Popular Acs Member News and Current Events

Popular Acs Member News and Current Events, Acs Member News Articles.
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Micromotors deliver oral vaccines
Vaccines have saved millions of lives, but nobody likes getting a shot. That's why scientists are trying to develop oral vaccines for infectious diseases. But to be effective, the vaccine must survive digestion and reach immune cells within the intestinal wall. Now, researchers reporting in the ACS journal Nano Letters have developed oral vaccines powered by micromotors that target the mucus layer of the intestine. (2019-02-06)

Biosensor could help diagnose illnesses directly in serum
In this age of fast fashion and fast food, people want things immediately. The same holds true when they get sick and want to know what's wrong. But performing rapid, accurate diagnostics on a serum sample without complex and time-consuming manipulations is a tall order. Now, a team reports in ACS Sensors that they have developed a biosensor that overcomes these issues. (2017-08-30)

These lithium-ion batteries can't catch fire because they harden on impact
Lithium-ion batteries used in consumer electronics are notorious for bursting into flame when damaged. These incidents occasionally have grave consequences, ranging from burns to house fires to the crash of an airplane. Inspired by the weird behavior of some liquids that solidify on impact, researchers have developed a practical and inexpensive method to prevent these fires. They will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2018-08-22)

The science behind the fizz: How the bubbles make the beverage
From popping a bottle of champagne for a celebration to cracking open a soda while watching the Super Bowl, everyone is familiar with fizz. But little is known about the chemistry behind the bubbles. Now, one group sheds some light on how carbonation can affect the creaminess and smoothness of beverages, as reported in ACS' The Journal of Physical Chemistry B. (2018-01-31)

Some kitchen cabinets can emit potentially harmful compounds
Probably the last place anyone would want to find airborne polychlorinated biphenyl compounds (PCBs) is in the kitchen, yet that's exactly where scientists detected their presence, according to a new report in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology. They say that the PCBs, which are widely considered carcinogenic, are unwanted byproducts of sealant breakdown in modern kitchen cabinetry. (2018-04-18)

Better, bolder printing with silicon nanostructures
From textbooks to artwork to newspapers, printed items are a part of our everyday life. But the ink used in today's printers are limited in colors and resolution. Now in a new study in ACS' journal Nano Letters, scientists have found a way to expand the printable color spectrum with a novel nanostructure system. (2017-11-08)

'Stressed out' cocoa trees could produce more flavorful chocolate 
Most people agree that chocolate tastes great, but is there a way to make it taste even better? Perhaps, according to scientists who looked at different conditions that can put a strain on cocoa trees. Reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, they say that although the agricultural method used to grow cocoa trees doesn't matter that much, the specific weather conditions do.  (2017-12-06)

Paving the way for hydrogen fuel cells
The hype around hydrogen fuel cells has died down, but scientists have continued to pursue new technologies that could enable such devices to gain a firmer foothold. Now one team has developed an electrocatalyst to replace the currently dominant, but expensive, one of choice -- platinum -- that could help boost the fledgling fuel-cell industry. Their report appears in the journal ACS Nano. (2017-06-28)

After cooking, biofortified corn and eggs retain nutrient needed to prevent blindness
Fortified and biofortified foods are at the forefront of efforts to combat vitamin A deficiency worldwide. But little is known about what influence processing may have on the retention of vitamin A precursors in these foods. Now in a study appearing in ACS Omega, scientists report that a high percentage of these healthful substances -- in some cases, almost all -- can survive cooking, depending on the preparation method.  (2017-11-15)

How depression can muddle thinking
Depression is associated with sadness, fatigue and a lack of motivation. But people with depression can also have trouble processing information and solving problems. Now scientists studying a rat model for depression are identifying on a molecular level how the condition could affect thinking. The findings, published in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience, could lead to the development of new depression treatments that would address associated cognitive problems. (2017-02-15)

Verifying that sorghum is a new safe grain for people with celiac disease
Strong new biochemical evidence exists showing that the cereal grain sorghum is a safe food for people with celiac disease, who must avoid wheat and certain other grains, scientists are reporting. Their study, which includes molecular evidence that sorghum lacks the proteins toxic to people with celiac disease, appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. (2013-04-03)

How a protein could become the next big sweetener
High-fructose corn syrup and sugar are on the outs with calorie-wary consumers. As a result, low- and no-calorie alternatives have become popular, and soon, there could be another option that tastes more sugar-like than other substitutes. Scientists report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry a step toward commercial production of a fruit protein called brazzein that is far sweeter than sugar -- and has fewer calories. (2016-08-17)

Fifty years after the Cuyahoga conflagration
On June 22, 1969, the Cuyahoga River, which flows through Cleveland, Ohio, caught fire. Although firefighters extinguished the blaze within 30 minutes, the shocking event helped galvanize the US environmental movement. Fifty years later, the river is much healthier but still recuperating from a legacy of pollution, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (2019-06-19)

American Cancer Society outlines blueprint for cancer control in the 21st century
The American Cancer Society is outlining its vision for cancer control in the decades ahead in a series of articles that forms the basis of a national cancer control plan. (2018-07-10)

Young American Latinos report the most discrimination
Although the United States has seen a dramatic increase in Mexican and Latin American immigrants since 1970, a recent study by Penn State researchers is one of the few where perceived discrimination is examined in this population. The study found that undocumented Latino immigrants are not the most likely group to report discrimination. (2017-06-26)

Plastic teabags release microscopic particles into tea
Many people are trying to reduce their plastic use, but some tea manufacturers are moving in the opposite direction: replacing traditional paper teabags with plastic ones. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have discovered that a soothing cup of the brewed beverage may come with a dose of micro- and nano-sized plastics shed from the bags. Possible health effects of ingesting these particles are currently unknown, the researchers say. (2019-09-25)

From landfill to lipstick: Grape waste as a cosmetic and food ingredient
The world drinks a lot of wine, and that means a lot of grapes are consumed. But not every part of the grape ends up in the bottle. Seeds, stalks and skins end up in landfills. Now, researchers say they have found useful commercial applications, such as prolonging the shelf life of fatty foods, for these wine leftovers. The researchers present their work at the 255th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2018-03-19)

Citrus fruits could help prevent obesity-related heart disease, liver disease, diabetes
Oranges and other citrus fruits are good for you -- they contain plenty of vitamins and substances, such as antioxidants, that can help keep you healthy. Now a group of researchers reports that these fruits also help prevent harmful effects of obesity in mice fed a Western-style, high-fat diet. The researchers are presenting their work today at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2016-08-21)

Searching beyond graphene for new wonder materials
Graphene, the two-dimensional, ultra lightweight and super-strong carbon film, has been hailed as a wonder material since its discovery in 2004. Now researchers are going beyond graphene and preparing other 2-D films with extraordinary properties for applications in wearable electronics, sensors and energy storage. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, surveys this expanding landscape. (2017-05-31)

This is your brain on alcohol (video)
It's almost time to ring in 2017. And since most New Year's celebrations include alcohol, Reactions' latest episode explains the chemistry behind its effects -- drunkenness, frequent bathroom breaks and occasionally poor decision-making. Find out how it all comes down to ethanol (which, like all things, should be enjoyed in moderation) here: https://youtu.be/1xVqwYxe4Gw. (2016-12-27)

Light touch keeps a grip on delicate nanoparticles
Using a refined technique for trapping and manipulating nanoparticles, NIST researchers have extended the trapped particles' useful life more than tenfold. This new approach, which one researcher likens to (2012-05-03)

First-ever US experiments at new X-ray facility may lead to better explosive modeling
For the first time in the US, time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (TRSAXS) is used to observe ultra-fast carbon clustering and graphite and nanodiamond production in the insensitive explosive Plastic Bonded Explosive (PBX) 9502, potentially leading to better computer models of explosive performance. (2017-11-06)

Swansea scientists discover greener way of making plastics
A new catalyst that allows for the conversion of the green house gas carbon dioxide to an industrial precursor for many plastics has been developed by scientists in the Energy Safety Research Institute at Swansea University as an alternative to using petroleum raw materials. (2018-04-11)

Automated electric taxis could help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and costs
Word on the street is that self-driving cars are the next big thing. But current vehicles emit a lot of greenhouse gases, and self-driving cars will initially come with a steep purchase price. Now, one group reports in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology, that, with a mathematical model, they've shown that self-driving, electric taxis could reduce emissions, energy use and overall costs. (2018-03-28)

A brewer's tale of proteins and beer
The transformation of barley grains into beer is an old story, typically starring water, yeast and hops. Now, in a report in the Journal of Proteome Research, scientists are highlighting another character in this tale: proteins. The results could someday lead to a better, tastier brew. (2018-03-14)

Small materials poised for big impact in construction
Bricks, blocks, and steel I-beams -- step aside. A new genre of construction materials, made from stuff barely 1/50,000th the width of a human hair, is about to debut in the building of homes, offices, bridges, and other structures. And a new report is highlighting both the potential benefits of these nanomaterials in improving construction materials and the need for guidelines to regulate their use and disposal. The report appears in the monthly journal ACS Nano. (2010-07-28)

The 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Cryo-electron microscopy explained (video)
Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson have claimed this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry. The trio earned the prize for their work on cryo-electron microscopy, which is an imaging technique that lets researchers see proteins and other large biomolecules with atomic precision. Learn more about this discovery and its impact in this video from Speaking of Chemistry: https://youtu.be/026rzTXb1zw. (2017-10-05)

Living sensor can potentially prevent environmental disasters from fuel spills
By the time a Colonial Pipeline leak was detected last fall during a routine inspection, vapors from the quarter-million gallons of released gasoline were so strong they prevented pipeline repair for days. Now, scientists report technology that would alert pipeline managers about leaks much earlier, avoiding the environmental disasters and fuel distribution disruptions resulting from pipeline leaks. The researchers present their work today at the 255th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2018-03-18)

Popular insecticide detected in suburban stream beds
For the first time, researchers have detected high concentrations of pyrethroids, a popular insecticide, in suburban stream sediments, raising concerns about its effects on aquatic life. The finding, by Donald Weston of the University of California, Berkeley and others, appears in the Dec. 1, issue of the American Chemical Society's journal, Environmental Science & Technology. (2005-10-26)

Scaling to new heights with gecko-inspired adhesive
Some animals, such as geckos, can easily climb up walls and across ceilings. But currently, no material exists that allows everyday people to scale walls or transverse ceilings as effortlessly. Now, scientists report in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces a dry adhesive that could someday make it easier to defy gravity. (2018-01-10)

Elevated lead in private wells could pose health risks
Since the Flint Water Crisis in Michigan, concern in the US over lead in drinking water has increased. Information about water from private wells has been limited because such wells are exempt from the 1974 Safe Drinking Water Act, the 1986 Lead Ban and the 2011 Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act. Now, researchers report a case study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology that sheds some light on the hidden health risks. (2018-03-14)

Fast forensic test can match suspects' DNA with crime samples in 4 hours
A newly developed test could make checking DNA from people arrested for crimes with DNA samples from crime scenes stored in forensic databases almost as easy as matching fingerprints. With the test, police could check on whether a person's DNA matches that found at past crime scenes while suspects are still being processed and before a decision on whether to release them on bail. A report on the fast forensic test appears in the ACS' Analytical Chemistry, a semimonthly journal. (2010-08-04)

Deep learning applied to drug discovery and repurposing
Scientists from Insilico Medicine in collaboration with Datalytic Solutions and Mind Research Network trained deep neural networks to predict the therapeutic use of large number of multiple drugs using gene expression data obtained from high-throughput experiments on human cell lines. (2016-05-26)

Study suggests measurable impact of colorectal cancer screening program
A new study suggests that an American Cancer Society (ACS) program has been effective in promoting improvements in colorectal cancer screening rates in federally qualified health centers (2017-11-30)

Quantum dots display promise for polymers
Rice University scientists employ the power of the sun to build functional synthetic polymers using photosensitive, semiconducting quantum dots as a catalyst. (2018-02-08)

New accreditation program sets framework for rectal cancer care in the US
The National Accreditation Program for Rectal Cancer establishes guidelines for a multidisciplinary team approach to help meet its proposed quality measures. (2018-03-23)

Gallium and the history of the periodic table (video)
Some chemists might see the periodic table of elements as a holy testament to the power of science. However, when it first debuted, it was a different kind of holey, and its journey to classroom walls everywhere had a whole lot of bumps. Watch as Reactions digs into the history of the periodic table with the help of a vanishing spoon, a man named after a rooster, and a bearded Russian. (2018-01-30)

Novel MOF shell-derived surface modification of Li-rich layered oxide cathode
The poor cycling stability and low rate performance become the big bottleneck of high specific capacity Li-rich layered oxide materials. Recently, a research team led by Prof. L. Q. Mai at Wuhan University of Technology developed a unique NiCo nanodots decorated carbon shell on Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 nanoparticles. The unique protective C&NiCo shell allows fast electron and ion transport and provides a robust structure for LLO. The obtained LLO@C&NiCo cathode exhibits enhanced cycling and rate capability. (2017-12-29)

A new study shows what makes humans look older or younger using artificial intelligence
There are many factors that influence the aging process. Unlocking these factors can lead to valuable insights into what impacts the condition and health of the human body and reveal how to minimize these impacts. Researchers from Haut.AI and Insilico Medicine have developed a simple and accurate predictor of chronological age called the PhotoAgeClock. The new research shows that the corners of the eye are the most important area for age prediction. (2018-11-26)

Heart attack risk increases with six-month dual antiplatelet therapy
The combined rate of death from any cause, heart attack or stroke within 18 months was not significantly different in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who were randomly assigned to receive dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) for either six months or at least 12 months after receiving a drug-eluting stent. (2018-03-12)

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