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No more fish? from The Science Show

From The Science Show - Fish of the eastern Pacific Wild fish catch easily replaced by aquaculture Barramundi breeding restocks our tropical northern rivers National Youth Science Forum boosts young people keen on science Fixing the climate emergency must start now - Johan Rockström part 8, final


The Science Show
RN's science flagship: your essential source of what's making news in the complex world of scientific research, scandal and discovery. The Science Show with Robyn Williams is one of the longest running programs on Australian radio.

No more fish?
2020-10-16 18:05:51
Fish of the eastern Pacific Wild fish catch easily replaced by aquaculture Barramundi breeding restocks our tropical northern rivers National Youth Science Forum boosts young people keen on science Fixing the climate emergency must start now - Johan Rockström part 8, final
54 minutes, 9 seconds


No more fish?
2020-10-16 18:05:51
Fish of the eastern Pacific Wild fish catch easily replaced by aquaculture Barramundi breeding restocks our tropical northern rivers National Youth Science Forum boosts young people keen on science Fixing the climate emergency must start now - Johan Rockström part 8, final


The North Pole, gentle robots and the future of AI
2020-10-09 18:05:19
2020 Nobel Prizes. Ten steps for best chance of climate stability - Johan Rockström part 7. Designing our AI future. New roles for robots. The Pilbara - test ground for NASA with school students keen to learn about their ancient land.


Three exceptional women
2020-10-02 19:05:54
Lecture - Futures Past and Possible: Histories of and for Tomorrow


Venus - another prompt for the regeneration of science?
2020-09-25 19:05:22



How to eliminate CO2 emissions from agriculture? The answer lies in the soil!
2020-09-18 19:05:37
US west coast ablaze. The Amazon regulates the planet's climate and we're burning it - Johan Rockström part 4. Soils can play a major role in storing carbon. Conservation co-op provides connection to community and nature. Meteorites bring information about the early solar system.


Pipsqueak dinosaurs - How did they become top monsters?
2020-09-11 19:05:02
Urgent action required to steer clear of climate tipping points - Johan Rockström part 3. Thermal bricks could assist transition to renewable energy. Young people at risk from online gambling. Dinosaurs - from pipsqueaks to monsters. Children's book features adventures with reptiles.


Can you have a BBQ 40,000 years before people land?
2020-09-04 19:05:29
Stressed planet sending clear warning signs - Johan Rockström part 2. The nudge which opened the door to mathematics. Shells and blackened rocks on the Victorian coast dated to 40,000 years before first people believed to be in Australia. STEM Superstar says go for it! Patient Zero


Lithium potential for Australia and time running out climate change action
2020-08-28 19:05:38
Window closing for action to stabilise the Earth's climate. Cleaner air delivers LA health and economic benefits. Lithium processing a new opportunity for Australia. Children's book about surgeon Fiona Wood. STEM Superstar prompts government probe on masks. South Georgia Island once rat infested, becomes a rat-free bird sanctuary.


New ideas about our food choices and how taste and pleasure have helped drive evolution
2020-08-21 19:05:22
What really controls our eating decisions? How our bodies tell us what to eat. Taste and pleasure of food offer a new way to understand evolution.


Shall we join the quantum revolution?
2020-08-14 19:05:17
Scientists urged to keep waving the flag. UNSW launches new degree in quantum engineering. Startup building the infrastructure for quantum computing. Reducing the data, energy and emissions of big data computing. Designing the computers of tomorrow. Lasers support our modern way of life.


Dr Dolittle turns 100 and the complex behaviour of birds
2020-08-07 19:05:48
Dr Dolittle turns 100, The Bird Way: a new look at how birds talk, work, play, parent and think and flies dance to lure their mate


The seaweed revolution and keeping brains fit
2020-07-31 19:05:04
The stars that time forgot - at the edge of our galaxy. Protect your hippocampus with exercise, diet, socialising and sex. Rope-like filaments common to rouge brain proteins. Kinky proteins suspected cause for Alzheimer's. Microalgae the basis for fuels, food and more. New seaweed processing plant opens in southern NSW. Singing frogs bid farewell to Mike Tyler.


The history of Boeing and the future of passenger flight
2020-07-24 19:05:45
Basics of naming in biology, museum returns human remains to traditional communities, the history of Boeing and the future of passenger flight, space rockets being developed in Queensland.


The Pilbara - used by ancient people and NASA, blown up by Rio Tinto
2020-07-17 19:05:46
Pilbara used by NASA to prepare for Mars missions. Pilbara Aboriginal site destroyed by Rio Tinto. Predicting earthquakes. Evolution of angiosperms. Mike Tyler reflects on Joseph Banks.


The Frog Man remembered + global genomes
2020-07-10 19:05:09



Are physicists bonkers?
2020-07-03 19:05:37



Could there be a Goldilocks Universe? And how to save our seahorses
2020-06-26 19:05:11



RN's Big Weekend of Books
2020-06-19 19:05:39



The Science Show shares some of its favourite books
2020-06-19 19:05:39
From mathematics and mammoths to the woman who found out what stars are made of: Robyn Williams and Carl Smith talk about books with Eddie Woo, Sharon Gilstrow, Zofia Witkowski-Blake, Craig Cormick, Danielle Clode and Chris Flynn.


Vale the professor of everything
2020-06-12 19:05:02



Climate grief 3 - How comedians approach climate change
2020-06-05 19:05:24



Tiahni Adamson - first ever Indigenous Time at Sea Scholarship recipient and how hard it is to read faces.
2020-05-29 19:05:06



Fear for the Amazon, and a chance to compost yourself!
2020-05-22 19:05:02
The plunder and destruction of the vast Amazon forests have been so terrible, that by 2035, they will cease to be a sink for CO2. The burning was so bad last year that the holocaust featured on the cover of The Economist magazine. This week The Science Show receives its first report from Ignacio Amigo who lives in Manaus and writes for the journal Nature. 


Fear for The Amazon, and a chance to compost yourself!
2020-05-22 19:05:02
The plunder and destruction of the vast Amazon forests have been so terrible, that by 2035, they will cease to be a sink for CO2. The burning was so bad last year that the holocaust featured on the cover of The Economist magazine. This week The Science Show receives its first report from Ignacio Amigo who lives in Manaus and writes for the journal Nature. 


Climate grief 2 - Singer-songwriter Missy Higgins
2020-05-15 19:05:57
Missy describes the emotions - and the science - that have inspired her songs about her grief for our rapidly changing climate.


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