Popular Acknowledged News and Current Events

Popular Acknowledged News and Current Events, Acknowledged News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 7 | 265 Results
Leading cancer research organizations to host international cancer immunotherapy conference
The Cancer Research Institute, the Association for Cancer Immunotherapy, the European Academy of Tumor Immunology, and the American Association for Cancer Research will join forces to sponsor the first International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference at the Sheraton New York Times Square Hotel in New York, Sept. 16-19, 2015. (2015-08-03)

World's largest volcanic range may lurk beneath Antarctic ice
West Antarctica's vast ice sheet conceals what may be the largest volcanic region on earth, research has revealed. (2017-08-14)

Performance appraisal success depends on frequent feedback and good standard setting
Appraisal of employees often gets a bad press, but recent research suggests if it involves frequent feedback between the formal appraisal and good prior planning and communication of standards then it can be successful and appreciated by employees. (2017-11-17)

A bioengineered tattoo monitors blood calcium levels
Scientists have created a biomedical tattoo that becomes visible on the skin of mice in response to elevated levels of calcium in the blood. (2018-04-18)

Important to maintain a diversity of habitats in the sea
Researchers from University of Gothenburg and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) show that both species diversity and habitat diversity are critical to understand the functioning of ecosystems. (2017-02-14)

New model makes us wiser on cocktail effects
Danish researchers have addressed an international environmental problem by developing a model that can predict how certain chemicals amplify the effects of pesticides and other chemical compounds. Pesticide expert hopes that it will make environmental legislation easier. (2017-12-13)

Is a cup of tea really the answer to everything -- even anthrax?
A cup of black tea could be the next line of defense in the threat of bio-terrorism according to new international research. A new study by an international team of researchers from Cardiff University and University of Maryland has revealed how the humble cup of tea could well be an antidote to Bacillus anthracis -- more commonly know as anthrax. (2008-03-12)

Large numbers of students skipping breakfast
Despite widespread availability of morning meal programs, a large number of Canadian students are still skipping breakfast, according to a study from the University of Waterloo. (2018-03-14)

Study uncovers the intricacies of the pursuit of higher self-control
Self-control is a central human capacity associated with a wide range of personal and societal advantages. In view of its benefits, increasing self-control among children and adults has been advocated as a remedy to many of society's ailments, from childhood obesity to adulthood criminal behavior. Although widely considered highly beneficial, a recent review uncovers some disadvantages to high self-control. (2018-03-26)

Small materials poised for big impact in construction
Bricks, blocks, and steel I-beams -- step aside. A new genre of construction materials, made from stuff barely 1/50,000th the width of a human hair, is about to debut in the building of homes, offices, bridges, and other structures. And a new report is highlighting both the potential benefits of these nanomaterials in improving construction materials and the need for guidelines to regulate their use and disposal. The report appears in the monthly journal ACS Nano. (2010-11-03)

Mesenchymal stem cell therapy: Holding promise for feline inflammatory diseases
Stem cell therapy is acknowledged as having great potential for the treatment of a variety of diseases in both people and animals. The use of bone marrow-derived stem cells is well established in the treatment of human cancer patients, and veterinary applications for bone marrow- and adipose-derived stem cells are being evaluated (2018-03-13)

Ants fight plant diseases
New research from Aarhus University shows that ants inhibit at least 14 different plant diseases. The small insects secrete antibiotics from glands in the body. On their legs and body, they also host colonies of bacteria that secrete antibiotics. It is probably these substances that inhibit a number of different diseases and researchers now hope to find biological pesticides that may conquer resistant plant diseases. (2019-10-17)

When oil and water mix
Hydraulic fracturing of organic-rich shales has become a major industry. The commonly used term for this extraction of hydrocarbons -- fracking -- is especially intriguing. Not only does it convey the process of breaking apart rocks, but the dividing of public opinion. Fracking is simultaneously hyped as a boon to the economy and a disaster to the environment. (2018-07-03)

Diverse metals mix it up in novel nanoparticles
Researchers have learned to combine up to eight different metals in a single tiny, uniformly mixed nanoparticle. (2018-04-04)

Mothers should be cautious when discussing weight with daughters
How should a concerned mother discuss issues of diet and weight with her daughter? Very carefully, according to Erin Hillard, a developmental psychology doctoral student at the University of Notre Dame. (2015-12-22)

Hospice caregivers should be screened early to prevent depression, anxiety
A study at the University of Missouri School of Medicine found that nearly one-quarter of caregivers were moderately or severely depressed and nearly one-third had moderate or severe anxiety. (2017-02-08)

Killing a name of an extinct sea cow species
In a recent publication of the open access journal Zoosystematics and Evolution, Manja Voss from the Museum fuer Naturkunde Berlin deals with a new hypothesis of two distinct species that lived about 30 Millions of years ago in Central Europe and draws conclusions on the invalidity of the common species name Halitherium schinzii in favor of a new nominal framework for fossil sea cows. (2014-04-02)

Patient engagement as a new blockbuster drug, not quite yet, study finds
A team of researchers from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and the Berkeley School of Public Health at UC Berkeley recently conducted a study designed to better understand how patient engagement and activation (PAE) practices are being integrated into clinical practice. What they found was a great deal of positive sentiment about PAE among the healthcare professionals surveyed, but much less understanding and implementation of PAE tools and approaches. (2018-11-14)

New model for bimolecular reactions in nanoreactors
Theoretical physicists have devised a mathematical model of two different molecules reacting within so called nanoreactors that act as catalysts. They gained surprising new insights as to what factors promote reactions and how to control and select them. The model is relevant for a wide range of research fields, from biophysics to energy materials. (2017-08-04)

Children's sleep difficulties: Reports differ from children to parents
Elementary school-aged children report that they have sleep difficulties more often than their parents report think they do. A sample of 300 pairs of eight-year-old twins was studied to examine the genetic and environmental influences on sleep. The research suggests several explanations for the discrepancy between child and parent reported sleep difficulties in children. Overall, the findings reflect that both genetic and environmental influences are factors in a range of sleep problems. (2006-11-14)

Obesity association reacts to discrimination regarding surgery basis of body mass index
A UK obesity charity has objected strongly to the decision by health bodies in the UK restricting access to surgery on the basis of body mass index, calling it discriminatory. (2017-11-14)

Exercise can improve non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease
Exercise has potential to improve non-motor as well as motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), including cognitive function, report investigators in a review published in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease. (2019-03-04)

Study highlights value of acknowledging adolescents' perspectives
Across very different cultures -- Ghana and the United States -- when parents acknowledge the perspectives of their adolescent children and encourage them to express themselves, the youths have a stronger sense of self-worth, intrinsic motivation, and engagement, and also have less depression. Yet having the latitude to make decisions appears to function differently in the two cultures, with positive outcomes for youths in the United States but not in Ghana. (2017-10-24)

Scale is a key ingredient when tracking biodiversity, researchers say
To fully understand biodiversity and how it is changing, you need to look near, far, and in-between, according to a new study. Researchers at Yale University studied 50 years of data about nesting birds in North America and tracked biodiversity changes on a local, regional, and continental scale. They found significant differences in how much change had occurred, based upon how wide a geographic net they cast. (2018-07-02)

Are healthcare providers 'second victims' of medical errors?
Four women with family members who died as a result of preventable medical error penned an editorial for The BMJ urging abandonment of the term 'second victims' to describe healthcare providers who commit errors. (2019-04-02)

Hope to discover sure signs of life on Mars? New research says look for the element vanadium
A new paper in the journal Astrobiology suggests NASA and others hunting for proof of Martian biology in the form of 'microfossils' could use the element vanadium in combination with Raman spectroscopy to confirm traces of extraterrestrial life. (2017-09-21)

Global calcium consumption appears low, especially in Asia
A new systematic review of global daily calcium consumption suggests substantial regional differences -- it's lowest in East Asia and highest in Northern Europe. (2017-10-18)

Which piece resembles your color perception for #theDress image?
A novel algorithm to simulate the color appearance of objects under chromatic illuminants has been proposed by Ichiro Kuriki of Tohoku University. (2018-03-22)

Minimizing obesity's impact on ovarian cancer survival
A new study showed that when actual body weight was used in chemo dosing for epithelial ovarian cancer, the overall survival is 40 months for non-obese patients and 47 months for obese patients, not a significant difference. Similar outcomes are seen in obese and non-obese cancer survivors being monitored for recurrence of their ovarian cancer, the study authors said. Earlier studies found obesity as a negative indicator. (2008-12-29)

97% of footballers in the Spanish League unaware of banned substances
A study conducted by researchers from the University of Granada has also found that 95% of footballers do not even know what this agency is for. The researchers analysed a sample of 1,324 footballers from 88 different teams, including 304 players from the Professional Football League. (2019-09-06)

Music develops the spoken language of the hearing-impaired
Finnish researchers have compiled guidelines for international use for utilising music to support the development of spoken language. The guidelines are suitable for the parents of children with hearing impairments, early childhood education providers, teachers, speech therapists and other rehabilitators of children with hearing disabilities, as well as the hearing-impaired themselves. (2019-06-27)

New research reveals soil microbes play a key role in plant disease resistance
Scientists have discovered that soil microbes can make plants more resistant to an aggressive disease -- opening new possibilities for sustainable food production. (2019-09-25)

Women TEDx speakers receive more polarized comments than men
BYU researchers found that though most comments on TEDx and TED-Ed videos are neutral, women receive more of both positive and negative comments than men. (2018-06-26)

Mucosal healing: An objective measure of disease activity?
The absence of inflammatory and ulcerative lesions in all segments of the colon, also known as mucosal healing, should be the end goal in treating patients with ulcerative colitis according to an editorial in the journal Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. (2017-11-21)

Successful lab tests on a potential vaccine for heroin addiction
Scientists are reporting development and successful initial laboratory tests on the key ingredient for a much-needed vaccine to help individuals addicted to heroin abstain from the illicit drug. Their study appears in ACS' Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. (2011-07-20)

Big Cat Expert Applauds Listing Of Jaguar As Endangered In U.S.
Big Cat expert, Dr. Alan Rabinowitz of the Wildlife Conservation Society, applauds last week's decision to list the jaguar as an endangered species on U.S. soil. Rabinowitz recently released a report on the status of wild jaguars in the southwest. (1997-07-22)

On the edge of graphene
Researchers at the National Physical Laboratory have discovered that the conductivity at the edges of graphene devices is different to that of the central material. (2014-08-15)

Sharing parenting leads to healthier young, beetle study finds
Animals who share the burden of raising young tend to have healthier offspring than animals who do so alone (2018-08-01)

COVID-19: Are we handling this the right way?
COVID-19: Herd Immunity needs to be considered. (2020-06-08)

Study highlights 'emotional labor' of college student-athletes
A recent study from North Carolina State University highlights the 'emotional labor' required of collegiate student-athletes, which can leave student-athletes feeling powerless, frustrated and nervous. The study calls on universities to better prepare their student-athletes with communication skills they can use to address the challenges of emotional labor. (2016-06-01)

Page 1 of 7 | 265 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.