Popular Accidents News and Current Events

Popular Accidents News and Current Events, Accidents News Articles.
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New UTSA study shows wearable technology also contributes to distracted driving
A new study by Murtuza Jadliwala, assistant professor of computer science at The University of Texas at San Antonio, examines wearable technology and whether it affects drivers' concentration. Jadliwala and his collaborators discovered that while a driver texting with a wearable device can marginally reduce their level of distraction, it ultimately makes texting while driving just as dangerous as with an ordinary cell phone. (2018-04-23)

Motorcycle crashes cause 5 times as many deaths as car accidents, 6 times the health costs
Motorcycle accidents are costly in terms of lives and health care costs. Compared with car accidents, motorcycle accidents cause three times the injuries, six times the medical costs and 5 times the deaths, found new research in CMAJ. Despite better motor vehicle safety, injuries from motorcycle crashes have not improved. (2017-11-20)

Breaking up amino acids with radiation
A new experimental and theoretical study published in EPJ D has shown how the ions formed when electrons collide with one amino acid, glutamine, differ according to the energy of the colliding electrons. This has implications for improving radiotherapy for cancer and understanding the origin of life. (2020-02-05)

Study explores safety of rear-facing car seats in rear impact car crashes
Experts know that rear-facing car seats protect infants and toddlers in front and side impact crashes, but they are rarely discussed when it comes to rear-impact collisions. Because rear-impact crashes account for more than 25 percent of all accidents, researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center conducted a new study to explore the effectiveness of rear-facing car seats in this scenario. (2018-04-03)

Young cancer survivors have twice the risk of suicide
Survivors of cancer diagnosed before the age of 25 had a more than two-fold increased risk of suicide compared to their non-cancer peers. (2016-11-30)

Study shows texting while driving can be deadly
Sending text messages and similar behavior while driving can be deadly, according to research conducted in teens. The research will be presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies meeting on Saturday, May 2, in Baltimore. (2009-05-02)

New software can detect when people text and drive
Computer algorithms developed by engineering researchers at the University of Waterloo can accurately determine when drivers are texting or engaged in other distracting activities. (2017-09-08)

Drowsy driving in the ridesharing industry is a public safety risk
A position statement from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) concludes that fatigue and sleepiness are inherent safety risks in the ridesharing industry. (2018-04-16)

Going beyond 'human error'
A human factors study using Bayes' theorem and content analysis reveals underlying teamwork, organizational, and technological influences on severe US Naval aviation mishaps. (2018-04-30)

Maryland climate and health report identifies state's vulnerabilities to climate change
A new report by the University of Maryland School of Public Health and the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene details the impacts of climate change on the health of Marylanders now and in the future. Health impacts include increased risk of food and waterborne illnesses (caused by Salmonella and Campylobacter), hospitalization for heart attacks and asthma, and motor vehicle accidents. (2016-05-02)

Majority of mining-related injuries and illness in Illinois go unreported
Illnesses and injuries associated with working in Illinois mines are substantially underreported to the federal agency tasked with tracking these events, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine. (2018-03-09)

Should ethics or human intuition drive the moral judgments of driverless cars?
Driverless cars will encounter situations requiring moral assessment -- and new research suggests that people may not be happy with the decisions their cars make. Experiments designed to test people's reactions to a driving dilemma that endangers human life, revealed a high willingness for self-sacrifice, a consideration of the age of potential victims and swerving onto the sidewalk to save more lives -- intuitions that are sometimes at odds with ethically acceptable behavior or political guidelines. (2018-05-03)

Contribution of MOTs to road safety
The study 'Contribution of MOTs to road safety and the protection of citizens' health and the environment,' conducted by the Motor Vehicle Safety Institute 'Duque de Santomauro' of Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, reveals that the Ministry of Transport tests (MOTs) prevent 133 deaths, nearly 12,000 injuries of differing severity and at least 17,700 traffic accidents a year. (2018-07-10)

Stab injury of zebrafish unveils regenerative processes by neural stem cells in the brain
Waseda University researchers recently elucidated the regenerative processes by neural stem cells using a stab injury model in the optic tectum, a less studied area of the brain, of adult zebrafish. This study has brought them a step closer to shedding light on how an injured, human central nervous system (CNS) could be restored. (2018-03-06)

Many wildlife-vehicle collisions preventable
A new study from the University of Waterloo has found that Ontario could save millions by implementing simple measures to help prevent vehicle accidents involving wildlife. (2018-06-21)

UK needs to redesign health policies for men
While lots of attention has been given to women's increasing presence in the labor market, there has been less focus on male workers. By studying recent evidence through a 'male lens', this report calls on Government to commission more 'gendered' research to understand the different ways men and women engage with health services, arguing that work should be recognized as a health outcome due to the impact employment has on mental and physical health. (2018-11-18)

Risk of distracted driving predicted by age, gender, personality and driving frequency
The first study of how personal traits affect driver distraction finds that young men, extroverted or neurotic people, and people who drive more often are more likely to report being distracted during driving, while older women and those who feel they could control their distracted behavior are less likely to report distraction. The study also proposes future directions for interventions to reduce distracted driving. (2017-11-17)

Radiation causes blindness in wild animals in Chernobyl
This year marks 30 years since the Chernobyl nuclear accident. Vast amounts of radioactive particles spread over large areas in Europe. (2016-02-10)

Emergency CT for head trauma may be overused, study shows
Emergency patients are too often given head CT to check for skull fractures and brain hemorrhage, leading to unnecessary heath care costs and patient exposure to radiation, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2018 Annual Meeting, set for April 22-27 in Washington, DC. (2018-02-23)

Pulling an all-nighter impairs working memory in women
Over the last few decades, a wealth of evidence has accumulated to suggest that a lack of sleep is bad for mind and body. Working memory is important for keeping things in mind for briefer periods of time, which thereby facilitates reasoning and planning. A team of sleep scientists from Uppsala University now demonstrates that acute sleep loss impacts working memory differently in women and men. (2018-01-31)

The perils of texting while driving
US research reveals that four out of five college student drivers have used their cell phones to send or receive text messages while driving despite the majority recognizing that the activity represents a risk. (2013-10-11)

The 2008 recession associated with greater decline in mortality in Europe
In recent decades, Europe has experienced a downward trend in the annual number of deaths. Not only was this trend not arrested by the economic recession that started in 2008, in fact, the rate of decline increased during the recession years. This acceleration has been evidenced by the results of a study published in Nature Communications. (2019-02-08)

Back-to-school worries for parents? 1 in 3 very concerned bullying, cyberbullying
What parents are most worried about as their children prepare to head back to school. (2017-08-21)

Which kids will take longer to recover from brain injury?
A new biomarker may help predict which children will take longer to recover from a traumatic brain injury (TBI), according to a preliminary study published in the March 15, 2017, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2017-03-15)

"Save Your Face - Drink Sensibly" - Assault And Alcohol Major Causes Of Facial Injury
Assault and alcohol consumption are the two major factors responsible for serious facial injuries in young adults. One half of the facial injuries in the 15 - 25 year age group were sustained in assaults, usually in bars or streets, and were associated with alcohol consumption. From 1977 to 1987 the proportion of patients with facial injuries sustained in road accidents fell by 34 per cent, but violent crime has more than compensated for this decrease. (1998-01-30)

People keep driving even when sleepy
People continue to drive even when they know they are sleepy, suggests a large study published on bmj.com today. This has important implications for public safety, say the researchers. (2006-06-22)

Do large human crowds exhibit a collective behavior?
By observing the collective movement of thousands of Chicago Marathon runners queueing up to the starting line, researchers find that the motion of large crowds is fluid-like and mathematically predictable. (2019-01-03)

Fishing among worst jobs for health
People working in the fishing industry have among the poorest health of all workers in England and Wales, new research suggests. (2019-05-30)

Reaching the breaking point
To better understand why many elderly people are prone to break a bone in a fall (known as bone fragility fractures), perhaps doctors and researchers should look at the human skeleton in much the same way civil engineers analyze buildings and bridges, according to a new study from a University of Utah mechanical engineering professor. (2018-01-23)

Scientists find some human cancers to be 'evolutionary accidents'
New research, published in Biological Reviews and conducted by researchers from the University of Liverpool and Escola Superior de Ciências da Saúde (Brasília, Brazil) has found some type of cancers unique to humans may be a result of evolutionary accidents. (2018-04-17)

US childhood mortality rates have lagged behind other wealthy nations for the past 50 years
In a new study of childhood mortality rates between 1961 and 2010 in the United States and 19 economically similar countries, researchers report that while there's been overall improvement among all the countries, the U.S. has been slowest to improve. (2018-01-08)

The costs of transporting petroleum products by pipelines and rail
While the policy debate surrounding crude oil transportation costs has emphasized accidents and spills, a new study by Carnegie Mellon University and University of Pittsburgh researchers indicates the debate is overlooking a far more serious external cost -- air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. (2017-10-10)

Swapping cars for shared bicycles would avoid up to 73 deaths per year
A new study underscores the health and economic benefits of the 12 largest European bicycle-sharing systems. (2018-04-19)

Subclinical epileptic bursts in the brain may affect patients' driving
Epileptic discharges in the brain that are unaccompanied by obvious clinical signs are regarded as subclinical or interictal. A new study found that such bursts can prolong the reaction time and increase virtual accidents of patients taking a car driving computer test. (2016-04-07)

Increased risk of unnatural death to people with epilepsy found
A new study has shown that people diagnosed with epilepsy in England and Wales are at increased risk of dying from suicide and accidents. Though the risks of unnatural death for people with epilepsy are still low, they are significantly higher than the general population says Dr. Hayley Gorton from The University of Manchester. (2018-04-09)

Virtual reality training for 'safety-critical' jobs
New virtual reality training could help prevent accidents in 'safety-critical' industries like the NHS, aviation, the military and nuclear power. (2017-03-06)

Darn you, R2! When can we blame robots?
A recent study finds that people are likely to blame robots for workplace accidents, but only if they believe the robots are autonomous. (2019-10-17)

What can be done to prevent alcohol-impaired driving fatalaties?
A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) outlines a framework for preventing alcohol-impaired driving fatalities. (2018-01-17)

Spotting risky behavior crucial in cutting road accidents
A study published by a lecturer at the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Education -- Bilbao concludes that aggressive thoughts at the wheel lead to aggressive behavior, which in turn unleashes risky behavior associated with accident-related events. The study also shows that younger drivers experience more anger and express themselves more aggressively. By contrast, the differences between sexes are practically nonexistent. (2017-09-05)

Surge in bicycle injuries to riders over 45
The incidence of bicycle accidents has increased significantly in the US in recent years, with many serious injuries occurring among riders older than 45, according to a new study led by UCSF. (2015-09-01)

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