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Children less likely to come to the rescue when others are available
Children as young as 5 years old are less likely to help a person in need when other children are present and available to help, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (2015-03-24)

For city kids with asthma, telemedicine and in-school care cut ER visits in half
Urban children with asthma who received a combination of telemedicine support and school-based medication therapy were less than half as likely to need an emergency room or hospital visit for their asthma. (2018-01-09)

Beyond graphene: Advances make reduced graphene oxide electronics feasible
Researchers have developed a technique for converting positively charged (p-type) reduced graphene oxide (rGO) into negatively charged (n-type) rGO, creating a layered material that can be used to develop rGO-based transistors for use in electronic devices. (2017-03-30)

Don't sweat it: Bikram yoga is no more effective than yoga practiced at room temperature
Bikram yoga, a hot yoga style, is no more effective at improving health than the same yoga postures at room temperature -- that's what research published in Experimental Physiology and carried out by Texas State University and the University of Texas at Austin, USA, has found. (2018-01-18)

New statistics reveal the shape of plastic surgery
The American Society of Plastic Surgeons released new data which shows continued growth in cosmetic procedures over the last year. (2018-03-01)

New 3-D technology improving patient care for complex kidney surgeries
Surgeons use unique 3-D solution to prepare for complex surgery that includes a glasses-free 3-D monitor in the operating room that allows them to navigate patient's atypical anatomy. (2017-03-09)

Hold-up in ventures for technology transfer
The transfer of technology brings ideas closer to commercialization. The transformation happens in several steps, such as invention, innovation, building prototypes, production, market introduction, market expansion, after sales services. In each step, the owners with the technical know-how (the entrepreneur) and the owner of resources such as capital and command over networks (the investor) cooperate. (2017-03-13)

New technology detects COPD in minutes
Pioneering research by Professor Paul Lewis of Swansea University's Medical School into one of the most common lung diseases in the UK, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, has led to the development of a new technology that can quickly and easily diagnose and monitor the condition. (2016-11-17)

Room-temperature multiferroic thin films and their properties
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tohoku University have developed high-quality GFO epitaxial films and systematically investigated their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. They also demonstrated the room-temperature magnetocapacitance effects of these GFO thin films. (2018-01-05)

The scientists from MSU developed a basis for highly sensitive gas sensors
A team from the Faculty of Physics of Lomonosov Moscow State University suggested using porous silicon nanowire arrays in highly sensitive gas sensors. These devices will be able to detect the presence of toxic and non-toxic gas molecules in the air at room temperature. The results of the study were published in Physica Status Solidi A: Applications and Materials Science journal. (2017-12-26)

Baby sleeping in same room associated with less sleep, unsafe sleep habits
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends parents keep babies in the same room with them to sleep for the first year to prevent sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). But room sharing between babies and mothers beyond the first four months is associated with less sleep for babies and unsafe sleeping practices that the AAP is hoping to prevent, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. (2017-06-05)

Conservation hindered by geographical mismatches between capacity and need
New research suggests that geographical mismatches between conservation needs and expertise may hinder global conservation goals. (2017-08-30)

New roles for clinicians in the age of artificial intelligence
New Roles for Clinicians in the Age of Artificial Intelligence https://doi.org/10.15212/bioi-2020-0014 Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this opinion article the authors Fengyi Zeng, Xiaowen Liang and Zhiyi Chen from The Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China consider new roles for clinicians in the age of artificial intelligence (AI). (2020-09-18)

Some patients stop needing antidepressant medication after having plastic surgery
It has been proven that plastic surgery can improve self-esteem, but can it also act as a natural mood enhancer? A significant number of patients stopped taking antidepressant medication after undergoing plastic surgery, according to a study presented today at the American Society of Plastic Surgeons Plastic Surgery 2006 conference in San Francisco. (2006-10-08)

To prevent cyberattacks, agency similar to National Transportation Safety Board suggested
After arguably the worst year ever for cyberattacks and data breaches, Indiana University research suggests it may be time to create an independent cybersecurity agency board comparable in approach to the National Transportation Safety Board that investigates airplane crashes and train derailments. (2018-02-13)

Try togetherness: Study promotes cooperative weed management to curb herbicide resistance
In the fight against herbicide resistance, farmers are working with a shrinking toolkit. Waterhemp, a weedy nemesis of corn and soybean farmers, has developed resistance to multiple herbicide modes of action, often in the same plant. Even farmers using the latest recommendations for tank mixtures are fighting an uphill battle, with long-distance movement of pollen and seeds bringing the potential for new types of resistance into their fields each year. (2018-06-04)

Experts call for World Health Organization to rethink 'unacceptable' plans
The World Health Organization (WHO) has been accused of 'washing its hands of older people' in its proposed priorities for future work. In a letter published online in The Lancet, experts on ageing from the University of East Anglia (UEA) and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) say the draft WHO 13th General Programme of Work makes no reference to older people or to conditions associated with later life, such as dementia. (2018-01-04)

Children with medical emergencies during airline flights have limited aid
Children afflicted with medical emergencies during commercial airline trips tend to have common ailments such as vomiting, fever or allergic reactions -- events that should be easily treated, according to a study led by Duke Health researchers. But few airlines stock first-aid kits with pediatric versions of therapies that would help, including liquid forms of pain relievers or allergy medications. (2019-07-25)

Scientists discover a link between superconductivity and the periodic table
Scientists from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and Skoltech have discovered a general principle for calculating the superconductivity of hydrides based on the periodic table alone. Turned out that certain elements capable of forming superconducting compounds are arranged in a specific pattern in the periodic table. (2018-04-10)

Cheops' pyramid: Is there an iron throne in the newly discovered chamber?
A recent exploration has shown the presence of a significant void in the pyramid of Khufu at Giza. A possible explanation of this space, interpreted as a chamber connected to the lower north channel and aimed to contain a specific funerary equipment is tentatively proposed. According to the Pyramid Texts, this equipment might consist of a Iron throne, actually a wooden throne endowed with meteoritic Iron sheets. (2018-01-11)

Asymmetric sound absorption lets in the light
Many asymmetric absorbers are currently based on a single-port system, where sound enters one side and is absorbed before a rigid wall. In this design, however, light and air are unable to pass through the system. But new research shows that asymmetric absorption can be realized within a straight transparent waveguide. The waveguide allows light transmission and air flow through the absorber, and is described this week in Applied Physics Letters. (2017-10-06)

Dogs share food with other dogs even in complex situations
Dogs also share their food, albeit mainly with four-legged friends rather than strangers. A new study conducted by behavioral biologists from the Messerli Research Institute at Vetmeduni Vienna has now confirmed this prosocial behavior among canines. The more complex methodology of the study, however, showed that the experimental set-up has an impact on the dogs' behavior and that even the mere presence of another dog makes the animals more generous. (2017-01-27)

Preliminary evidence for use of board games to improve knowledge in health outcomes
Board games can engage patients in play and fantasy, and by enabling face-to-face interaction, can help educate patients on health-related knowledge and behaviors. (2018-10-22)

Study reveals growing severity of US firearm injuries requiring hospital admission since early 90s
New data published in the journal Trauma Surgery & Acute Care Open today show an annual increase in severity of non-fatal firearm injuries needing hospital admission across the United States since the early 1990s. (2018-02-28)

Link shown between thunderstorms and asthma attacks in metro Atlanta area
In the first in-depth study of its kind ever done in the Southeastern United States, researchers at the University of Georgia and Emory University have discovered a link between thunderstorms and asthma attacks in the metro Atlanta area that could have a (2008-07-10)

Meeting with OBGYN prior to first exam empowers young women in medical settings
A new national survey by Orlando Health found that nearly 40 percent of women were at least somewhat concerned about what would happen during their first OBGYN exam. That's why experts at Orlando Health are encouraging girls and their parents to speak with their OBGYN in a non-clinical setting before their first exam. (2018-05-14)

Lobachevsky University researchers obtain magnetic semiconductor layers of a new type
Researchers at the laboratory of spin and optical electronics of the Lobachevsky University (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia) have obtained a new type of magnetic semiconductor layers, which demonstrate spin-dependent phenomena in the transport of charge carriers at room temperature. (2018-01-22)

Tiny infrared laser holds promise as weapon against terror
Northwestern University researchers have demonstrated a specialized laser that holds promise as a weapon of defense in civilian and military applications. They became the first to create a quantum cascade laser that can operate continuously at high power and at room temperature with an emission wavelength of 9.5 microns and a light output greater than 100 milliwatts. Once optimized, the tiny laser could be used for the early detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents. (2005-08-05)

Separating septic and aseptic operating areas is unnecessary
In Germany, the rule still applies that aseptic and septic and procedure rooms need to be separate; Julian Camill Harnoss and coauthors show that this separation is unnecessary, in the current issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International (Dtsch Arztebl Int 2017; 114: 465-72). (2017-09-08)

Rutgers physicists create new class of 2D artificial materials
In 1965, a renowned Princeton University physicist theorized that ferroelectric metals could conduct electricity despite not existing in nature. For decades, scientists thought it would be impossible to prove the theory by Philip W. Anderson, who shared the 1977 Nobel Prize in physics. It was like trying to blend fire and water, but a Rutgers-led international team of scientists has verified the theory and their findings are published online in Nature Communications. (2018-06-11)

The 'Batman' in hydrogen fuel cells
In a study published in Nature on Jan. 31, researchers at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) report advances in the development of hydrogen fuel cells that could increase its application in vehicles, especially in extreme temperatures like cold winters. (2019-01-30)

Stroke recovery improved by sensory deprivation, mouse study shows
Mice that had experienced strokes were more likely to recover the ability to use a front paw if their whiskers were clipped following a stroke. Trimming the whiskers deprives an area of the mouse's brain from receiving sensory signals from the animals' whiskers. And it leaves that area of the brain more plastic -- or receptive to rewiring to take on new tasks. (2018-01-31)

How to induce magnetism in graphene
Graphene, a two-dimensional structure made of carbon, is a material with excellent mechani-cal, electronic and optical properties. However, it did not seem suitable for magnetic applica-tions. Together with international partners, Empa researchers have now succeeded in synthesiz-ing a unique nanographene predicted in the 1970s, which conclusively demonstrates that car-bon in very specific forms has magnetic properties that could permit future spintronic applica-tions. The results have just been published in the renowned journal Nature Nanotechnology. (2019-12-10)

American Federation for Aging Research experts featured in PBS special: Incredible Aging
Fourteen AFAR experts are among those featured in (2018-03-14)

Mangos help promote gut health
Eating mangos found to be more effective in relieving constipation and reducing intestinal inflammation than comparable amount of fiber. (2018-06-06)

Nanoscale pillars as a building block for future information technology
Researchers from Linköping University and the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden propose a new device concept that can efficiently transfer the information carried by electron spin to light at room temperature -- a stepping stone towards future information technology. They present their approach in an article in Nature Communications. (2018-10-05)

Secondhand marijuana smoke causes asthma symptoms in child allergic to cannabis
New research shows it's possible for both children and adults with uncontrolled asthma to find their symptoms worsening due to cannabis allergy and exposure to marijuana smoke. (2018-11-16)

Has physics ever been deterministic?
Researchers from the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the University of Vienna and the University of Geneva, have proposed a new interpretation of classical physics without real numbers. This new study challenges the traditional view of classical physics as deterministic. (2019-12-09)

Brain can navigate based solely on smells
Northwestern University researchers have developed a new 'smell virtual landscape' that enables the study of how smells engage the brain's navigation system. The work demonstrates, for the first time, that the mammalian brain can form a map of its surroundings based solely on smells. (2018-02-26)

Virtual reality videos may help alleviate pre-surgical anxiety in children
A virtual reality tour of the operating room prior to anesthesia helped reduce preoperative anxiety in children scheduled to undergo surgery who took part in a clinical trial published in the BJS (British Journal of Surgery). (2017-10-04)

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