Popular Actions News and Current Events

Popular Actions News and Current Events, Actions News Articles.
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One among many
Anyone moving in a large crowd, absorbed in their phone and yet avoiding collisions, follows certain laws that they themselves create. The movement of individuals as a condition for the movement of masses is the subject of a recent study by Dr. Andrey Korbut from the Higher School of Economics. (2019-03-12)

Doubling down
Over the recent decade, total human impacts to the world's oceans have, on average, nearly doubled and could double again in the next decade without adequate action. That's according to a new study by researchers from the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) at UC Santa Barbara. (2019-08-13)

New tool developed by UBC researchers helps conservationists make smarter decisions
A new tool developed by University of British Columbia researchers could help ensure limited conservation dollars are well spent by determining which actions would save the most species per dollar. (2018-09-15)

Identifying artificial intelligence 'blind spots'
A novel model developed by MIT and Microsoft researchers identifies instances in which autonomous systems have 'learned' from training examples that don't match what's actually happening in the real world. Engineers could use this model to improve the safety of artificial intelligence systems, such as driverless vehicles and autonomous robots. (2019-01-24)

Belief in free will predicts criminal punishment support, disapproval of unethical actions
In countries with transparent governments and low levels of corruption, the belief in free will -- that is, believing that people's outcomes are tied to choices and personal responsibility -- predicts someone's intolerance of unethical behavior along with a greater desire to see criminals harshly punished for their actions. (2017-06-26)

Love actually: Americans agree on what makes people 'feel the love'
Americans may disagree on many things, but love might not be one of them. According to researchers, people in the US largely agree about what makes them feel loved, coming to a general consensus that it may be small gestures that matter most. (2017-11-06)

Infants understand that more desirable rewards require more effort
Infants who observe someone putting more effort into attaining a goal attribute more value to it, a new study finds. (2017-11-23)

Autism and theory of mind
Theory of mind, or the ability to represent other people's minds as distinct from one's own, can be difficult for people with autism. A new test provides researchers with a better understanding of the source of this difficulty. (2019-01-25)

Solidarity between good and justice keeps a society together
Soka University researcher Isamu Okada and his collaborators Tatsuya Sasaki (University of Vienna) and Yutaka Nakai (Shibaura Institute of Technology) have found that the solidarity of philanthropism and reciprocity is necessary to maintain cooperative societies. Their paper was published in Scientific Reports on Aug. 29, 2017. (2017-09-22)

Calling your bluff: Supervisors easily sniff out what drives a worker
Good supervisors aren't easily duped by the motives of underlings who go the extra mile -- they know when an employee is sucking up to them because of personal ambition, or when such actions truly have what's best for the organization at heart. (2015-03-05)

Do as i say: Translating language into movement
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a computer model that can translate text describing physical movements directly into simple computer-generated animations, a first step toward someday generating movies directly from scripts. (2019-09-10)

The fear of losing control and its role in anxiety disorders
Did you lock the front door? Did you double-check? Are you sure? If this sounds familiar, perhaps you can relate to people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Help may be on the way. New Concordia research sheds light on how the fear of losing control over thoughts and actions impacts OCD-related behavior, including checking. (2017-12-13)

Game changing game changes
Using stochastic games to analyze evolution of cooperation, leads to a surprising discovery. The tragedy of the commons is resolved if the environment deteriorates in response to defection. The new approach offers invaluable insight into how cooperation plays a role in social issues ranging from sustainability to curbing climate change. It can also help policy makers to design systems which empower cooperation among the public. (2018-07-10)

Exposing hypocrisy can effectively reduce collective blame of Muslims for individual violent acts
White Americans were less likely to blame all Muslims for acts of terror committed by a Muslim when they were first asked to think about how much they were responsible for terrorist acts committed by other Whites. By highlighting the hypocrisy in a non-threatening way, the participants' prejudice toward Muslims declined, even a month after the intervention. (2018-01-17)

Marine conservation must consider human rights
Ocean conservation is essential for protecting the marine environment and safeguarding the resources that people rely on for livelihoods and food security. But there are many documented cases where conservation has bumped up against the people who share the same places and resources, even leading to human rights abuses. (2017-05-03)

Study: Many parents of children with disabilities don't make care plans
Many parents of children with disabilities don't make advance care plans in the event of the parent's or other caretaker's death or disability, according to a new nationwide survey by special education professor Meghan Burke at the University of Illinois. (2018-02-09)

Pride tops guilt as a motivator for environmental decisions
A lot of pro-environmental messages suggest that people will feel guilty if they don't make an effort to live more sustainably or takes steps to ameliorate climate change. But a recent study from Princeton University finds that highlighting the pride people will feel if they take such actions may be a better way to change environmental behaviors. (2018-02-13)

Study compares effectiveness of weight-loss drugs
In an analysis that included nearly 30,000 overweight or obese adults, compared with placebo, orlistat, lorcaserin, naltrexone-bupropion, phentermine-topiramate, and liraglutide were each associated with achieving at least 5 percent weight loss at 52 weeks, and phentermine-topiramate and liraglutide were associated with the highest odds of achieving at least 5 percent weight loss, according to a study appearing in the June 14 issue of JAMA. (2016-06-14)

Even without the clean power plan, US can achieve Paris Agreement emissions reductions
Carnegie Mellon University researchers have calculated that the US can meet -- or even beat -- the near-term carbon dioxide emission reductions required by the United Nations Paris Agreement, despite the Trump Administration's withdrawal of the Clean Power Plan (CPP). (2018-02-16)

Thyroid cancer discovery points to new treatments, prevention
The actions of a mutated protein in cells linked to thyroid cancer have been uncovered by researchers at Queen's University. The discovery paves the way for the future development of drugs to more effectively target, treat and possibly even prevent both inherited and non-inherited thyroid cancers. (2006-11-15)

Teaching chores to an AI
Recently, computer scientists have been working on teaching machines to do a wider range of tasks around the house. In a new paper spearheaded by MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and the University of Toronto, researchers demonstrate 'VirtualHome,' a system that can simulate detailed household tasks and then have artificial 'agents' execute them, opening up the possibility of one day teaching robots to do such tasks. (2018-05-30)

Research could improve management of conflict between wildlife and farmers across the globe
A new study led by the University of Stirling highlights improvements in the way conflicts between wildlife conservation and farming are managed worldwide. (2018-03-12)

Study tackles neuroscience claims to have disproved 'free will'
For several decades, some researchers have argued that neuroscience studies prove human actions are driven by external stimuli -- that the brain is reactive and free will is an illusion. But a new analysis of these studies shows that many contained methodological inconsistencies and conflicting results. (2018-03-12)

The perils of publishing location data for endangered species
While the increasing accessibility of data from scientific studies creates many benefits -- and represents a process that should be broadly embraced -- in the context of conserving endangered species it can actually be problematic, write David Lindenmayer and Ben Scheele in this Essay. (2017-05-25)

Cringeworthy politics: Trump sparks 'embarrassment' spikes on Twitter
A piece of not-fake-news: there has been a 45-percent increase in people tweeting about embarrassment since Donald Trump took office. In an analysis of Twitter traffic between June 2015 and June 2017, researchers revealed how the platform's users responded to Trump's actions at high-profile events. (2019-03-27)

Fear and hoping: Adding hope to health messages may motivate better behaviors
While fear about health concerns may grip people, adding a little hope to a message might make people more willing to take preventative actions, according to researchers. (2018-02-23)

How badly do you want something? Babies can tell
Babies as young as 10 months can assess how much someone values a particular goal by observing how hard they are willing to work to achieve it, according to a new study from MIT and Harvard. This ability requires integrating information about both the costs of obtaining a goal and the benefit gained by the person seeking it, suggesting that babies acquire very early an intuition about how people make decisions. (2017-11-23)

Artificial agent designs quantum experiments
On the way to an intelligent laboratory, physicists from Innsbruck and Vienna present an artificial agent that autonomously designs quantum experiments. In initial experiments, the system has independently (re)discovered experimental techniques that are nowadays standard in modern quantum optical laboratories. This shows how machines could play a more creative role in research in the future. (2018-01-19)

Melatonin may help treat blood cancers
Researchers have examined the potential benefits of melatonin, a hormone made by a small gland in the brain, for treating blood cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma. (2017-09-01)

Change health messaging to focus on potential impact to help stop the next pandemic
Changing public health messaging to focus on the impact of our actions -- for example the potentially harmful impact of infecting a colleague with a cold, rather than whether we will infect them if we go into work in the first place -- could have significant implications for how we deal with global threats, according to a new study from City University of London, the Oxford Martin School (University of Oxford), and Yale University. (2018-07-09)

The brain's GPS has a buddy system
Brain cells that reflect self position relative to others have been identified in the rat hippocampus. Sometimes these representations are processed jointly by the same cells, depending on a rat's goals and actions. This discovery, from Japan's RIKEN Brain Science Institute, deepens our understanding of the hippocampus and its role as the brain's positioning system. (2018-01-11)

Study finds addiction associated with poor awareness of others
Developmental psychologist Maria Pagano, PhD, found adolescents with severe alcohol and other drug problems have a low regard for others, as indicated by higher rates of driving under the influence and having unprotected sex with a history of sexually transmitted disease. The findings also showed that they are less likely to volunteer their time helping others, an activity that she has been shown to help adult alcoholics stay sober. (2016-03-31)

'Doing science,' rather than 'being scientists,' more encouraging to girls
Asking young girls to 'do science' leads them to show greater persistence in science activities than does asking them to 'be scientists,' finds a new psychology study by researchers at New York University and Princeton University. (2019-02-06)

Adolescents' values can serve as a buffer against behaving violently at school
A study conducted among Arab and Jewish adolescents in public schools in Israel found that certain values helped protect teens against behaving violently. Surveys among 907 students examined how 10 different values related to violent behavior. Teens who valued universalism reported less violent behavior than their peers. Those who valued power reported more violent behavior. In high-risk environments, programs might be used to promote universalistic values over power values. (2008-05-15)

Following Presidential action, AGS renews call for bipartisan collaboration
Presidential action to alter current law risks undermining progress made by Congress, the American people, and a cadre of healthcare stakeholders to improve care access, care quality, and care costs for us all as we age, so say experts at the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) evaluating recent orders by the Trump Administration. In light of these concerns, the AGS continues to call for stakeholder input, public hearings, and ample opportunities for feedback on health reform from the American public. (2017-10-13)

UC Davis hosts the second Climate-Smart Agriculture Global Science Conference
The University of California, Davis, will host the second Climate-Smart Agriculture Global Science Conference on March 20-22, 2013. Co-organized by UC Davis and the World Bank, the conference will focus on science-based actions that can provide resilience for food systems despite the future uncertainty of climate change and extreme events. (2013-02-19)

Did Teddy Evans fatally undermine Scott of the Antarctic?
University of New South Wales' Professor Chris Turney has uncovered documents and diary entries that suggest a team member stole food Scott needed, failed to pass on orders that would have sent out a dog team to meet the men and then changed his story over time to cover up his role in their deaths. (2017-10-05)

Cells programmed like computers to fight disease
Cells can be programmed like a computer to fight cancer, influenza, and other serious conditions -- thanks to a breakthrough in synthetic biology by the University of Warwick. (2017-09-18)

Alcohol industry health campaigns miss the mark by a longshot
Far from confirming industry claims that they can 'do good' with corporate campaigns, the findings suggest that the public health benefits are likely to be minimal. In fact, 11 percent of the industry actions had the potential for doing harm. (2018-11-05)

Study: Journalists view co-workers as more ethical than peers
The University of Texas at Dallas' Dr. Angela Lee explored journalists' opinions about one another -- both their co-workers and their peers. As it turns out, they act much like the general public by trusting the actions of professionals working with them more than journalists at other outlets. The research was published online May 30 in the journal Journalism. (2018-07-13)

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