Popular Activation News and Current Events

Popular Activation News and Current Events, Activation News Articles.
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From sea to lab
With its vast numbers of different lifeforms, the sea is a largely unexplored source of natural products that could be starting points for new pharmaceuticals, such as the antitumor drugs trabectedin and lurbinectedin. Because only tiny amounts can be obtained from sea organisms, synthetic production is necessary. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have introduced a new, efficient synthetic route for these two drugs. A key step is the light-controlled activation of a carbon-hydrogen bond. (2019-02-18)

Innate immune system worsens the situation in severe COVID-19
In patients with severe COVID-19, the innate immune system overreacts. This overreaction may underlie the formation of blood clots (thrombi) and deterioration in oxygen saturation that affect the patients. This is shown in an Uppsala University study published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology. (2021-02-23)

Brain region central to placebo effect identified
Researchers have pinpointed a brain region central to the machinery of the placebo effect -- the often controversial phenomenon in which a person's belief in the efficacy of a treatment such as a painkilling drug influences its effect. (2007-07-18)

NUS scientists combine antimalarial drug with light sensitive molecules for promising treatment of cancer
NUS scientists discovered that a combination of artemisinin, which is a potent anti-malarial drug, and aminolaevulinic acid, which is a photosensitizer, could kill colorectal cancer cells and suppress tumor growth more effectively than administering artemisinin alone. This novel combination therapy could also have fewer side effects. (2017-09-18)

Flies the key to studying the causes of dementia
A research team from the University of Plymouth, University of Southampton and the Alexander Fleming Biomedical Sciences Research Center, Vari, Greece, have studied two structurally-similar proteins in the adult brain and have found that they play distinct roles in the development of dementia. (2017-05-19)

Here's something that will raise your blood pressure
The apelin receptor (APJ) has been presumed to play an important role in the contraction of blood vessels involved in blood pressure regulation. A University of Tsukuba-led research team found that APJ was closely associated with hypertension through effects on vascular smooth muscle cells in laboratory mice. In addition, APJ worked synergistically with the α1A-adrenergic receptor to cause vasoconstriction. These results may help to understand blood pressure regulation and support therapies for vascular diseases. (2019-11-01)

A new model for activation of the immune system
By studying a large protein (the C1 protein) with X-rays and electron microscopy, researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark have established a new model for how an important part of the innate immune system is activated. The activation of the C1 protein is a fundamental mechanism in immunology, and therefore the new research results also have medical potential. (2017-01-23)

Learning language
When it comes to learning a language, the left side of the brain has traditionally been considered the hub of language processing. But new research from the University of Delaware shows the right brain plays a critical early role in helping learners identify the basic sounds associated with a language. That could help find new teaching methods to better improve student success in picking up a foreign language. (2019-05-07)

Researchers develop a new method for turning skin cells into pluripotent stem cells
Researchers at the University of Helsinki, Finland, and Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, have for the first time succeeded in converting human skin cells into pluripotent stem cells by activating the cell's own genes. (2018-07-06)

The brain watched during language learning
Researchers from Nijmegen, the Netherlands, have for the first time captured images of the brain during the initial hours and days of learning a new language. They use an artificial language with real structures to show how new linguistic information is integrated into the same brain areas used for your native language. (2016-06-29)

Running away from addiction: How exercise aids smoking cessation
New research in mice sheds light on the mechanism underlining exercise's protective effect against nicotine dependence and withdrawal. (2017-12-20)

Mindfulness meditation reduces incidence of major depression
Among primary care patients with subthreshold depression, mindfulness meditation training reduces the incidence of major depression and improves depression symptoms. (2018-03-13)

NYU Abu Dhabi researchers unlock the secrets of liver regeneration
In a recent study published in the journal Developmental Cell, NYU Abu Dhabi researchers have reported a new way in which the liver is primed to regenerate itself. They found that by stripping parts of the epigenome, which play a primary role in repressing 'jumping genes' (i.e. transposable elements), other epigenetic marks were redistributed. (2019-06-20)

Reversing aging now possible!
DGIST's research team identified the mechanism of reversible recovery of aging cells by inducing lysosomal activation. The team opened a new horizon of aging recovery research by changing the irreversibility paradigm of aging. (2017-04-03)

Hybrid electrolyte enhances supercapacitance in vertical graphene nanosheets
Supercapacitors can store more energy than and are preferable to batteries because they are able to charge faster, mainly due to the vertical graphene nanosheets that are larger and positioned closer together. Using VGNs as the material for supercapacitor electrodes offers advantages that can be enhanced depending on how the material is grown, treated and prepared to work with electrolytes. In this week's Journal of Applied Physics, researchers discuss ways to improve the material's properties. (2017-12-05)

How does the immune system develop in the first days of life?
Researchers highlight the anti-inflammatory response taking place after birth and designed to shield the newborn from infection. Early protection is ensured by the innate immunity through the rapid development of the complement pathway during the first week after birth. (2020-10-22)

Specific protein plays key role in the spread of breast cancer
Researchers from the University of Liverpool have found an explanation for how breast cancer spreads to the lungs, which could potentially hold the key to preventing the progression of the disease. (2018-01-25)

Brain metastases cause severe brain damage that can be inhibited by treatment
By using a specific treatment to override this activation, the researchers were able to return cerebrovascular flow to healthy levels. This improvement in blood flow around the metastases can limit the neurological deterioration associated with the progression of this disease and improve the otherwise poor life expectancy of these patients. (2020-11-12)

Newborn Immune Activation May Have Long-Term Negative Impact on Brain FunctionNewborn immune activation may have long-term negative impact on brain function
McLean neuroscientists have found that even a brief episode of immune system activation within days of birth can cause persistent changes in sleep patterns concurrent with increases in epilepsy-like brain activity -- a combination of symptoms common in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental conditions. (2018-01-12)

Reprogrammed blood vessels promote cancer spread
Tumor cells use the bloodstream to spread in the body. To reach the blood, they first have to pass the wall of the vessel. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center have now identified a trick that the cancer cells use: They activate a cellular signal in the vessel lining cells. This makes the passage easier and promotes metastasis. In experiments with mice, the researchers were able to block this process using antibodies. (2017-03-03)

UV light improving chances of fighting cancer
Scientists at Newcastle University have developed a cancer fighting technology which uses UV light to activate antibodies which very specifically attack tumours. (2007-10-30)

HIV RNA expression inhibitors may restore immune function in HIV-infected individuals
Immune activation and inflammation persist in the majority of treated HIV-infected individuals and is associated with excess risk of mortality and morbidity. A new study by Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers suggests that use of HIV RNA expression inhibitors as adjunct therapy might diminish atypical inflammation and restore immune function in HIV-infected individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). (2018-08-27)

LSU Health research targets metformin as breast cancer prescription
Research conducted by Suresh Alahari, PhD, Professor of Biochemistry and Genetics at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, has found that metformin, a commonly prescribed drug for Type 2 Diabetes, may be effective in treating cancers that lack a protein called Nischarin. (2019-09-19)

New system developed that can switch on immune cells to attack cancer cells
Researchers have developed an artificial structure that mimics the cell membrane, which can switch on immune cells to attack and destroy a designated target. This method has potential to be used as a future cancer immunotherapy treatment as well as providing more insight into how immune cells are activated to find and kill cancer cells. The findings are presented today at the Joint Congress of the British and Dutch Societies for Immunology, taking place in Liverpool, UK. (2016-12-06)

New biomarkers of multiple sclerosis pathogenesis
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic debilitating inflammatory disease targeting the brain. The pathogenesis of MS remains largely unknown. It is believed that brain tissue damage is due to immune cells targeting and breaking up the myelin basic protein (MBP), which is essential for nerve cells function. (2017-05-19)

Researchers reveal how brain circuits are affected by infections in mothers and newborns
McLean Hospital neuroscientists have found that immune system activation during pregnancy and right at birth can cause alterations in the brain's neural circuits during young adulthood that are consistent with behavioral symptoms common in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental conditions. (2018-03-28)

Faulty sensing: Cellular energy sensor linked to the progression of chronic kidney disease
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with energy depletion in kidney cells, resulting in reduced kidney function. Researchers at TMDU and Kyushu University found that failure of an important cellular energy sensor to detect energy depletion is key to the progression of CKD. However, by stimulating the activity of the sensor using alternative methods, the researchers could halt CKD progression and repair some of the tissue damage. This mechanism therefore represents a novel therapeutic target. (2018-12-07)

Working to reduce brain injury in newborns
Research-clinicians at Children's National Health System led the first study to identify a promising treatment to reduce or prevent brain injury in newborns who have suffered hypoxia-ischemia, a serious complication in which restricted blood flow deprives the brain of oxygen. (2017-11-10)

How our senses connect with the stress system
Epigenetic programming following early life stress likely results from a dual-activation of the stress system and the sensory systems. Further research is warranted. (2018-04-16)

The brain's auto-complete function
When looking at a picture of a sunny day at the beach, we can almost smell the scent of sun screen. Our brain often completes memories and automatically brings back to mind the different elements of the original experience. A new collaborative study between the Universities of Birmingham and Bonn now reveals the underlying mechanisms of this auto-complete function. It is now published in the journal Nature Communications. (2019-04-03)

Attacking lymphoma at the source
The efficacy of target specific therapies in lymphoma is limited to subgroups of patients. EPFL scientists have identified a mechanism that confers resistance against a common therapy for lymphoma. They propose an alternative treatment that targets lymphoma signaling at its root, and show that it can be effective in a broader group of patients. The study is published in the journal Blood. (2018-03-22)

Clothes make the woman: Less empathy towards women showing more skin
Sexualized representations, especially the emphasis of secondary sexual characteristics, can change the way we perceive an individual. An international team of researchers led by Giorgia Silani from the Faculty of Psychology at the University of Vienna has shown that empathic feelings and brain responses are reduced when we observe the emotions of sexualized women. The results of the study were recently published in the renown scientific journal Cortex. (2018-01-11)

Every meal triggers inflammation
When we eat, we do not just take in nutrients -- we also consume a significant quantity of bacteria. The body is faced with the challenge of simultaneously distributing the ingested glucose and fighting these bacteria. This triggers an inflammatory response that activates the immune systems of healthy individuals and has a protective effect, as doctors from the University and the University Hospital Basel have proven for the first time. In overweight individuals, however, this inflammatory response fails so dramatically that it can lead to diabetes. (2017-01-16)

Can a novel high-density EEG approach disentangle the differences of visual event related potential (N170), elicited by negative facial stimuli, in people with subjective cognitive impairment?
Thessaloniki- Macedonia, Greece -- Sept. 14, 2018 -- Greek researchers investigated whether specific brain regions, which have been found to be highly activated after negative facial stimulus, are also activated in different groups of people with subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's Disease (AD) compared to healthy controls (HC). (2018-09-14)

Blocking one receptor could halt rheumatoid arthritis
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine have shown for the first time how the activation of a receptor provokes the inflammation and bone degradation of rheumatoid arthritis -- and that activation of this one receptor, found on cells in the fluid of arthritic joints, is all that is required. (2014-09-10)

Violent video games leave teenagers emotionally aroused
A new study has found that adolescents who play violent video games may exhibit lingering effects on brain function, including increased activity in the region of the brain that governs emotional arousal and decreased activity in the brain's executive function, which is associated with control, focus and concentration. The findings were presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. (2006-11-28)

Cellular stress increases the probability of developing autoimmune diseases
Researchers found that cellular stress enhances the activation of certain type of immune cells with implications in many chronic inflammatory conditions. (2017-06-13)

German researchers discover how sleep can fight infection
Researchers in Germany have discovered why sleep can sometimes be the best medicine. Sleep improves the potential ability of some of the body's immune cells to attach to their targets, according to a new study that will be published Feb. 12 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. The study, led by researchers at the University of Tübingen, helps explain how sleep can fight off an infection, whereas other conditions, such as chronic stress, can make the body more susceptible to illness. (2019-02-12)

Difficulty hearing may keep older patients from participating in their health care
In a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study of 13,940 adults age 65 years and older, nearly half reported difficulty hearing, and those reporting difficulty said that they had lower levels of active participation in their health care. (2019-04-03)

Mum's immune response could trigger social deficits for kids with autism
Children with autism are more likely to show severe social symptoms if their mother had chronic asthma or allergies while pregnant, the University of Sydney's Brain and Mind Centre reveals today in Molecular Psychiatry. (2017-10-10)

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