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Living Planet: Defining wilderness from Living Planet

From Living Planet - Today on the show, we're exploring ideas of wilderness, what rights nature has and how difficult it is to separate people from our concept of the natural world, and why doing so can be harmful. We also hear about some hungry wild animals who are missing humans during the coronavirus pandemic.


Living Planet
Every Thursday, a new episode of Living Planet brings you environment stories from around the world, digging deeper into topics that touch our lives every day.

Living Planet: Defining wilderness
2020-06-10 07:55:00
Today on the show, we're exploring ideas of wilderness, what rights nature has and how difficult it is to separate people from our concept of the natural world, and why doing so can be harmful. We also hear about some hungry wild animals who are missing humans during the coronavirus pandemic.
29 minutes, 56 seconds


Living Planet: Cleaner cities, cleaner crops
2020-08-06 07:20:00
We discover the benefits of city trees and visit one of the world's largest urban farms in Paris. We learn about the dangers of smog for crops – and explore Nairobi on e-vehicles.


Living Planet: Endangered, in danger
2020-07-30 07:00:00
In this week's show – how this year was again deadly for environmental defenders, dehorning rhinos to save them, and protecting the most endangered whale on Earth. Plus, COVID-19 challenges women working on environmental issues around the world.


Living Planet: Cleaning up our closets
2020-07-23 06:30:00
Fast fashion can be harmful for the planet – from its origin until the end of its lifecycle. So how can we buy more sustainable clothes and extend the usability of what we already have? This week we take a look at what's in our closet and its impact on the environment.


Living Planet: Can't see the forest ...
2020-07-16 07:20:00
... for the trees? We head to old-growth forest in eastern Australia, where indigenous communities are fighting to protect the land from loggers, and visit a living forest laboratory in Germany. We'll also find out why Senegal's plans to build a green wall of trees have faltered, and what Siberia's fires mean for the climate.


Living Planet: Can't see the forest...
2020-07-16 05:23:00
...for the trees. This week on the show, we head to an old-growth forest in eastern Australia, where indigenous communities are fighting to protect the land from loggers, and visit a living forest laboratory in Germany. We'll also find out why Senegal's plans to build a wall of trees have faltered, and what Siberia's wildfires mean for the climate.


Living Planet: Biodiversity vs. extinction
2020-07-09 07:20:00
Although the diversity of plants and animals on Earth is crucial for our survival, humans are wiping out millions of species. We delve into Earth's sixth mass extinction – and what can be done to stop it. We'll look at whether China's ban on the consumption of wildlife will help protect species there, and visit a biodiversity museum in Panama.


Living Planet: Splish, splash, comeback!
2020-07-02 07:20:00
We hear about how some aquatic animals are undergoing a revival: Record numbers of sea turtles have nested on the Odisha coast in India, while corals in the Red Sea get a break from people. In Yorkshire, beavers are returning to streams – and, caring for crocodiles in Belize.


Living Planet: Time for our next evolution?
2020-06-25 07:00:00
Economies driven by growth, at cost to nature – surely there is some other way. In an interview, green economist Pavan Sukhdev says it's time for humanity to go through its next evolution. In part 2 of this special with On the Green Fence, hosts discuss: Does change need to happen first in our heads, and how about a hard look at what we really value?


Living Planet: Must civilization end?
2020-06-18 07:00:00
To save the Earth, people like radical environmentalist Derrick Jensen advocate ending civilization and sending humans back to the Stone Age. In this special, Living Planet producers talk to On the Green Fence podcasters about the end of civilization: Should it and could it be done? What sustainable alternatives are there? Featuring an interview with Jensen.


Living Planet: Defining wilderness
2020-06-10 07:55:00
Today on the show, we're exploring ideas of wilderness, what rights nature has and how difficult it is to separate people from our concept of the natural world, and why doing so can be harmful. We also hear about some hungry wild animals who are missing humans during the coronavirus pandemic.


Living Planet: Off the beaten path
2020-06-04 06:15:00
This week, we find out how coronavirus restrictions are driving change in cities – from the way urban dwellers get around, to how they think about food. We'll go foraging for edible plants in London, join a bike-riding lesson in Paris, and visit a backyard vegetable plot in Los Angeles.


Living Planet: Sounds of the sea
2020-05-28 07:00:00
Although oceans cover more than two-thirds of the Earth, we don't often hear what goes on beneath the surface. This week: How playing sound underwater could be used to help revive coral reefs – and the ways human noise pollution is muddying the marine soundscape. Also, South Africa's humpback whales make a stunning comeback.


Living Planet: Personal choice & systemic problems
2020-05-20 07:15:00
Today on the show we examine personal choice in relation to CO2 emissions and other environmental issues. What changes have we made in our homes and lives to reduce our impacts on the Earth? And how much do these decisions actually matter amidst the global realities of climate change?


Living Planet: A twisted affinity for animals
2020-05-14 07:15:00
We take a closer look at our relationship with animals. How are wild and domesticated animals managing in Madrid during lockdown? Why are India's holy cows suffering? What alternatives are there to eating meat? And, should we be cloning our pets?


Living Planet: Reinventing energy
2020-05-07 07:00:00
The tiny nation of Guyana is pinning development hopes on oil despite the price crash, Germany's renewables hit a new record, and projects to boost biogas and solar in Africa.


Living Planet: Cement factories suck Indonesia dry
2020-04-30 07:00:00
Villagers in the Kendeng mountains of Java are fighting for their livelihoods as a growing number of cement factories threaten their water supply. Resistance against those in power has a long tradition in the region, which is home to the country's oldest social movement. Thomas Kruchem met up with some of the modern leaders of this movement for this in-depth documentary.


Living Planet: Coronavirus & the environment – unexpected outcomes
2020-04-24 02:30:00
As parts of the world begin to carefully navigate their way out of the crisis, a few surprising consequences of the COVID-19 shutdown are coming to light. From a clear reduction in air pollution levels to reigniting important discussions about the future of renewable energy amid the oil price crash, the environmental effects of the pandemic will be felt for years to come.


Living Planet: In search of clean cobalt
2020-04-17 01:30:00
Cobalt is one of the most important raw materials used to make batteries for smartphones, tablets and e-cars. About two thirds of cobalt comes from the Democratic Republic of Congo. In addition to the big industrial mines, there are many small makeshift mines where even children source the raw material, risking their lives. Linda Staude went to explore.


Living Planet: Coronavirus & the environment – necessary changes
2020-04-09 05:10:00
All around the world right now, everyone is feeling the impacts of the coronavirus pandemic – and that goes for our environment, too. From finding ways to still get out into nature in times of social distancing to maintaining the agricultural supply chain, we explore how this virus is changing the way we interact with the world around us.


Living Planet: Water – a limited resource
2020-03-19 05:19:00
The purity of global water supplies faces numerous threats. In celebration of World Water Day, we hear about pressures on a freshwater lagoon in Spain, pharmaceutical water contamination in India, how the Rhine River in Germany cured its contamination problem, and how climate change endangers the Rio Grande in the southwestern United States.


Living Planet: Growing solutions
2020-03-12 06:32:00
As governments strive to wean themselves off fossil fuels, we visit Sweden to find out why wood could be key for a net-zero carbon future. We'll also head to Brazil, where activists are replanting trees obliterated by last year's catastrophic fires. Plus, Rob Greenfield, a self-proclaimed "dude making a difference," tells us how he started foraging for food to live a more sustainable existence.


Living Planet: The persistence of plastic
2020-03-05 07:30:00
Plastic – it's forever, quite literally, as it only breaks down into ever-smaller pieces. Worldwide, communities are seeking solutions to this persistent problem. Rome is rolling out an inventive idea for how to manage used plastic bottles in its subways. A Rwandan DW journalist talks about how Africa's plastic bag bans are faring. Plus, single-use plastic in the medical sector – what can be done?


Living Planet: Greening spaces
2020-02-27 05:56:00
What's the role of sports when it comes to climate change? Spanish soccer club Real Betis has committed to reducing its carbon footprint. Tea producers in Kenya experiment with a sugarcane waste product that could help reduce demand for firewood and in turn help curb deforestation. We also talk about the sound of soil and why it's important.


Living Planet: Toxic times
2020-02-20 07:31:00
How clean is our snow? Is it safe to eat for dogs? Scientists have found traces of dangerous substances in Lake Victoria, Africa's biggest lake. And what to do with Fukushima's radioactive water and other nuclear waste in our oceans.


Living Planet: Battery powered
2020-02-13 06:30:00
This week on the show, we take a look at lithium-ion batteries – how they are both necessary to ending our dependence on fossil fuels and how our increased demand for lithium is affecting communities on either side of the globe. We also hear about how the UK is using a citizens' assembly to find the best solutions to address climate change.


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