest
2019-01-25 09:00:00
Not all poop is created equal, and 'super-poopers' could be life savers; Preventing PTSD with a 'video game' that trains soldiers to control their brains; Countdown to the moon landing - re-live the missions that led to 'one small step for man'; Why warm-blooded predators thrive in the coldest places on Earth; Termites may be hell in your house, but they help protect the rainforest from drought.


Tuskless elephants, room temperature superconductors, how space changed a man, Men, women and pain, climate change means stronger waves and whither glacial water?
2019-01-18 09:00:00
Elephants are evolving to be tuskless after decades of poaching pressure; Discovery of room temperature superconductors could bring floating trains and more; Scott Kelly spent a year in space - and it literally changed him; Repeated pain makes men more sensitive - but not women; Waves are getting stronger and more dangerous thanks to climate change; Will Edmonton run out of water as the Columbia Icefield continues to melt?


Medieval woman painters, houseplants eat pollution, viruses that kill superbugs, Antarctica turns researchers into zombies, fresh water is getting saltier and which planets are we missing?
2019-01-11 09:00:00
Blue pigment found on a medieval woman's teeth suggests she was a skilled, literate artist; A genetically modified houseplant could suck up dangerous indoor air pollution; Viruses that kill superbugs could save lives when antibiotics don't work; Zombies in Antarctica - Isolated researchers enter 'psychological hibernation'; We're making our fresh water salty by massively changing the landscape; For every exoplanet we see transiting a star, how many go unseen?


The Quirks & Quarks Question Show
2019-01-04 09:00:00
The Q & Q Question Show for 2019 features 10 scientists each answering one listener question.


Planet hunting telescope, bioengineered lungs, the year in climate science, flying viruses, kids punish freeloaders and a lake of water on Mars
2018-12-28 09:00:00
TESS, the planet hunting space telescope, is on track to discover a sky full of exoplanets; Lab grown lungs are transplanted in pigs today, they may help humans tomorrow; The year in Climate Change: Fires and heat-waves show things are heating up; Billions of viruses are raining down on you from the upper atmosphere every day; Even kids as young as four want to punish freeloaders; A lake of water was found on Mars - and may be the first of many.


Quirks Holiday Book show - Science of the voice, talking about the weather, epigenetics and a new view of evolution and dust and rain
2018-12-21 09:00:00
A writer and sound engineer investigates the science of the human voice; Our atmosphere is a thin veneer on our planet, but this writer says it's where the action is; A revolution in evolution is turning back the clock more than 200 years, says new book; How important is dust to making it rain?


Is China winning the race to the moon, Pig heart transplants, cute aggression, dust is alive, frogs sing in the city and science engineers the perfect christmas tree
2018-12-14 09:00:00
China's race to the moon - their new lander is a small step towards a great leap; A transplanted pig's heart lives for months in a baboon - is a human trial next?; Is that baby so adorable you want to eat it up? You're committing 'cute aggression'; Your dust bunnies are alive but fighting them with antibacterials is a bad idea; Frogs sing a rich song in the city but a simpler tune in the country; Science gets the holiday spirit and produces the perfect Christmas tree; Cognitive abilities vary among humans, is the same true of other species?


Why are users taking fentanyl, making stuff with moon dust, an app to detect anemia, why octopuses are smart, the real bad guy in Alzheimer's and an absence of volcanoes?
2018-12-07 09:00:00
Drug users aren't choosing dangerous fentanyl - they don't know what's in their drugs; Selfies for health - a smartphone app can detect anemia; Making it on the Moon - 3D printing useful stuff with moon dust; The octopus might have traded its shell for intelligence; Have researchers been wrong about Alzheimer's? A new theory challenges the old story; What would happen to Earth if there were no volcanoes?


Genetically edited babies, Fast Radio Bursts, Spinal Injury patients walk again, Improving the science around medical devices, what makes words funny and bon voyage David Saint-Jaques
2018-11-30 09:00:00
Will the 'rogue science' that created genetically edited babies lead to backlash against research?; Mysterious fast radio bursts from space: Five explanations for what they could be; Spinal injury patients take steps again thanks to spinal pacemaker; A lack of scientific data behind medical implants could seriously hurt Canadians; That sounds funny - the science behind why certain words make us laugh; Canadian Astronaut David Saint-Jacques will get to watch the world go around.


Accidental domestication, a solid-state electric airplane, the science of gender identity, InSight lands on Mars, bat and dolphin sonar crosstalk and how birds find seeds.
2018-11-23 09:00:00
Captive rearing can accidentally change animals so they may not survive in the wild; A new plane with no moving parts flies by electrifying the air; Scientist refutes notion that gender identity is an 'unscientific liberal ideology'; Mars-quakes may shake the red planet, and NASA's new lander will detect them; How bats and dolphins use their sonar when everyone's talking at once; How do birds find seeds?


Greenland asteroid impact, short people in the rainforest, reef islands and sea level, stealth moths, walking on water and climbing the walls and is the night sky changing?
2018-11-16 09:00:00
An asteroid impact on Greenland left a massive crater under the ice; Will coral reef islands rise or fall? It's a greenhouse-gas paradox; How moths evolved a kind of stealth jet technology to sneak past bats; Tiny people have evolved in rainforests because it's where tiny steps are better; The mysteries of animal movement - how they walk on water and climb up walls; What are the visible changes in the night sky in the last 3,000 years?


Bitcoin's energy costs, beatboxers invent new sounds, wind farms change lizards, chucking salmon for science, piranha barking, smells and mapping, and heat and humidity.
2018-11-09 09:00:00
Bitcoin mining uses more energy than mining for real gold; Beatboxers have invented whole new ways of making sounds; Wind farms in India are driving a population boom of skinny, fearless lizards; For 20 years, scientists have been chucking fish into the forest. Here's why; Barking piranhas and screeching catfish are the sounds of the Amazon River; Sniffing your way around - our brains are built to navigate by scent; Why does humidity make us feel hotter in the summer and colder in winter?


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