Popular Accumulation News and Current Events

Popular Accumulation News and Current Events, Accumulation News Articles.
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Methods and models
It's a well-known fact that the ocean is one of the biggest absorbers of the carbon dioxide emitted by way of human activity. What's less well known is how the ocean's processes for absorbing that carbon change over time, and how they might affect its ability to buffer climate change. (2019-06-19)

The invisible smallest particles matter for the air we breathe
Researchers of the University of Helsinki have resolved for the first time, how the ultrafine particles of atmosphere effect on the climate and health. (2021-02-23)

Mars is emerging from an ice age
Radar measurements of Mars' polar ice caps reveal that the mostly dry, dusty planet is emerging from an ice age, following multiple rounds of climate change. (2016-05-26)

How whip-like cell appendages promote bodily fluid flow
Researchers at Nagoya University revealed that a molecule called Daple is essential for the correct orientation and coordinated beating of cilia on the surface of cells lining ventricles in the brain. Without Daple, the cilia develop a random arrangement and cannot produce a uniform flow of CSF. This in turn leads to a build-up of fluid, which is associated with swelling of the head, known as hydrocephalus. (2017-08-18)

Discovery of molecular nets inside heart muscles hold promise for new treatment
Local researchers have discovered that a group of molecules, called chondroitin sulfate, normally found only in connective tissues such as the cartilage, accumulates and causes inflammation in the hearts of patients with heart failure. The discovery was made jointly by the National University Health System (NUHS), A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) and the National University of Singapore (NUS) Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, and is now published in Circulation, a journal from the American Heart Association. (2018-01-31)

Citrus fruits could help prevent obesity-related heart disease, liver disease, diabetes
Oranges and other citrus fruits are good for you -- they contain plenty of vitamins and substances, such as antioxidants, that can help keep you healthy. Now a group of researchers reports that these fruits also help prevent harmful effects of obesity in mice fed a Western-style, high-fat diet. The researchers are presenting their work today at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2016-08-21)

Plant cells survive but stop dividing upon DNA damage
The cell cycle is how a cell passes its DNA but ceases if the DNA is damaged, as otherwise it risks passing this damage to daughter cells. Scientists at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) report a new molecular mechanism that explains how this cessation occurs. The study shows that the transcription factor family MYB3R is normally degraded, but accumulates upon DNA damage to prevent cell cycle progression. (2017-10-06)

Novel film that that evaporates sweat six times faster and holds 15 times more moisture
Researchers from NUS Faculty of Engineering created a novel film that is very effective in evaporating sweat from our skin. Promising applications include shoe insoles and linings, as well as underarm pads for sweat absorption. (2021-01-04)

New system can identify drugs to target 'undruggable' enzymes critical in many diseases
A new drug discovery system allows scientists to specifically target members of an important family of enzymes, called phosphatases, which were previously considered mostly 'undruggable'. The study, published in Cell, demonstrated the capabilities of the new system by identifying a molecule that could successfully target a phosphatase to reduce the accumulation of Huntington's disease-associated proteins in the brains of mice. (2018-07-26)

Resistance training enhances recycling capacity in muscles
A new study at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland reports that autophagosome content is increased by resistance training in previously untrained young men, but this response may be blunted by aging. (2018-04-09)

New transgenic rat model may enable better understanding of amyloid buildup in cerebral blood vessels
In a report in The American Journal of Pathology investigators describe the generation of a successful novel transgenic rat model that accumulates amyloid specifically in brain blood vessels and strongly mimics many of the associated detrimental changes that are observed in humans - a condition known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), which is also commonly observed in Alzheimer disease. (2018-11-13)

Researchers shed light on why exercise slows progression of Parkinson's disease
While vigorous exercise on a treadmill has been shown to slow the progression of Parkinson's disease in patients, the molecular reasons behind it have remained a mystery. (2017-12-22)

Prostate cancer cells grow with malfunction of cholesterol control in cells
Advanced prostate cancer and high blood cholesterol have long been known to be connected, but it has been a chicken-or-egg problem. Now a team led by researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute have identified a cellular process that cancer cells hijack to hoard cholesterol and fuel their growth. Identifying this process could inform the development of better ways to control cholesterol accumulation in tumors, potentially leading to improved survival for prostate cancer patients. (2017-02-21)

Antarctic ice loss
Professor Jonathan Bamber at the University of Bristol and colleagues estimated the flux of ice from the ice sheet into the ocean from satellite data that cover 85 percent of Antarctica's coastline. They arrived at a best estimate of a loss of 132 billion tons of ice in 2006 from West Antarctica -- up from about 83 billion tons in 1996 -- and a loss of about 60 billion tons in 2006 from the Antarctic Peninsula. (2008-01-13)

Researchers describe new biology of Alzheimer's disease
In a new study, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) describe a unique model for the biology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) which may lead to an entirely novel approach for treating the disease. The findings appear in the journal Nature Neuroscience. (2017-11-20)

Radioactivity from oil and gas wastewater persists in Pennsylvania stream sediments
More than seven years after Pennsylvania officials requested that the disposal of radium-laden fracking wastewater into surface waters be restricted, a new Duke study finds that high levels of radioactivity persist in stream sediments at three disposal sites. Radioactivity at these sites is 650 times higher than at unaffected sites upstream. The contamination comes from conventional, or non-fracked, oil and gas wastewater, which, under current state regulations, can still be treated and discharged into streams. (2018-01-19)

Beneficial effects of no-till farming depend upon future climate change
By storing carbon in their fields through no-till farming practice, farmers can help countries meet targeted reductions in atmospheric carbon dioxide and reduce the harmful effects of global warming. However, researchers say, the amount of carbon stored in soils depends on how the climate changes and how much carbon dioxide is in the atmosphere. (2005-10-13)

In California, large-scale water cycles impact quakes a little
In California, seasonal changes in large-scale water cycles modestly influence small-scale quake activity, a new study reports. (2017-06-15)

Soot transported from elsewhere in world contributes little to melting of some Antarctic glaciers
Airborne soot produced by wildfires and fossil-fuel combustion and transported to the remote McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica contains levels of black carbon too low to contribute significantly to the melting of local glaciers, according to a new study by researchers supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF). (2018-03-16)

SwRI scientists discover evidence of ice age at martian north pole
Using radar data collected by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, a Southwest Research Institute-led team found evidence of an ice age recorded in the polar deposits of Mars. Ice ages on Mars are driven by processes similar to those responsible for ice ages on Earth, that is, long-term cyclical changes in the planet's orbit and tilt, which affect the amount of solar radiation it receives at each latitude. (2016-05-26)

NASA measures Tropical Cyclone Nora's flooding rains in Queensland
NASA used satellite data to calculate the heavy rainfall created by Tropical Cyclone Nora as it came ashore in northwestern Queensland on March 24, 2018. (2018-03-27)

Two compounds in coffee may team up to fight Parkinson's
Rutgers scientists have found a compound in coffee that may team up with caffeine to fight Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia -- two progressive and currently incurable diseases associated with brain degeneration. (2018-12-10)

Woodpeckers show signs of possible brain damage, but that might not be a bad thing
With each peck, woodpeckers absorb more than ten times the force it would take to give a human a concussion. But they seem fine. Researchers examined the brains of woodpeckers in museum collections and saw that the brains showed a build-up of a protein that's a sign of brain damage in humans. The woodpeckers might not have sustained brain damage themselves, though -- the researchers think that protein build-up could possibly be beneficial to the birds. (2018-02-02)

NASA's IMERG shows devastating rainfall over East Africa
Heavy seasonal rainfall has recently caused flooding in Kenya and NASA analyzed and estimated the total rainfall using data from a suite of satellites and gauges. (2018-05-04)

Lack of sleep may be linked to risk factor for Alzheimer's disease
Losing just one night of sleep led to an immediate increase in beta-amyloid, a protein in the brain associated with Alzheimer's disease, according to a small, new study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. (2018-04-13)

NASA analyzes Tropical Cyclone Eliakim's rainfall, wind shear now affecting storm
Tropical Cyclone Eliakim soaked the eastern coast of Madagascar as it moved in a southerly path. NASA analyzed that rainfall using data from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite. Another NASA satellite provided a current look at the storm that revealed wind shear was taking a toll on the storm. (2018-03-19)

NASA analyzes short-lived Bay of Bengal cyclone
NASA analyzed the rainfall generated by short-lived Tropical Cyclone 04B that formed and faded over a day in the Bay of Bengal. (2017-12-12)

Study finds biomarker that predicts who responds best to common diabetic complication
Researchers at St. Michael's Hospital have found a biomarker from fluid in the eye that predicts which patients will respond best to current treatments for diabetic macular edema, one of the most common complications of diabetes. (2018-03-08)

A role for mutated blood cells in heart disease?
A new study provides some of the first links between relatively common mutations in the blood cells of elderly humans and atherosclerosis. (2017-01-19)

NASA's IMERG reveals Hurricane Willa's rainfall
NASA uses satellite data to calculate the amount of rainfall generated from tropical cyclones, and used that capability for the Eastern Pacific Ocean's Hurricane Willa. (2018-10-26)

Could the biological clock be a key ally in the fight against inflammatory disease?
What if the symptoms and seriousness of certain inflammatory diseases were linked to time of day? Researchers from Inserm have been working on this hypothesis, after noting that the seriousness and mortality associated with fulminant hepatitis were dependent on the time at which the disease was induced. Their study, conducted on human cells and mice, shows that the anti-inflammatory action of a biological clock protein could prevent the onset of fulminant hepatitis, by alleviating symptoms and increasing survival rates. (2018-01-26)

HKBU study reveals human skin flakes lead to bad smell in air-conditioning systems
Skin squames are a source of food for the bacteria found in air-cooling units, which produce odours even in a dust-free air-conditioning system, a research by Hong Kong Baptist University scholars revealed. (2018-01-31)

Aggregated protein in nerve cells can cause ALS
Persons with the serious disorder ALS, can have a genetic mutation that causes the protein SOD1 to aggregate in motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Researchers at Umeå University in Sweden have discovered that, when injected into mice, the SOD1 aggregation spreads rapidly leading to ALS. The discovery has been described in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. (2016-05-04)

Breast cancer gene a potential target for childhood liver cancer treatment
Hepatoblastoma is a rare liver cancer that mainly affects infants and young children and is associated with mutations in the β-catenin gene. Researchers from Osaka University screened uncharacterized targets of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and confirmed that breast cancer gene GREB1 plays a major role in hepatoblastoma cell proliferation. By interfering with GREB1 protein production, tumor formation was inhibited in a mouse liver cancer model, suggesting this approach could be used to develop a targeted hepatoblastoma therapy. (2019-09-03)

Unveiling the biology behind nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
EPFL scientists have discovered a new biological mechanism behind nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. (2017-01-17)

NASA adds up record Australia rainfall
Over the week of May 15, extreme rainfall drenched northeastern Australia and NASA data provided a look at the record totals. (2017-05-22)

Noninvasive retinal imaging may improve early detection of Alzheimer's disease
In this issue of JCI Insight, researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center adapted a noninvasive retinal imaging approach to characterize amyloid-β deposition, the pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, in the retinas of patients and healthy controls. This imaging enabled detection and quantification of amyloid-β, revealing increased deposits in Alzheimer's patients compared to controls. These results demonstrate the feasibility of this approach as a tool for earlier Alzheimer's diagnosis and intervention. (2017-08-17)

Insights into familial middle-age dementia suggest new avenues for treatment
Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a common cause of hereditary dementia, but the molecular events driving the disease are poorly understood. Researchers centered at Tokyo Medical and Dental University(TMDU) developed a mouse model to study a form of FTLD linked to mutations in the PGRN gene (FTLD-TDP). The team discovered that tau protein phosphorylation is a key early event in the pathology of FTLD-TDP, and identified key players in tau phosphorylation that represent potential therapeutic targets. (2018-02-23)

Researchers find that lipid accumulation in the brain may be an early sign of Parkinson's disease
A collaborative team of researchers at McLean Hospital and Oxford University has found that elevated levels of certain types of lipids (fat molecules) in the brain may be an early sign of Parkinson's disease (PD). This finding could have significant implications for identifying patients who may be at risk for developing PD and for the early treatment of the disease. (2018-04-29)

When push comes to shove: Airway cells propel liver cancer spread to lungs
Kanazawa University-led Japanese researchers identified a crucial role for air sac-based scavenger blood cells, alveolar macrophages (AMs), in driving hepatocellular cancer metastasis in the lungs. AMs were found to be recruited by interstitial macrophages (IMs) through interactions between the IM-expressed signaling molecule CCL2 and its AM-expressed receptor. AMs then secrete leukotriene B4, which promotes tumor cell growth. This is the first evidence for the distinct roles of AMs and IMs in liver cell lung metastasis. (2018-06-01)

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