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Roadway pollution, fungus promotes pancreatic cancer, the bang in the Big Bang, infant eels magnetic migration and the pathway to Mars. from Quirks and Quarks Complete Show from CBC Radio

From Quirks and Quarks Complete Show from CBC Radio - Pollution sniffing investigators find air near roads is high in contaminants; A common fungus may drive tumour growth in pancreatic cancer; The universe was full of cold goop, then came the big bang; Infant eels use the moon and an internal compass to finish their trans-ocean migration; Pathway to Mars — what's the biggest challenge, money or technology?


Quirks and Quarks Complete Show from CBC Radio
CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks covers the quirks of the expanding universe to the quarks within a single atom... and everything in between.

Roadway pollution, fungus promotes pancreatic cancer, the bang in the Big Bang, infant eels magnetic migration and the pathway to Mars.
2019-11-01 09:00:00
Pollution sniffing investigators find air near roads is high in contaminants; A common fungus may drive tumour growth in pancreatic cancer; The universe was full of cold goop, then came the big bang; Infant eels use the moon and an internal compass to finish their trans-ocean migration; Pathway to Mars — what's the biggest challenge, money or technology?
54 minutes, 11 seconds


Apr 4 Testing for COVID-19, blood plasma clinical trials to begin, vaccine development, COVID threatens mountain gorillas and these boots were made for running
2020-04-02 21:10:00
How we test for the COVID-19 virus – and how can we do it faster? COVID-19 could be treated with blood plasma from those who've recovered. We need vaccines for the coronavirus – here's how we'll make them. The coronavirus could threaten endangered mountain gorillas. Electric assist running boots may be the future of recreational jogging.


Mar 28: Mobilizing scientists in the COVID 19 fight, riding the COVID wave, NASA's space salad and Escobar's hippos are restoring an ecosystem
2020-03-26 21:10:00
Scientists are mobilizing from the ground up and the top down in our war against COVID-19. Can we control the pandemic and move from 'flattening the curve' to 'riding the wave'. Salads in space: NASA has learned to grow lettuce on the space station. How Pablo Escobar's escaped hippos are helping to restore an ancient ecosystem


COVID vulnerability, COVID and climate, iring a cannonball at an asteroid and a fossil 'wonderchicken'
2020-03-19 21:10:00
How aging increases vulnerability to COVID-19 and how pollution can make it worse. COVID-19 has led to huge emissions reductions – can we learn from this? 'Wonderchicken' walked among the dinosaurs just before the mass extinction. Japanese space scientists shoot an asteroid to learn about its past.


Coronavirus epidemiology, Greenland glaciers melt, squatting a better way to be sedentary and SmartICE supports northern life
2020-03-12 21:10:00
COVID-19: Why reacting early and aggressively is the key to avoiding crisis; How the Greenland Ice Sheet is melting from the bottom up; Squat, don't sit: The way we are sedentary could make a big difference in our health; SmartICE: Supporting Inuit knowledge of the landscape with technology.


Coronavirus epidemiology, Greenland glaciers melt, squatting a better way to be sedentary, SmartICE supports northern life
2020-03-12 21:10:00
COVID-19: Why reacting early and aggressively is the key to avoiding crisis; How the Greenland Ice Sheet is melting from the bottom up; Squat, don't sit: The way we are sedentary could make a big difference in our health; SmartICE: Supporting Inuit knowledge of the landscape with technology.


New technology gives amputees a hand, a big dam proposal, your dog's heat sensitive nose, was the Earth once a waterworld, the fight to be the first female astronaut and composting garbage
2020-03-05 21:10:00
'It's like you have a hand again' A major breakthrough in robotic limb technology; Is damming the entire North Sea a realistic way to defend against sea level rise?; Your dog's cold wet nose may help it 'see' in infrared; Ancient ocean crust suggests Earth was once almost entirely covered in water; The tale of the two female pilots who could have been the first women in space; Would leaving compostables in with the garbage help break the garbage down?


Coronavirus containment window closing, whale skin care, gingko trees eternal youth, does cloud seeding work, and SmartICE supports Inuit knowledge
2020-02-27 21:10:00
We may have passed the tipping point in the COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak; Whales may migrate to warm water for a full body exfoliation; Long-lived trees may have found the cellular secret to theoretical immortality; We've been cloud seeding for decades, but now we finally know if it works; Walrus knocking, seals trilling – these are the sounds of the Arctic; Why do some animals lay eggs, and others give live birth?


Coronavirus containment window closing, whale skin care, gingko trees eternal youth, does cloud seeding work, and Does cloud seeding work, and listening to the sounds of the Arctic ocean
2020-02-27 21:10:00
We may have passed the tipping point in the COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak; Whales may migrate to warm water for a full body exfoliation; Long-lived trees may have found the cellular secret to theoretical immortality; We've been cloud seeding for decades, but now we finally know if it works; Walrus knocking, seals trilling – these are the sounds of the Arctic; Why do some animals lay eggs, and others give live birth?


Introducing The Dose with Dr. Brian Goldman
2020-02-24 21:10:00
The Dose is a new weekly podcast that answers everyday health questions like: What vaccines do adults need? Does your Fitbit actually make you fitter? Or, should I bother taking vitamins? Dr. Brian Goldman and the team behind White Coat Black Art bring you the best science from top experts in about the same amount of time as an appointment with your GP. Subscribe to The Dose at smarturl.it/thedosecbc


Live animal markets and viruses, largest turtle's horned shell, a robot for Europa, jewel beetles iridescent camouflage, better talk on climate change and flying west
2020-02-20 21:10:00
Tracking the spread of viruses in live animal markets by building one in a lab; The largest turtle that ever lived had fighting horns on its shell; NASA's building a robot to explore Jupiter's moon Europa - from underneath it's icy shell; Vivid and fabulous jewel beetles actually use their colours for camouflage; Why the way we talk about climate change makes some people stop listening; How can planes travel against the rotation of the Earth?


Agriculture moving north, Arrakoth's secrets, the microbiome for flight, isheries science with indigenous perspective, slippery surface and seasons on other planets
2020-02-13 21:10:00
Wheat and potatoes in Nunavut? Climate change could bring agriculture to the North; Arrakoth reveals how the solar systems building blocks were built; The secret to flight in birds and bats is not just wings, it's guts; Bringing 'two eyed seeing' – indigenous knowledge and science to fisheries conservation; Canadian scientists engineer self-cleaning surface that can repel dangerous bacteria; Do other planets in the solar system have orbital tilt and seasons?


Coronavirus treatment, parentese helps baby talk, seals clap back, splicing damaged nerves, getting astronauts to Mars healthy and sane and smoke on glaciers
2020-02-06 21:10:00
Treating the coronavirus: improvising now, but with real hope on the horizon; 'Parentese' is not just baby talk. It boosts baby's language skills; Gunshot-loud underwater clapping could be how grey seals intimidate rivals and attract mates; New implantable nerve guide tricks severed nerves into growing together again; Pathway to Mars – Can we get astronauts to Mars sane and healthy?; Has smoke and soot from the Australian wildfires made its way to the Antarctic?


Understanding the coronavirus, cyborg jellyfish, judging cat pain, an AI knows how you dance and Canada's newest and youngest astronaut
2020-01-30 21:10:00
Tracking coronaviruses post SARS – how science has made for rapid response; Wiring jellyfish for speed – what modding a sea creature can tell us about the ocean; Me-owch – could resting cat face tell us about kitty's pain?; Forget face recognition – an AI can tell who you are by how you dance; Canada's newest astronaut is a scientist fascinated by fire.


Intermittent fasting, the math of espresso, biological bricks, scurvy in modern Canada, snake venom sans snakes and chile tolerance.
2020-01-23 21:10:00
Intermittent fasting – why not eating (for a bit) could work for weight loss and health; Brewing a better espresso with less coffee and more math; Bringing biology to bricks – concrete details on how to grow building materials; Avast! Scurvy is still a health issue in 21st century Canada; Fangs very much. Scientists use stem cells to make snake venom – without the snake; How come I can't tolerate spicy foods, but my kids can?


Ancient gum preserves genome, a living robot, wolf puppies play fetch, rattlesnakes skin holds raindrops for drinking, science of imagination and quiet snow.
2020-01-16 21:10:00
Ancient chewing gum reveals reveals identity of chewer and what she ate; Scientists create a robot made entirely of living cells; Wolf, fetch! How scientists discovered a 'domesticated' trait in wolves; Rattlesnakes have skin that's sticky for raindrops so they can sip from their scales; Exploring the science of imagination, so we can build a creative computer; Why does a snowfall damp sound so well?


Fires in Australia, cuttlefish watch 3D movies, coal pollution harms crops, fossils show ancient parenting, first evidence of cooked vegetables, and why so much poop?
2020-01-09 21:10:00
'A billion animals gone' – understanding the effects of Australia's fires on wildlife and people; Pass the popcorn - scientists are playing 3D movies to cuttlefish; The cost of coal - pollution takes lives, but also costs food; Cape Breton fossils are the oldest evidence of parental behaviour; Burned roots are the first evidence of humans cooking vegetables and sharing food; Why do we seem to generate so much poop?


The Quirks & Quarks Listener Question show - where we answer your questions. Why dinosaurs are so big, why winter skies are so clear and much more.
2020-01-02 21:10:00
The annual Quirks & Quarks Listener Question show


Quirks & Quarks year in review We look at some of the most significant science stories we covered (and one we didn't) in 2019
2019-12-26 21:10:00
Another tragic and destructive year for wildfires – is this the new normal?; Year of reckoning for nutritional science – red meat studies point the way forward; Arctic ice losses were at near record levels – with particular concerns about Greenland melt; Measles sabotages the immune system – so it's much more dangerous than we'd realized .


Quirks Holiday Book Show: Three science books looking at forensic ecology, the many worlds of quantum mechanics and culinary extinction
2019-12-19 21:10:00
Exploring culinary extinction: the foods we have eaten out of existence; How quantum particles could spawn an infinity of new universes – and we never notice them; Tales of a forensic ecologist – tracking criminals with pollen and spores.


Saving the ozone helped climate change, extra-solar comet, great auk extinction, rockets for Mars, concussions and brain hemispheres and a question of cloud cover
2019-12-12 21:10:00
When we saved the ozone layer we saved ourselves from even worse climate change; An interstellar visitor could be lighting up for astronomers in time for the holidays; Penguin-like great auk extinction has human signature all over it; NASA, SpaceX, a former astronaut: Who will build the rocket that takes us to Mars?; Concussions can damage the connection that helps your left brain talk to the right; As water covers most of the Earth, why isn't it completely shrouded in clouds?


Inflammation and the brain, NASA visits the Sun, climate shrinks birds, ancient paint from lake goo, smelling without olfactory bulbs, and tweeting birds.
2019-12-05 21:10:00
Our brains could be collateral damage in our body's fight against infection; NASA's mission to touch the sun releases its first results; Songbirds are shrinking, probably because of climate change; Ancient indigenous people made durable rock paint from lake goo; Scientists surprised to discover women lacking olfactory bulbs who smell just fine; Do different species of birds understand each other's tweets?


Inflammation and the brain, NASA visits the sun, climate shrinks birds, ancient paint from lake goo, smelling without olfactory bulbs and tweeting birds.
2019-12-05 21:10:00
Our brains could be collateral damage in our body's fight against infection; NASA's mission to touch the sun reveals 'rogue waves' and flipping magnetic fields; Songbirds are shrinking and climate change may be to blame; Ancient Indigenous people made durable rock paint from lake goo; Scientists surprised to discover women lacking olfactory bulbs can smell just fine; Do different species of birds understand each other's tweets?


Tipping into climate catastrophe, blue whale heartbeat, thinking twice on fake news, a swift-swimming tunabot and the life of an 'under-wolf'
2019-11-28 21:10:00
Climate scientists warn we're on the precipice of disastrous 'tipping points'; Thar she beats! The challenge of measuring a blue whale's pulse; Think twice about posting once – breaking the fake news cycle; Imitating a swift-swimming fish helps researchers build a speedy 'tunabot'; The triumphant life of an 'under-wolf' in Yellowstone.


Psychedelics and 'waking-dreams,' adding feeling to virtual reality, the greatest ape, AI learns how music affects us, foreign accent syndrome and the latitude of venomous animals.
2019-11-21 21:10:00
The psychedelic DMT modifies brain waves to produce 'waking-dreams'; New device adds a sense of touch to virtual reality; The greatest ape – an extinct, half-ton monster – now has its place on our family tree; Machines on music - An AI figures out how music tickles your brain and your body; 'Now I have a lovely Scottish brogue' – The science behind foreign accent syndrome; Why are there fewer venomous animals in colder climates?


Watching wildfire with radar, the return of race science, laundry and microplastic, submarines for your bloodstream and oxygen for airplanes.
2019-11-14 21:10:00
New high-powered radar gives scientists a 3D view of wildfires in real time; The return of race science – the quest to fortify racism with bad biology; Your laundry and plastic pollution – which fabrics shed the most microplastics; Tiny submarines could make a 'fantastic voyage' into our bodies; How do high-flying airplanes have enough oxygen for their engines?


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