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Where DID the Moon come from? from The Science Show

From The Science Show - What can time-travelling seeds teach us about climate change? Five schools across four continents look to the stars together Under the stars: a new book introducing children to astrophysics Where DID the Moon come from? The Moon: A History for the Future


The Science Show
RN's science flagship: your essential source of what's making news in the complex world of scientific research, scandal and discovery. The Science Show with Robyn Williams is one of the longest running programs on Australian radio.

Where DID the Moon come from?
2019-09-20 19:05:00
What can time-travelling seeds teach us about climate change? Five schools across four continents look to the stars together Under the stars: a new book introducing children to astrophysics Where DID the Moon come from? The Moon: A History for the Future
54 minutes, 7 seconds


A wire around the world
2020-02-14 17:05:16



The new science of success
2020-02-07 17:05:43



The formula - the new science of success
2020-02-07 17:05:43



A journalist's view of The Australian's anti-science campaign, changes in energy and transport, and a boost for innovation.
2020-01-31 17:05:04



The Coastline - as vital as your skin. Keep it healthy or we die.
2020-01-24 17:05:58



How bees see, how fish change their sex and a poem on bushfires, climate, politics and society
2020-01-17 17:05:33



Science Extra: 2019 in space
2020-01-15 10:00:00
The first image of a black hole, Apollo 11 celebrations, and the successes and failures of 2019's satellite missions. Plus what to expect from the Mars-bound missions in 2020.


Carl Zimmer explores the history of our understanding of heredity
2020-01-10 17:05:13



Science Extra: 2019 in environment
2020-01-08 10:00:00
Droughts, fires, and discussions around climate change intensified in 2019. A recap of the year in environment news, and a glimpse of what's to come in 2020.


Melting ice and burning forests signs of a changing world
2020-01-03 17:05:37
3. The importance of Antarctica for the Earth's climate


Science Extra: 2019 in science
2020-01-01 10:00:00
From quantum 'supremacy' to deep life, catch up on the big themes from a busy year of science. Plus will scientists build a brand new eukaryote in 2020?


Identifying cholera and de-extinction - should we bring back extinct animals?
2019-12-27 17:05:39
2. Resurrection - should we try to bring back extinct animals?


Science Extra: 2019 in health
2019-12-25 10:00:00
Recapping the dangers of vaping and e-cigarettes, and the latest trials aimed at warding off Alzheimer's disease. Plus what's ahead in health news for 2020?


The role of forensic science in criminal investigations
2019-12-20 17:05:55
This discussion from the World Science Festival in Brisbane explores the forensic techniques used to convict 21st century criminals and the issues presented for those in science and the law.


Big themes for 2020 - Youth, identity, climate, AI and always, birds.
2019-12-13 17:05:01
* Zofia bids farewell to her school days * Roots revives early memories of racial abuse for science writer Michael Brooks * Bird Haven festival celebrates the joy of birds * Move aside big banana and big prawn, here comes the big periodic table * Is there life beyond carbon? * Marilyn Renfree - Academy honours a lifetime of research * The march of artificial Intelligence


Teenagers design museum galleries
2019-12-06 17:05:16



Seaweed, sex and nano
2019-11-29 17:05:35
Nanotechnology brings new challenges, new solutions Quantum computing promises new computing capabilities Micro algae show potential to replace fossil fuel-based products Heartbreak pain is like physical pain to the brain Ode to Antarctica PLC student Phoebe Adam honoured in 2019 Bragg Student Prize for Science Writing


Uglies, parrots and Leonardo da Vinci
2019-11-22 17:05:18
Why climate change denial persists Abbotsleigh student Arwyn Stone wins 2019 Bragg Student Prize for Science Writing Ugly animals on parade in the Illustrated Encyclopaedia of Ugly Animals Insurance policy for frogs in decline Increasing the efficiency of silicon solar panels Celebrating Leonardo da Vinci Thinking Like a Parrot


Dinos, Denisovans and tipping complexity
2019-11-15 17:05:18
Self-interest preventing progress on world problems It wasn't an instant goodnight for all when the asteroid hit Emptying the dustbin to assemble the Iguanodontian tree Opalised dinosaur to star in a film and a new museum Tracing distribution of ancient humans A new approach to treating pancreatic cancer Ancient reefs reveal early history of life on Earth


Where are the birds? And mould-breaking young scientists
2019-11-08 17:05:07
After 180 years, suddenly we know more about breasts Magic mushroom compound psilocybin shows promise for treatment of anxiety and depression How to build affection for city rivers Insects feeling the heat of changing climate Oxford encourages swifts with a tower of nesting boxes Birds threatened by rapid climate change Unnatural Selection explores and compares selective breeding with natural selection


Is nuclear safe? Plus, a stroll through the science of secrets
2019-11-01 18:05:28
Gerry Thomas questions our fear of nuclear power Could California save the Tarkine by leasing it? The University of Newcastle looks at new uni model, new energy options Electrolysis may help pull carbon dioxide from the atmosphere Look at our beautiful website! You can trust us! British grapes roasted by extreme heat London's Science Museum presents Top Secret: From ciphers to cyber security


The cancer-causing addictive drug, fourth in line after caffeine, alcohol and nicotine, gets no research
2019-10-25 18:05:27
UNSW celebrates 70 years Prime Minister's Prizes for Innovators and Innovation 2019 Prime Minister's Prizes for Science Teaching in Primary and Secondary Schools 2019 STEM careers extend throughout industry Linking climate passion with education and careers Betel quid - fourth most commonly consumed drug after caffeine, alcohol and nicotine, but this cancer-causing addiction gets no research


Growing fish near old power stations
2019-10-18 18:05:55
Latrobe Valley aquifer could power new industries New efficiencies coming for the mining industry Eucs a new source of graphene Prime Minister's Prizes for Science 2019 Should we communicate with ET?


Transformed coal brings promise of new smart industries
2019-10-11 18:05:20
Nobel Prizes 2019 PhD candidate investigates proteins and DNA in resistant breast cancer cells Newcastle University helps city move from smokestacks to innovative industries Transforming coal to a high value resource, not one that is burnt for 10c per Warming England has mice on the move Robots allow scientists a few more hours sleep How physics inspires and consoles Tim Radford


Meet the first female editor of Nature, and who are the orphans of Apollo?
2019-10-04 19:05:04
Nature celebrates 150 years New missions bring new excitement for the Moon The mystery and complexity of our sense of smell Lignin a possible basis for new bioplastics Polluting petrochemical solvent replaced by green biochemical alternative


Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Manoush's Favorites: Moving Forward
We're hard at work on new episodes of the TED Radio Hour, which will start rolling out in March. In the meantime, new host Manoush Zomorodi shares some of her favorite episodes of the show. This episode originally aired on June 21, 2019. When the life you've built slips out of your grasp, you're often told it's best to move on. But is that true? Instead of forgetting the past, TED speakers describe how we can move forward with it. Guests include writers Nora McInerny and Suleika Jaouad, and human rights advocate Lindy Lou Isonhood.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#551 Translating Science, Part 2
This week on Science for the People, we're discussing how Siksika become one of the official translation languages for press releases from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). The area of the world that is now known as Canada has an abundance of distinct languages; according to the 2016 Census, over 70 are still spoken. But the British government, and then the Canadian government, spent generations trying to prevent children from learning these languages. One of the languages spoken in the prairies is Siksika, also called Blackfoot (the English translation). Host Marion Kilgour speaks to Sharon Yellowfly and Corey Gray...
Now Playing: Radiolab

The Other Latif: Episode 2
The Other Latif Radiolab's Latif Nasser always believed his name was unique, singular, completely his own. Until one day when he makes a bizarre and shocking discovery. He shares his name with another man: Abdul Latif Nasser, detainee 244 at Guantanamo Bay. The U.S. government paints a terrifying picture of The Other Latif as Al-Qaeda's top explosives expert, and one of the most important advisors to Osama bin Laden. Nasser's lawyer claims that he was at the wrong place at the wrong time, and that he was never even in Al-Qaeda. This clash leads Radiolab's Latif into a years-long investigation, picking apart evidence, attempting to separate fact from fiction, and trying to uncover what this man actually did or didn't do. Along the way, Radiolab's Latif reflects on American values and his own religious past, and wonders how his namesake, a fellow nerdy, suburban Muslim kid, may have gone down such a strikingly different path.   Episode 2: Morocco Latif travels to Abdul Latif's hometown of Casablanca, Morocco, to try and find out: was he radicalized? And if so, how? Latif begins by visiting the man's family, but the family's reaction to him gets complicated as Latif digs for the truth. He finds out surprising information on a political group Abdul Latif joined in his youth, his alleged onramp to extremism. Tensions escalate when Latif realizes he's being tailed.  Read more about Abdul Latif Nasser at the New York Times' Guantanamo Docket.  This episode was produced by Sarah Qari, Suzie Lechtenberg, and Latif Nasser. With help from Tarik El Barakah and Amira Karaoud. Fact checking by Diane Kelly and Margot Williams. Editing by Jad Abumrad and Soren Wheeler. Original music by Jad Abumrad, Alex Overington, and Amino Belyamani.