Popular Adam Matthew News and Current Events

Popular Adam Matthew News and Current Events, Adam Matthew News Articles.
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Lung transplant patients face elevated lung cancer risk
In an American Journal of Transplantation study, lung cancer risk was increased after lung transplantation, especially in the native (non-transplanted) lung of single lung transplant recipients. (2018-12-19)

Yale-NUS scientist and collaborators solve open theoretical problem on electron interactions
New discovery published in Science explains what happens during the phase transition in Dirac materials, paving the way for engineering advanced electronics that perform significantly faster. (2018-08-09)

Nearly half of women who stop smoking during pregnancy go back to smoking soon after baby is born
A major new review published today by the scientific journal Addiction reveals that in studies testing the effectiveness of stop-smoking support for pregnant women, nearly half (43 percent) of the women who managed to stay off cigarettes during the pregnancy went back to smoking within six months of the birth. (2016-03-15)

Balancing time & space in the brain: New model holds promise for predicting brain dynamics
A team of scientists has extended the balanced network model to provide deep and testable predictions linking brain circuits to brain activity. (2016-10-31)

How to win friends online: It's not which groups you join, but how many
The chances that people will form new friendships primarily depends on the number rather than the types of organizations, groups and cliques they join, according to an analysis of six online social networks by Rice University data scientists. (2018-09-26)

CAR-T immunotherapy eliminates metastatic colorectal cancer in mice
A CAR-T-based immunotherapy successfully kills tumors and prevents metastatic growth, in final preclinical tests before human trials. (2018-05-01)

Temperature may affect pollen color
While studies on flowers' petal-color variation abound, new research looks at differences in the performance of pollen under varied environmental conditions based on its color. (2018-01-05)

New vaccine technique effectively fights breast cancer in mice
The body's own immune system can effectively fight breast cancer with the help of a new vaccine technique, researchers from the University of Copenhagen show in mice trials. The technique holds great potential if the effect translates to humans, the researchers find. (2017-11-30)

Plant-derived volatiles may serve as future antifungals
A research team at the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Microbiology has developed a novel screening method to identify antimicrobial properties of volatile substances. With this assay, they tested the vapour-phase-mediated activity of 175 essential oils (EOs) and 37 EO components. Approximately half of them proved active against the most drug-resistant type of Candida. (2018-03-09)

People use emotion to persuade, even when it could backfire
We intuitively use more emotional language to enhance our powers of persuasion, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The research shows that people tend toward appeals that aren't simply more positive or negative but are infused with emotionality, even when they're trying to sway an audience that may not be receptive to such language. (2018-04-02)

How maximizing fish stocks in the long-term will reduce bycatch
Efforts to sustainably manage fisheries will also reduce bycatch, a new study suggests. (2018-03-15)

Scale-eating fish adopt clever parasitic methods to survive
A small group of fishes -- possibly the world's cleverest carnivorous grazers -- feeds on the scales of other fish in the tropics. A team led by biologists at the University of Washington is trying to understand these scale-feeding fish and how this odd diet influences their body evolution and behavior. (2018-01-17)

Try togetherness: Study promotes cooperative weed management to curb herbicide resistance
In the fight against herbicide resistance, farmers are working with a shrinking toolkit. Waterhemp, a weedy nemesis of corn and soybean farmers, has developed resistance to multiple herbicide modes of action, often in the same plant. Even farmers using the latest recommendations for tank mixtures are fighting an uphill battle, with long-distance movement of pollen and seeds bringing the potential for new types of resistance into their fields each year. (2018-06-04)

Study compares countries' mortality rates after aneurysm surgery
There is substantial international variation in mortality rates after treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysm, or enlargement of the aorta. A BJS (British Journal of Surgery) study that compared 10-year data from England and Sweden found that mortality rates were initially better in Sweden but improved over time alongside greater use of a minimally invasive procedure called endovascular aneurysm repair in England. Now there is no difference between postoperative mortality rates after aneurysm repair in England and Sweden. (2018-02-22)

Fish accounted for surprisingly large part of the Stone Age diet
New research at Lund University in Sweden can now show what Stone Age people actually ate in southern Scandinavia 10 000 years ago. The importance of fish in the diet has proven to be greater than expected. So, if you want to follow a Paleo diet -- you should quite simply eat a lot of fish. (2018-03-19)

Sodium- and potassium-based batteries hold promise for cheap energy storage
Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have found new evidence suggesting that batteries based on sodium and potassium hold promise as a potential alternative to lithium-based batteries. (2018-06-19)

Millions of novel genetic variants found in 1000 Swedish individuals
An extensive exercise to map genetic variation in Sweden has found 33 million genetic variants, 10 million of which are novel. Large-scale DNA sequencing methods were used to analyse the whole genome of 1000 individuals from different parts of the country. The study was led by researchers at Uppsala University, who have published their findings in the European Journal of Human Genetics. (2017-08-25)

Transfusion dependence a barrier to quality end-of-life care for some with leukemia
For patients with advanced leukemia, access to high-quality end-of-life care appears to be reduced in those dependent on blood transfusions, according to a new study being presented during the 59th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition in Atlanta. The study associates this reduced access and consequent diminished use of hospice services with a reduced quality of end-of-life care for these patients. (2017-12-11)

ANU research reveals genetic timeline of early Pacific settlers
Researchers from The Australian National University have helped put together the most comprehensive study ever conducted into the origins of people in Vanuatu -- regarded as a geographic gateway from Asia to the Remote Pacific. (2018-03-09)

New discovery to accelerate development of salt-tolerant grapevines
A recent discovery by Australian scientists is likely to improve the sustainability of the Australian wine sector and significantly accelerate the breeding of more robust salt-tolerant grapevines. (2017-11-27)

Previous influenza virus exposures enhance susceptibility in another influenza pandemic
New data analysis suggests that people born at the time of the 1957 H2N2 or Asian Flu pandemic were at a higher risk of dying during the 2009 H1N1 Swine Flu pandemic as well as the resurgent H1N1 outbreak in 2013-2014. And it is not the first time this has happened. (2018-01-16)

Youth cybercrime linked to friends' influence
Peer influence and low self-control appear to be the major factors fueling juvenile cybercrime such as computer hacking and online bullying, according to a new study led by a Michigan State University criminologist. (2011-06-23)

2017 hurricane season follows year of extremes
2016 hurricane season started in January and ended 318 days later in late-November. Hurricane Matthew was the first Category 5 in a decade, the longest stretch without one since 1950. (2017-06-01)

Complex, old-growth forests may protect some bird species in a warming climate
Old forests that contain large trees and a diversity of tree sizes and species may offer refuge to some types of birds facing threats in a warming climate, scientists have found. (2017-12-15)

Greedy CEOs bad for business
The pursuit of extreme wealth by top managers can lead to lower performance and loss of shareholder value, a new study finds. But, a powerful board or long CEO tenure can moderate the impact. (2014-06-20)

Space weather, EarthScope, and protecting the national electrical grid
Geomagnetic disturbances from solar storms or electromagnetic pulse weapons pose a high risk to the electrical power grid. This project examines a real-world example of 3-D mapping of the crust and mantle in the northwestern US from EarthScope data to determine risks posed by ground conductivity that could amplify or change how geomagnetic disturbances affect power lines. This new 3-D method detected surprising effects that the current 1-D method of risk assessment fails to detect. (2017-12-12)

Big data identifies lipids as signatures of health and disease
Scientists from EPFL and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have carried out one of the most extensive lipidomics studies to date, connecting almost 150 different lipid species to their respective genetic regulators, revealing signatures of metabolic health and disease. Published in two papers in Cell Systems, the study is a landmark for metabolic health science. (2018-06-13)

Natural selection is not the only process that drives evolution
Why have some of our genes evolved rapidly? It is widely believed that Darwinian natural selection is responsible, but research led by a group at Uppsala University, suggests that a separate neutral (nonadaptive) process has made a significant contribution to human evolution. Their results have been published today in the journal PLoS Biology. (2009-01-26)

American Federation for Aging Research experts featured in PBS special: Incredible Aging
Fourteen AFAR experts are among those featured in (2018-03-14)

What triggered the 100,000-year Ice Age cycle?
A slowing of ocean circulation in the waters surrounding Antarctica drastically altered the strength and more than doubled the length of global ice ages following the mid-Pleistocene transition, a new study finds. (2019-03-07)

Changing climate to bring more landslides on logged land, say WSU researchers
Washington State University researchers say landslides on logged forests will be more widespread as the Northwest climate changes. In a study modelled on clear-cut lands on the Olympic Peninsula, they anticipate the climate of 2045 and conclude that there will be a 7 -11 percent increase in the land that is highly vulnerable to landslides. The researchers say their findings are applicable to the Cascade Mountain Range area as well. (2017-11-09)

Nano-spike catalysts convert carbon dioxide directly into ethanol
In a new twist to waste-to-fuel technology, scientists have developed an electrochemical process that uses tiny spikes of carbon and copper to turn carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, into ethanol. (2016-10-12)

Using dogs to find cats
Investigators are using specially-trained detection dogs to determine the numbers and distribution of cheetah in a region of Western Zambia. The research represents the first demonstration of this strategy for wide-ranging species that are often threatened. (2017-02-23)

Hormone from fat boosts metabolism in both exercise and cold
Researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center have uncovered a new kind of clue to an individual's variable response to exercise -- a hormone whose levels in the bloodstream rise sharply in exercise as well as in cold. (2018-05-01)

Artificial enzymes convert solar energy into hydrogen gas
In a new scientific article, researchers at Uppsala University describe how, using a completely new method, they have synthesised an artificial enzyme that functions in the metabolism of living cells. These enzymes can utilize the cell's own energy, and thereby enable hydrogen gas to be produced from solar energy. (2018-10-04)

Exploiting the placebo effect can improve recovery of heart surgery patients
Exploiting the placebo effect significantly improved the recovery of patients undergoing heart surgery according to new research published in the open access journal BMC Medicine. (2017-01-09)

Your brain reveals who your friends are
You may perceive the world the way your friends do, according to a Dartmouth study finding that friends have similar neural responses to real-world stimuli and these similarities can be used to predict who your friends are. (2018-01-30)

UTIA student fellows to tackle sustainable agriculture in the Rainforest
Producing sustainable yields in harmony with conserving the rainforest: a win-win for the people of Belize and the world. As part of the highly competitive Agriculture and Food Research Initiative, faculty with the University of Tennessee Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources and the UTIA Office of International Programs will recruit 14 undergraduate Research and Extension Fellows over three years to explore agro-ecological farming. (2017-03-22)

Nostalgia safeguards against negative feelings
Psychologists discover strong correlations between Americans' glorification of their country, nostalgia for the past, and the rejection of collective guilt regarding past crimes. (2018-02-07)

Unexpected regulation of transcription factors critical to development
A team of developmental biologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst led by Dominique Alfandari, with others at MIT, report in a new paper that they have for the first time described how two transcription factors that are 'absolutely essential for human development' are regulated by a cell surface metalloprotease known as ADAM13. The discovery adds to knowledge of how cells migrate in vertebrate embryos, how stem cells differentiate and how cancer cells metastasize. (2017-10-10)

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