Popular Achilles Tendon News and Current Events

Popular Achilles Tendon News and Current Events, Achilles Tendon News Articles.
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Novel microplate 3D bioprinting platform for muscle & tendon tissue engineering
New research describes the development of a novel screening platform with automated production of 3D muscle- and tendon-like tissues using 3D bioprinting. (2018-06-13)

Gummy-like robots that could help prevent disease
EPFL scientists have developed microscopic, hydrogel-based muscles that can manipulate and mechanically stimulate biological tissue. These soft, biocompatible robots could be used for targeted therapy and to help diagnose and prevent disease. (2019-02-08)

Ibuprofen better choice over oral morphine for pain relief in children after minor surgery
Widely available ibuprofen is a better choice for pain relief in children who have undergone minor orthopedic outpatient surgery, as it has fewer adverse effects compared with oral morphine, according to results from a clinical trial published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2017-10-10)

Imaging plays key role in evaluating injuries at Olympics
The Olympic Games give elite athletes a chance at athletic triumph, but also carry a risk of injury. When injuries occur, it is critical that they be evaluated quickly. Onsite imaging services play an important role in the management of Olympic athletes with sports-related injuries and disorders, according to a new study. (2018-02-26)

Study unlocks full potential of 'supermaterial' graphene
New research reveals why the 'supermaterial' graphene has not transformed electronics as promised, and shows how to double its performance and finally harness its extraordinary potential. (2018-11-29)

Military surgeons report 'alarming frequency' of bench press injuries
A new study has found that serious chest muscle injuries are occurring with 'alarming frequency' among deployed service members who lift weights. The injuries -- tears of the pectoralis major tendon -- occurred while doing bench press weight training. The injuries then required surgical repair and six months recovery. (2018-03-22)

Major trial shows breast cancer drug can hit prostate cancer Achilles heel
A drug already licensed for the treatment of breast and ovarian cancers is more effective than targeted hormone therapy at keeping cancer in check in some men with advanced prostate cancer, a major clinical trial reports. Olaparib, a pill lacking the side effects of chemotherapy, can target an Achilles heel in prostate cancers with a weakness in their ability to repair damaged DNA. (2020-04-28)

Aging has distinct and opposite effects on tendon in males and females
New research from the University of Liverpool, published in the journal Scientific Reports, has identified that in tendon aging has distinct and opposite effects on the genes expressed in males and females. (2017-10-31)

Sports rehabilitation and injury prevention
From the treatment table to the pitch, (2010-04-01)

Scientists find missing clue to how HIV hacks cells to propagate itself
Computer modeling has helped a team of scientists, including several scholars from the University of Chicago, to decode previously unknown details about the 'budding' process by which HIV forces cells to spread the virus to other cells. The findings, published Nov. 7 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may offer a new avenue for drugs to combat the virus. (2017-11-08)

Novel approach to track HIV infection
Scientists used a novel live-cell fluorescent imaging system that allowed them for the first time to identify individual viral particles associated with HIV infection. (2017-08-18)

New medication gives mice bigger muscles
Researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, have studied a new group of medicinal products which increase the muscle- and bone mass of mice over a few weeks. This offers hope to the elderly and people suffering from weak muscles and bones due to illness. (2019-03-27)

Could this be malaria's Achilles heel?
Portuguese researchers at Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) Lisboa have identified a defence mechanism by which the malaria parasite can survive inside its host's liver cells. (2017-11-06)

Future wearable device could tell how we power human movement
For athletes and weekend warriors alike, returning from a tendon injury too soon often ensures a trip right back to physical therapy. However, a new technology developed by University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers could one day help tell whether your tendons are ready for action. (2018-04-24)

First trial of dapivirine ring with both ARV and contraceptive finds no safety concerns
In the first clinical study of a vaginal ring that releases the antiretroviral drug dapivirine as well as a contraceptive hormone, there were no safety concerns and the ring was well-tolerated. The ring is designed to provide protection against both HIV infection and unintended pregnancy for 90 days at a time. Given the encouraging results, researchers have already launched a second Phase I trial of the dual-purpose ring. (2018-10-24)

A new tactic for starving tumors
Scientists have found a metabolic particularity in tumor cells that are low on oxygen. The discovery might point to new drugs to target the most difficult-to-treat spots within a tumor. (2018-06-25)

Harnessing plant hormones for food security in Africa
Striga is a parasitic plant that threatens the food supply of 300 million people in sub-Saharan Africa. Scientists have found that they can take advantage of Striga's Achilles' Heel: if it can't find a host plant, it dies. The scientists have developed a technique that has potential to reduce the impact of Striga by more than half, helping to safeguard food supplies and farmers' livelihoods. (2019-03-28)

Chimera viruses can help the fight against lymphomas
Researchers from Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) Lisboa have created a chimera virus that allows the study of molecules to treat cancers caused by human herpes virus infection in mice models of disease. (2017-09-14)

Mechanism vital to keeping blood stem cells functional uncovered
Hematopoietic stem cells, that form mature blood cells, require a very precise amount of protein to function -- and defective regulation of protein production is common in certain types of aggressive human blood cancers. Now, a research team at Lund University in Sweden has uncovered a completely new mechanism that controls how proteins are produced to direct stem cell function. (2018-04-06)

Studies reveal characteristics of bone and tendon injuries incurred by Olympic athletes
Female athletes participating in the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro were more likely to experience bone stress injuries in their lower extremities while competing in track and field compared to other events. In addition, tendon abnormalities similarly were most common in track and field athletes, however they most frequently involved the shoulder, Achilles and patellar tendons. (2017-10-30)

Lateral extra-articular tenodesis reduces hamstring autograft
The addition of lateral extra-articular tenodesis to a hamstring autograft in knee surgery in young active patients significantly reduces graft failure and persistent anterolateral rotatory laxity at two years post operatively. The research, presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Orthopedic Sports Medicine Society, received the O'Donoghue Sports Injury Award. (2019-07-12)

Public's poor knowledge of anatomy may hamper healthcare
Healthcare is being hampered because of the public's poor basic knowledge of anatomy. Middle-aged non-graduates scored better than young graduates in an anatomical quiz given to the public. The only organ which 100 percent of people answered correctly was the brain followed by the biceps muscle and the cornea. The organs which the public knew least about were the adrenal glands which less than 15 percent of people could identify. (2017-11-07)

AAOS 2017: Why some ACL surgeries fail
Typically, orthopaedic surgeons can get athletes back to their sport with ACL reconstruction surgery. But what happens when the reconstruction surgery isn't successful? (2017-03-22)

Even as hospitals cut risky antibiotic use in-house, patients often go home with them
Even as hospitals try to cut back on prescribing powerful but risky antibiotics called fluoroquinolones, a new study shows that many patients still head home with prescriptions for the drugs -- increasing their risk of everything from 'superbug' infections to torn tendons. In fact, the hospitals that are actively trying to reduce inpatient fluoroquinolone use were twice as likely to discharge patients with a new prescription for one of them. (2019-02-13)

Does autograft choice in ACL reconstruction affect recurrent ACL revision rates
Young athletes who have anterior cruciate ligament surgery are more likely to need an additional surgery if they received a hamstring graft compared to a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft, according to research presented today at the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting. The research was conducted by group of clinicians led by Dr. Christopher C. Kaeding of Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. (2019-07-12)

How an herbivore hijacks a nutrient uptake strategy of its host plant
Maize plants release secondary metabolites into the soil that bind to iron and thereby facilitate its uptake by the plant. The Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera), the economically most important maize pest worldwide, is attracted by these complexes, extracts the bound iron from the maize plant and uses it for its own nutrition. With these insights, researchers provide a new explanation for the extraordinary success of the Western corn rootworm as a global maize pest. (2018-08-16)

Rotator cuff tears: Are they all in the family?
People with relatives who have experienced rotator cuff tears are at increased risk of similar tendon tears themselves, according to a study published in the May 2009 issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. (2009-05-01)

Study links shoulder ultrasound brightness with type 2 diabetes
Henry Ford Hospital researchers may have unknowingly happened on a new predictor of type 2 diabetes as part of a new ultrasound shoulder study. The predictor may be an ultrasound of the deltoid muscle, which researchers found appears much brighter on diabetic patients than on obese nondiabetic patients. (2018-11-19)

How do muscle and tendon connections last a lifetime?
Muscles are connected to tendons to power animal movements such as running, swimming or flying. During development, these muscle-tendon attachments must be established such that they resist high mechanical forces for the entire life of the animal. An international research team from Marseille (France), M√ľnster and Munich (both Germany) shows now in fruit flies how a protein controls mechanical stress on muscle-tendon connections. The study has been published in the journal PLOS Biology. (2019-04-04)

Researchers develop virus live stream to study virus infection
Researchers from the Hubrecht Institute and Utrecht University developed an advanced technique that makes it possible to monitor a virus infection live. The researchers from the groups of Tanenbaum and Van Kuppeveld expect that the technique can be used to study a wide variety of viruses, including SARS-CoV-2. The technique named VIRIM is very valuable for gaining insights in virus infection in the human body, which can lead to more targeted treatments. (2020-11-13)

Scientists root out the 'bad seeds' of liver cancer
Researchers have found the 'bad seeds' of liver cancer and believe they could one day reprogram them to remain responsive to cancer treatment, a new USC study has found. The key to disrupting chemo-resistant stem cells that become liver tumors from multiplying is to target the stem cell marker NANOG, said Keigo Machida, senior author. (2016-01-06)

Eliminating infamous security threats
Speculative memory side-channel attacks like Meltdown and Spectre are security vulnerabilities in computers. No efficient solutions have been found. Existing solutions only address specific security threats without solving the underlying issue. Now, researchers from University of Murcia, Uppsala University and NTNU have come up with a more appealing solution, which will be presented at the International Symposium on Computer Architecture (ISCA) at the end of June. (2019-06-12)

Finding the 'ghost particles' might be more challenging than what we thought
Results from the NEOS experiment on sterile neutrinos differ partly from the theoretical expectations. (2017-03-21)

Resistance training prevents age-related tendon damage
A study published online in The FASEB Journal suggests that resistance training may prevent age-related tendon problems, such as ruptures and tendinopathies. (2017-10-04)

Surgical technique improves sensation, control of prosthetic limb
An MIT study describes first human implementation of a surgical technique that improves a patient's sensation and control of a prosthetic limb. (2018-05-30)

First comprehensive paper on statins' adverse effects released
A paper co-authored by Beatrice Golomb, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of medicine at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and director of UC San Diego's Statin Study group cites nearly 900 studies on the adverse effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, a class of drugs widely used to treat high cholesterol. (2009-01-26)

Why is calcific tendinitis so painful?
Calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, typically characterized by calcium deposits on the rotator cuff, is an extremely painful condition that can severely impair movement and life quality. A new study appearing in today's issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, found a significant increase in blood vessel and pain receptor growth among patients with this condition. (2016-02-03)

The fine print
University of Utah biomedical engineering assistant professor Robby Bowles and his team have developed a method to 3D print cells to produce human tissue such as ligaments and tendons to greatly improve a patient's recovery. A person with a badly damaged ligament, tendon, or ruptured disc could simply have new replacement tissue printed and ultimately implanted in the damaged area. (2018-10-10)

Protective mediators can help heal injured tendon cells by attacking inflammation
Tendon tears, both to the rotator cuff and Achilles heel, are common injuries, especially in aged individuals. Painful and disabling, they can adversely impact quality of life. New approaches are required to help patients suffering from chronic tendon injuries. A novel study in The American Journal of Pathology, published by Elsevier, identified mediators that promote resolution of inflammation as potential new therapeutics to push chronically injured tendons down an inflammation-resolving pathway. (2019-10-10)

3-D printed microfibers could provide structure for artificially grown body parts
Much as a frame provides structural support for a house and the chassis provides strength and shape for a car, a team of Penn State engineers believe they have a way to create the structural framework for growing living tissue using an off-the-shelf 3-D printer. (2017-12-12)

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