Popular Aggression News and Current Events

Popular Aggression News and Current Events, Aggression News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 998 Results
Brain scans show why people get aggressive after a drink or two
Researchers have used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans that measure blood flow in the brain to better understand why people often become aggressive and violent after drinking alcohol. After only two drinks, the researchers noted changes in the working of the prefrontal cortex of the brain, the part normally involved in tempering a person's levels of aggression. (2018-02-12)

No evidence to support link between violent video games and behaviour
Researchers at the University of York have found no evidence to support the theory that video games make players more violent. (2018-01-16)

Climate change increases potential for conflict and violence
Images of extensive flooding or fire-ravaged communities help us see how climate change is accelerating the severity of natural disasters. Iowa State researchers say what is not as clear is the indirect effect of these disasters and rapid climate change on violence and aggression. They have identified three ways climate change will increase the likelihood of violence. (2019-02-13)

The bacterial 'Game of Thrones'
Much like animals and to a degree humans, bacteria enjoy a good fight. While their aggressive characteristics are broadly known, their approach to conflict is less understood. In research published in Current Biology, researchers at the University of Oxford have shed light on this area of bacterial behavior, revealing that they approach conflict in much the same way as a human platoon, responding to a threat with a coordinated, collective retaliation. (2018-01-25)

Study finds troubling consequences for anti-Muslim and anti-Mexican attitudes and actions
In a study conducted during the 2016 US Republican Primaries, researchers from Penn and Northwestern found that Americans hold dehumanizing views of Muslims and Mexican immigrants, and as a result of feeling dehumanized, these groups become more likely to favor violent action over nonviolent and are less likely to assist with counterterrorism. (2017-02-06)

Bonobos share and share alike
Bonobos are willing to share meat with animals outside their own family groups. This behavior was observed in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and is documented in a new study in Springer's journal Human Nature. (2018-04-05)

Childhood aggression linked to deficits in executive function
Researchers find that primary school children with reduced cognitive skills for planning and self-restraint are more likely to show increased aggression in middle childhood. The study examined the relationship between aggression and executive function -- a measure of cognitive skills that allow a person to achieve goals by controlling their behavior. The results suggest that helping children to increase their executive function could reduce their aggression. (2018-03-15)

Get better customer service by choosing your words wisely
The next time you make a complaint to your cellphone or cable company, don't get personal. (2016-12-12)

Callous and unemotional traits show in brain structure of boys only
Callous-unemotional traits are linked to differences in brain structure in boys, but not girls. This reports a European research team led by the University of Basel and University of Basel Psychiatric Hospital in a study on brain development in 189 adolescents. The journal Neuroimage: Clinical has published the results. (2017-12-27)

Chance is a factor in the survival of species
In a major study, biologists at Lund University in Sweden have studied the role of chance in whether a species survives or dies out locally. One possible consequence according to the researchers, is that although conservation initiatives can save endangered species, sometimes chance can override such efforts. (2018-03-26)

Sex and aggression controlled separately in female animal brains, but overlap in male brains
Brain structures that control sexual and aggressive behavior in mice are wired differently in females than in males. (2017-09-18)

Direct link between sexual objectification of girls and aggression towards them
There is a direct relation between the sexual objectification of girls and aggression towards them, research by psychologists at the University of Kent has shown. (2017-01-24)

New study links brain stem volume and aggression in autism
New research from autism experts is providing clues into the link between aggression and autism -- clues the team hopes will eventually lead to more effective intervention. (2017-02-09)

These ring-tailed lemurs raise a 'stink' when they flirt with potential mates
Stink-flirting among ring-tailed lemurs come at a cost, but may also influence females in choosing a mate. (2017-11-17)

The neural circuitry of parental behavior
HHMI scientists have deconstructed the brain circuits that control parenting behavior in mice, and identified discrete sets of cells that control actions, motivations, and hormonal changes involved in nurturing young animals. (2018-04-11)

Violent video games found not to affect empathy
The link between playing violent video games and antisocial behavior, such as increased aggression and decreased empathy, is hotly debated. In a recent study published in Frontiers in Psychology, the long-term effects of playing violent video games were investigated. This study found that empathy is not blunted by playing such games long-term. (2017-03-08)

Meditation has limited role in making you a better person, says study
New research has suggested meditation's role in making individuals better people is limited. (2018-02-05)

IUPUI study links juveniles' views of police with likelihood of aggressive behavior
A new Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis study of juvenile offenders finds that when youth perceive police injustice, it affects not only how they view the justice system, but also their rates of aggression. (2017-09-21)

Does sexual aggression alter the female brain?
Thirty percent of women worldwide experience some kind of physical or sexual assault during their lifetime. In a recent animal study, Rutgers scientists -- who have developed a new model to determine how stress affects females -- discovered that prepubescent female rodents paired with sexually experienced males had elevated levels of stress hormones, could not learn as well, and expressed reduced maternal behaviors needed to care for offspring. (2016-02-19)

Youth dating violence shaped by parents' conflict-handling views, study finds
Parents who talk to their children about nonviolent ways of resolving conflict may reduce children's likelihood of physically or psychologically abusing their dating partners later - even when parents give contradictory messages indicating that violence is acceptable in certain circumstances, University of Illinois social work professor Rachel Garthe found. (2018-11-16)

Two behaviors linked to high school dropout rates
The factors that may lead to a student's decision to leave school are complex, but a new study from the University of Georgia sheds light on how two behaviors -- aggression and weak study skills -- contribute to the problem. (2018-03-12)

Study: Infamous 'death roll' almost universal among crocodile species
The iconic 'death roll' of alligators and crocodiles may be more common among species than previously believed, according to a new study published in Ethology, Ecology & Evolution and coauthored by a researcher at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (2019-04-18)

Why is impulsive aggression in children so difficult to treat?
Maladaptive and impulsive aggression is explosive, triggered by routine environmental cues, and intended to harm another person, making it a significant challenge for clinicians, family members, and others who interact with affected children and adolescents. Efforts to develop effective treatments would benefit from better descriptive and quantitative methods to characterize this disorder, as described in an article (http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/cap.2015.0204) published in the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology. (2016-02-23)

A gene that increases the risk of pancreatic cancer controls inflammation in normal tissue
A group of researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre has now discovered an unexpected link between the two processes: in the pancreas, one of the genes that increases the risk of developing pancreatic cancer also controls inflammation. This finding offers 'a major conceptual change,' explains Paco Real, from the CNIO, which, as well as helping to understand the origin of tumors, suggests new strategies to improve the prevention of pancreatic cancer. (2018-02-14)

80-year-olds as street-savvy as 18-year-olds
Our gut instinct about whether a stranger poses a threat is as good when we're 80 as when we're 18, according to new research. Older people are as good as young adults at knowing when someone is potentially aggressive, and being streetwise appears to be a skill honed in childhood but not fully reliable until adulthood. (2017-08-28)

Aggression neurons identified
High activity in a relatively poorly studied group of brain cells can be linked to aggressive behaviour in mice, a new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows. Using optogenetic techniques, the researchers were able to control aggression in mice by stimulating or inhibiting these cells. The results, which are published in the scientific journal Nature Neuroscience, contribute to a new understanding of the biological mechanisms behind aggressive behaviour. (2018-05-25)

Bullying likely to result in aggressive responses by children with disabilities
A new study from the University of Missouri has found that children with disabilities are more likely to respond aggressively when they are bullied, not only to their bullies but to other children as well. This aggressive response often results in these children being labelled as bullies themselves, when that is not an accurate assessment of their behavior. (2016-10-03)

Psychedelic drug use associated with reduced partner violence in men
In a new study published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, researchers from UBC's Okanagan campus have discovered that men who have used psychedelic drugs in the past have a lower likelihood of engaging in violence against their intimate partners. (2018-06-05)

Looking stressed can help keep the peace
This is the first research to suggest scratching may have evolved as a communication tool to help social cohesion. (2017-09-11)

Behavioral disorders in kids with autism linked to reduced brain connectivity
More than a quarter of children with autism spectrum disorder are also diagnosed with disruptive behavior disorders. For the first time, Yale researchers have identified a possible biological cause: a key mechanism that regulates emotion functions differently in the brains of the children who exhibit disruptive behavior. (2019-04-18)

Transsexual people are frequently victims of aggression and discrimination
The process of gender reassignment in transsexual individuals is complex. A new study analyses the characteristics of this collective as well as the psychological adjustment they must undergo during the process. Of the sample studied, 81.75 percent suffered from some type of physical aggression during their lifetime, 31.16 percent perceived discrimination in the workplace and 22.84 percent attempted suicide at least once. (2016-05-18)

Orangutans: Lethal aggression between females
Researchers have for the first time witnessed the death of a female orangutan at the hands of another female. Even more extraordinary is that the perpetrator recruited a male orangutan as a hired gun to help her corner and attack the victim. Before this observation, lethal fights between females had never been observed in orangutans. The study led by Anna Marzec of the University of Zurich appears in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. (2016-02-03)

Daily dose of violent video games has no long-term effect on adult aggression
Playing violent action adventure games for prolonged periods does not make adults more aggressive say researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and the University Clinic Hamburg-Eppendorf in Germany. A new study led by Simone Kühn looked at the influence long-term violent video game play has on aggression levels, and compared this with playing a life simulation game or not playing a video game at all. The research is published in the Springer Nature journal Molecular Psychiatry. (2018-03-14)

Chimpanzees start using a new tool-use gesture during an alpha male take over
Similar to humans, non-human primates combine gestures, facial expressions, and vocalizations in various ways to communicate effectively. Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology investigated one such signal, the 'leaf clip' gesture, which re-emerged in a wild chimpanzee group during an alpha takeover. Importantly, the gesture was produced only by adult male chimpanzees, immediately preceded their pant hoot vocalizations and was associated with acoustic changes in those calls. (2018-06-28)

Adult chimpanzees play more than adult lowland gorillas in captivity
Play is more frequent in captive adult chimpanzees than in captive adult lowland gorillas, according to a study published March 7, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Giada Cordoni and Elisabetta Palagi from Univerity of Pisa in collaboration with Ivan Norscia from University of Turin. (2018-03-07)

Asthma medication may have psychiatric side effects
In a Pharmacology Research & Perspectives study, the asthma medication montelukast (trade name Singulair) was linked with neuropsychiatric reactions such as depression and aggression, with nightmares being especially frequent in children. (2017-09-18)

Hostility towards minorities can be contagious
If people act hostile towards other ethnic groups, they easily find imitators. (2018-05-09)

Stereotypes of romantic love may justify gender-based violence
The media have become key agents of socialization in the construction of teenagers' and young people's identities. In particular, media representations of sexuality and love become informal educational agents of the first order on these issues. (2019-02-13)

One way social isolation changes the mouse brain
Social isolation is an intensely stressful environment for mice. When animals are stressed, they generally become much more reactive to a variety of negative stimulants, and these reactions or behaviors persist longer than in non-stressed animals. In a paper published May 17 in the journal Cell, scientists present what they believe is one of the mechanisms by which chronic social isolation in mice causes the brain to change in a profound way. (2018-05-17)

Children and adolescents in high-risk environments more likely to become violent adults
Children and adolescents who grow up with one or more of these environmental risk factors are likely to resort to violence, aggression and crime as adults, irrespective of an underlying mental illness. This is according to a new study in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, which is published by Springer Nature (2018-05-24)

Page 1 of 25 | 998 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.