Popular Acute Myeloid Leukemia News and Current Events

Popular Acute Myeloid Leukemia News and Current Events, Acute Myeloid Leukemia News Articles.
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How reducing body temperature could help a tenth of all ICU patients
ROCKVILLE, MD - A tenth of all intensive care unit patients worldwide, and many critical patients with COVID-19, have acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). (2021-02-23)

Comprehensive pediatric CAR T guidelines developed by MD Anderson and PALISI
Almost one year after the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators Network (PALISI) today published treatment guidelines for managing the treatment in the online issue of Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology. (2018-08-06)

Penn-developed approach could limit toxicity of CAR T therapy in acute myeloid leukemia
A new approach pioneered at the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center may provide a new path towards treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with CAR T cells. (2018-05-31)

Cancer mortality continues steady decline, driven by progress against lung cancer
The cancer death rate declined by 29% from 1991 to 2017, including a 2.2% drop from 2016 to 2017, the largest single-year drop in cancer mortality ever reported. The news comes from Cancer Statistics, 2020, the latest edition of the American Cancer Society's annual report on cancer rates and trends. (2020-01-08)

The mental health impact of pandemics for front line health care staff
New research shows the impact that pandemics have on the mental health of front-line health care staff. Researchers investigated how treating patients in past pandemics such as SARS and MERS affected the mental health of front-line staff. They found that over a third experienced anxiety or depression, almost a quarter experienced PTSD. The team hope that their work will help highlight the impact that the Covid-19 pandemic could be having on the mental health of doctors and nurses worldwide. (2020-10-16)

Noninvasive stimulation device can help prevent migraine attacks
A migraine is much more than just a bad headache. Migraine symptoms, which can be debilitating for many people, are the sixth leading cause of disability, according to the World Health Organization. (2018-03-28)

New blood cancer treatment works by selectively interfering with cancer cell signalling
University of Alberta scientists have identified the mechanism of action behind a new type of precision cancer drug for blood cancers that is set for human trials, according to research published in Nature Communications. (2020-10-22)

New epidemiological study finds no connection between cases of cancer and use of plant protection products containing glyphosate
BfR Communication No. 036/2017 from 22 December 2017 Epidemiological studies are a central element of public discussion in the debate surrounding the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate. A publication that appeared in the USA in November examined whether there is a possible connection between the use of glyphosate containing plant protection products and cases of cancer among people who work in agriculture using a significantly broader data base. (2018-01-12)

Smoking in patients with heart attack reduced with varenicline
In patients who have had a heart attack, the drug varenicline significantly reduced smoking during the following year, found a randomized controlled trial published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2018-03-26)

How the enzyme lipoxygenase drives heart failure after heart attacks
Heart failure after a heart attack is a global epidemic leading to heart failure pathology. Ganesh Halade, Ph.D., is seeking ways to delay or reverse this heart failure, which comes from non-resolved chronic inflammation. In a study in Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, Halade and colleagues detail the profound lipidomic and metabolic signatures and the modified leukocyte profiling that delay heart failure progression and provide improved survival in 12/15 lipoxygenase-deficient mice. (2019-05-31)

BIDMC-lead team develops new approach to study long non-coding RNAs
In a groundbreaking paper, investigators at the Cancer Research Institute Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center developed a novel approach to identify and determine the functional role of lncRNAs relevant to chemotherapy resistance in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). The new technique integrates information from publicly-available pharmacological data bases with leading-edge CRISPR technologies to screen for both coding and non-coding genes that influence response to treatment. (2018-04-19)

Study shows area undamaged by stroke remains so, regardless of time stroke is left untreated
A study led by Achala Vagal, M.D., associate professor at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and a UC Health radiologist, looked at a group of untreated acute stroke patients and found that there was no evidence of time dependence on damage outcomes for the penumbra, or tissue that is at risk of progressing to dead tissue but is still salvageable if blood flow is returned in a stroke, but rather an association with collateral flow -- or rerouting of blood through clear vessels. (2016-05-25)

Moffitt researchers identify new target to reduce risk of GVHD
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are trying to identify new drug targets to reduce the risk of GVHD. Their new study, published last week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows a drug that targets the protein JAK2 may reduce the risk of GVHD. (2018-02-05)

For some, high blood pressure associated with better survival
Patients with both type 2 diabetes and acute heart failure face a significantly lower risk of death but a higher risk of heart failure-related hospitalizations if they had high systolic blood pressure on discharge from the hospital compared to those with normal blood pressure, according to a study scheduled for presentation at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session. (2017-03-08)

Healthy blood stem cells have as many DNA mutations as leukemic cells
Researchers from the Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology have shown that the number of mutations in healthy and leukemic blood stem cells does not differ. Rather the location of the mutations in the DNA is relevant. Using the mutation patterns in the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) the team was able to trace the developmental lineage tree of the cells. (2018-11-28)

Prebiotics may help to cope with stress
Probiotics are well known to benefit digestive health, but prebiotics are less well understood. Recent study in rats shows that prebiotic fibers may help to protect beneficial gut bacteria and restore healthy sleep patterns after a stressful event. (2017-02-10)

Mutations in bone cells can drive leukemia in neighboring stem cells
DNA mutations in bone cells that support blood development can drive leukemia formation in nearby blood stem cells. This neighbor cell effect was observed in a mouse model of Noonan syndrome. In mice, drugs can stop the effect and potentially could combat leukemia progression/recurrence. (2016-10-26)

COVID-19: Immune system derails
Contrary to what has been generally assumed so far, a severe course of COVID-19 does not solely result in a strong immune reaction - rather, the immune response is caught in a continuous loop of activation and inhibition. Experts from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the University of Bonn, the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI) and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), along with colleagues from a nationwide research network, present these findings in Cell. (2020-08-06)

Brain DNA 'remodeled' in alcoholism
Reshaping of the DNA scaffolding that supports and controls the expression of genes in the brain may play a major role in alcohol withdrawal symptoms, particularly anxiety, that makes it so difficult to stop using alcohol by alcoholics, researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine and the Jesse Brown VA Medical Center report in a study in the April 2 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience. (2008-04-01)

New hope for treating heart failure
Heart failure patients who are getting by on existing drug therapies can look forward to a far more effective medicine in the next five years or so, thanks to University of Alberta researchers. (2017-03-07)

Russian chemists discovered a surprising effect of a well-known leukemia drug
Researchers from RUDN University and Institute of Biomedical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences have identified an alternative mechanism for the effective antitumor drug -- an enzyme called L-asparaginase. Some isoenzymes of L-asparaginase block the growth of telomeres (region of repetitive nucleotide sequences at each end of a chromosome) on DNA molecules, and this limits the number of divisions of a cancer cell. This effect is reported in the Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. (2017-11-10)

Combination therapy more effective than chemotherapy alone for many newly diagnosed leukemia patients
A Phase II study pairing azacitidine with enasidenib boosts complete remission in patients with AML with IDH2 mutations. (2019-12-09)

Long-term IMPACT data find improved survival when targeted therapies matched to tumor-specific gene mutations
Matching targeted therapies to tumor-specific gene mutations across tumor types improved progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced disease relative to those receiving non-matched treatment (NMT), according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The researchers also found that receiving matched targeted therapy (MTT) was an independent factor for predicting longer OS. (2018-06-02)

A star disturbed the comets of the solar system in prehistory
About 70,000 years ago, when the human species was already on Earth, a small reddish star approached our solar system and gravitationally disturbed comets and asteroids. Astronomers from the Complutense University of Madrid and the University of Cambridge have verified that the movement of some of these objects is still marked by that stellar encounter. (2018-03-20)

Preserving the power of antibiotics
News release describes efforts to address inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in emergency departments and urgent-care centers nationwide, which a JAMA study published this past May found rates as high as 50 percent for acute respiratory infections in US emergency departments. Now the CDC has awarded UC Davis ED physician Larissa May a one-year grant to test two educational and behavioral interventions for physicians in emergency settings in California and Colorado. (2016-10-06)

MRI analysis with machine learning predicts impairment after spinal injury, study shows
A test of machine-learning algorithms shows promise for computer-aided prognosis of acute spinal cord injury, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2018 Annual Meeting, set for April 22-27 in Washington, D.C. (2018-04-05)

Cardiovascular disease: The immune response to heart attacks
The damage caused by a heart attack triggers an inflammatory reaction which degrades the affected tissue. This response is orchestrated by immune cells that reside in the nearby pericardial adipose tissue, as a study by a team of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich shows. (2017-11-28)

Methadone may reduce need for opioids after surgery
Patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery who are treated with methadone during the procedure require significantly less intravenous and oral opioids to manage postoperative pain, reports a new study published in the May issue of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). (2017-04-24)

Newly published report outlines roadmap for modernizing inhalation toxicity testing
A report outlining the findings from an international expert workshop have been published in the journal Toxicology in Vitro. This comprehensive report recommends specific steps toward achieving global regulatory acceptance of non-animal testing approaches to acute inhalation toxicity. As a result of these recommendations, working groups have been formed to gather reference data, develop a state-of-the-science review article on existing in silico and in vitro approaches, and conduct testing to show the value of these approaches (2018-01-04)

Ancient anti-inflammatory drug salicylic acid has cancer-fighting properties
Scientists from the Gladstone Institutes have identified a new pathway by which salicylic acid -- a key compound in the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs aspirin and diflunisal -- stops inflammation and tumor growth in cancer. Both salicylic acid and diflunisal suppress two key proteins that help control gene expression throughout the body. By inhibiting these proteins, the two drugs block the activation of other proteins involved in inflammation and cell growth, including one linked to leukemia. (2016-05-31)

U of M begins nation's first clinical trial using T-reg cells from cord blood in leukemia treatment
University of Minnesota researchers have initiated a ground breaking clinical trial to determine the optimal dose and safety of T regulatory cells (T-regs) to decrease the risk of immune reactions common in patients undergoing blood and marrow transplantation. (2007-09-05)

Personalizing chemotherapy to treat pediatric leukemia
A team of UCLA bioengineers has demonstrated that its technology may go a long way toward overcoming the challenges of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, among the most common types of cancer in children, and has the potential to help doctors personalize drug doses. (2016-12-12)

Inflammation in regeneration: A friend or foe?
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have discovered a novel mechanism linking inflammation and organ regeneration in fish, which can be conserved among vertebrates. (2017-03-06)

Probiotic no better than placebo for acute gastroenteritis in children
While probiotics are often used to treat acute gastroenteritis (also known as infectious diarrhea) in children, the latest evidence shows no significant differences in outcomes, compared to a placebo. (2018-11-21)

Novel compound restores immune response in patients with melanoma
A novel compound may restore immune response in patients with melanoma, according to a study presented at the ESMO Immuno Oncology Congress 2017. (2017-12-08)

Linking heart attack damage to the spleen and kidney, an integrated study of heart failure
Ganesh Halade, who uses a mouse heart attack model to research ways to prevent heart failure, has published a functional and structural compendium of the simultaneous changes taking place in the heart, spleen and kidneys in mice during the period of acute heart failure immediately following a heart attack and during the longer period of chronic heart failure that comes next. (2017-11-15)

Adaptive human immunity depends on the factor responsible for the formation of white blood cells
Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)has a significant regulatory effect not only on innate, but also on adaptive immunity. That's what scientists from the IKBFU and Research Institute of Fundamental and Clinical Immunology have found. (2019-10-31)

The HLF-gene controls the generation of our long-term immune system
A research group at Lund University in Sweden has found that when the HLF (hepatic leukemia factor) gene -- which is expressed in immature blood cells -- does not shut down on time, we are unable to develop a functional long-term immune system. This could be a very early stage of leukemia. (2017-11-22)

Study explores impact of obesity on bone marrow cells
New research published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine highlights the pernicious effect of obesity on the long-term health of blood-making stem cells (hematopoietic stem cells). Published Dec. 27 and conducted largely in genetic models of obese mice, the study shows obesity causes durable and harmful changes to the hematopoietic stem cell compartment - the blood-making factory in our bodies. (2017-12-27)

Racial and ethnic differences seen in antibiotics prescribed for viral illnesses in pediatric EDs
Non-Latino white children seeking treatment for viral infections in the Emergency Department are about twice as likely to receive an antibiotic unnecessarily compared with non-Latino black children or Latino children, a multi-center study indicates. (2017-09-05)

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