Trump Tests Positive For Coronavirus, COVID-19 Fact Check, SciFri Book Club. Oct. 2, 2020, Part 1 from Science Friday

From Science Friday - The news hit us overnight: President Trump, the First Lady, and at least one member of the president's staff tested positive for COVID-19. Just before 1 a.m. ET, the president tweeted that "Tonight, @FLOTUS and I tested positive for COVID-19. We will begin our quarantine and recovery process immediately. We will get through this TOGETHER!" Sean Conley, the White House physician, confirmed the positive COVID test and said that, "The President and First Lady are both well at this time, and they plan to remain at home within the White House during their convalescence." The president reportedly has mild symptoms of the virus. Joining Ira to talk about the medical ramifications and possibilities presented by the president's infection with COVID-19 is Angela Rasmussen, an associate research scientist in the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in New York, New York. Plus, this week, the U.S. had its first televised presidential debate of the election season. It was interesting, to say the least. During the debate, the President's COVID-19 response came under question, prompting President Trump to allege the U.S. is just weeks away from a COVID-19 vaccine. This isn't the first time Trump has claimed something along these lines. In fact, he's repeatedly said he wants a vaccine before election day. But is rushing out a vaccine possible–or safe? Joining Ira for another round of Fact Check Your Feed–election edition, this time–is Angela Rasmussen, associate professor in the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health in New York, New York. She also explains why New York City has not yet reached herd immunity, and fact checks Trump's claims that the Obama administration botched its H1N1 response.   And, the Science Friday Book Club is back! Imagine: A planet inhabited by parasitic life forms that turn human settlers into demonic figures. An aging woman who just wants to live in peace in a "dumb house" with no technological upgrades. A woman who starts to experience the presence of otherworldly visitors. A taxi driver who takes tourists from other planets on rides far above the New York City skyline. And, in the case of Darcie Little Badger's short story "Kelsey and the Burdened Breath," a young woman helps the last breaths of the dying, literally their souls or "shimmers," depart for the next adventure. That is, until she is asked to track down one that has committed the unthinkable: murder and cannibalism of other souls. All these are stories in the Nisi Shawl-edited collection, New Suns: Original Speculative Fiction By People Of Color, this fall's Science Friday Book Club pick. Over the next five weeks, we'll talk about stories from the book, starting with Little Badger's story about burdens–literal, metaphorical, and metaphysical. SciFri Book Club captain Christie Taylor kicks off the first in of a series of conversations about short stories from New Suns with Aisha Matthews, managing editor of The Journal of Science Fiction, and Darcie Little Badger, a Lipan Apache writer and author of the New Suns story "Kelsey and the Burdened Breath."   
Trump Tests Positive For Coronavirus, COVID-19 Fact Check, SciFri Book Club. Oct. 2, 2020, Part 1
2020-10-02 11:24:57
The news hit us overnight: President Trump, the First Lady, and at least one member of the president's staff tested positive for COVID-19. Just before 1 a.m. ET, the president tweeted that "Tonight, @FLOTUS and I tested positive for COVID-19. We will begin our quarantine and recovery process immediately. We will get through this TOGETHER!" Sean Conley, the White House physician, confirmed the positive COVID test and said that, "The President and First Lady are both well at this time, and they plan to remain at home within the White House during their convalescence." The president reportedly has mild symptoms of the virus. Joining Ira to talk about the medical ramifications and possibilities presented by the president's infection with COVID-19 is Angela Rasmussen, an associate research scientist in the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in New York, New York. Plus, this week, the U.S. had its first televised presidential debate of the election season. It was interesting, to say the least. During the debate, the President's COVID-19 response came under question, prompting President Trump to allege the U.S. is just weeks away from a COVID-19 vaccine. This isn't the first time Trump has claimed something along these lines. In fact, he's repeatedly said he wants a vaccine before election day. But is rushing out a vaccine possible–or safe? Joining Ira for another round of Fact Check Your Feed–election edition, this time–is Angela Rasmussen, associate professor in the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health in New York, New York. She also explains why New York City has not yet reached herd immunity, and fact checks Trump's claims that the Obama administration botched its H1N1 response.   And, the Science Friday Book Club is back! Imagine: A planet inhabited by parasitic life forms that turn human settlers into demonic figures. An aging woman who just wants to live in peace in a "dumb house" with no technological upgrades. A woman who starts to experience the presence of otherworldly visitors. A taxi driver who takes tourists from other planets on rides far above the New York City skyline. And, in the case of Darcie Little Badger's short story "Kelsey and the Burdened Breath," a young woman helps the last breaths of the dying, literally their souls or "shimmers," depart for the next adventure. That is, until she is asked to track down one that has committed the unthinkable: murder and cannibalism of other souls. All these are stories in the Nisi Shawl-edited collection, New Suns: Original Speculative Fiction By People Of Color, this fall's Science Friday Book Club pick. Over the next five weeks, we'll talk about stories from the book, starting with Little Badger's story about burdens–literal, metaphorical, and metaphysical. SciFri Book Club captain Christie Taylor kicks off the first in of a series of conversations about short stories from New Suns with Aisha Matthews, managing editor of The Journal of Science Fiction, and Darcie Little Badger, a Lipan Apache writer and author of the New Suns story "Kelsey and the Burdened Breath."   

47 minutes, 2 seconds

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