Popular Agricultural News and Current Events

Popular Agricultural News and Current Events, Agricultural News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Sustainable but smartly: Tackling security and privacy issues in smart agriculture
Smart agriculture is set to revolutionize food production in the next few decades. However, the integration of information technology in agricultural processes also brings security and privacy concerns. In a new survey published in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica, scientists discuss these challenges and propose countermeasures applicable to different areas of agricultural production. They also provide guidance for future research, suggesting key areas of focus in the ever-growing field of smart agriculture. (2021-02-23)

New pathways for sustainable agriculture
Diversity beats monotony: a colourful patchwork of small, differently used plots can bring advantages to agriculture and nature. This is the result of a new study by the University of Würzburg. (2019-04-08)

Global agriculture: Impending threats to biodiversity
A new study compares the effects of expansion vs. intensification of cropland use on global agricultural markets and biodiversity, and finds that the expansion strategy poses a particularly serious threat to biodiversity in the tropics. (2019-06-28)

Wait-and-see strategy pays off, incentives needed for risk takers
Some people are quick to purchase the latest technology or sign up for a new service. Others adopt a wait-and-see strategy. A recent study by University of Illinois economist Hope Michelson, finds this is true for farmers in Nicaragua who enter into contracts with Walmart. (2017-09-18)

Agricultural science helping farmers reduce greenhouse gas
With greenhouse gas reduction increasingly on the public agenda, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada researchers say agricultural science may be part of the solution. (2002-12-17)

New effort to promote careers in agriculture, natural resources
A new round of grants from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture is designed to promote careers in agriculture and natural resource management, and educators with the University of Tennessee Departments of Plant Sciences and Agricultural Leadership, Education, and Communications (ALEC) are among the grant recipients. (2016-12-19)

Investing in public education earns high marks for greater upward mobility
Investing in education may help boost economic opportunities for the next generation, according to a team of economists. (2018-03-28)

Grassland plants react unexpectedly to high levels of carbon dioxide
Plants are responding in unexpected ways to increased carbon dioxide in the air, according to a 20-year study conducted by researchers at the University of Minnesota. (2018-04-20)

Agricultural sustainability project reached 20.9 million smallholder farmers across China
An effort to improve crop yields and reduce fertilizer use applied top-down and bottom-up approaches to reach 20 million smallholder farmers across China. (2018-03-09)

Scientists succeed at growing noroviruses in human intestinal cell cultures in the lab
The USDA's National Institute of Food and Agriculture supports NoroCORE, a multidisciplinary research collaborative of 30 researchers from 25 universities who are joining forces to understand and control foodborne virus risks. (2016-08-26)

To maximize sugarcane harvesting, use the right blade
You wouldn't use the same knife to cut through a thick steak as you would to slice an angel food cake, right? Although that may be a ridiculous comparison, the same principle holds true when harvesting various crops. One blade doesn't slice all. Researchers at the University of Illinois tested four blades to find the one that most efficiently cuts sugarcane. (2018-01-17)

Bottle gourd genome provides insight on evolutionary history, relationships of cucurbits
Researchers from the Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI), the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), and collaborators in China and France have produced the first high-quality genome sequence for the bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) and a reconstructed genome of the most recent Cucurbitaceae ancestor. (2017-12-01)

Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History reveals ants as fungus farmers
It turns out ants, like humans, are true farmers. The difference is that ants are farming fungus. Entomologists Ted Schultz and Seán Brady at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History have published a paper in the March 24 issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, providing new insight into the agricultural abilities of ants and how these abilities have evolved throughout time. (2008-03-24)

Worldwide importance of honey bees for natural habitats captured in new report
An unprecedented study integrating data from around the globe has shown that honey bees are the world's most important single species of pollinator in natural ecosystems and a key contributor to natural ecosystem functions. The report weaves together information from 80 plant-pollinator interaction networks. The results clearly identify the honey bee (Apis mellifera) as the single most frequent visitor to flowers of naturally occurring (non-crop) plants worldwide. (2018-01-10)

Professor publishes archaeological research on social inequality
The origins of social inequality might lie in the remnants of ancient Eurasia's agricultural societies, according to an article recently published in the major science journal Nature. (2017-11-17)

Unexpected agricultural production allowed pre-Hispanic society to flourish in arid Andes
Archaeological remains found in southern Bolivia reveal a flourishing agrarian society from the 13th to the 15th centuries, despite marked drying and cooling of the climate throughout the period. This unexpected observation is the result of an interdisciplinary study conducted by an international team (CONICET, CNRS, IRD and UCSD). This research, published in Science Advances, highlights the adaptive capacity and resilience of societies with little hierarchical differentiation, in confronting the challenges of climate degradation. (2017-12-20)

UTIA research examines long-term economic impact of cover crops
A team of researchers from the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture examined data from the past 29 years to determine whether it is profitable to include cover crops in an erosion management strategy. They found that while cover crops can cut into profitability over the short term, there are a number of benefits over long-term adoption. (2018-02-05)

Study examines pesticides' impact on wood frogs
A new study looks at how neonicotinoid pesticides affect wood frogs, which use surface waters in agricultural environments to breed and reproduce. Neonicotinoids are widely used insecticides that are applied to a variety of crops and are relatively persistent in the environment. (2017-03-01)

Key plant species may be important for supporting wildflower pollinators
Increased agricultural production has likely led to loss, fragmentation, and degradation of flower-rich habitats for pollinators. To counteract these negative effects of modern agricultural practices, efforts to maintain and restore diverse plants in agricultural landscapes -- called agri-environmental schemes (AES) -- have been implemented in numerous European countries. (2017-10-05)

Wildfires set to increase: Could we be sitting on a tinderbox in Europe?
Scientists at the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, modelled fire danger for several weather and climate scenarios in Europe up to the year 2100. (2018-03-07)

Global scientific review reveals effective alternatives to neonicotinoid and fipronil insecticides
Use of controversial neonicotinoid insecticides ('neonics') in agriculture is not as effective as once thought, and can be replaced by advantageous pest-management alternatives, according to a study published today in the Springer journal Environmental Science and Pollution Research. (2018-02-26)

Early-killed rye shows promise in edamame
With the rise of herbicide-resistant weeds in most grain and vegetable crops, farmers are looking for alternatives to herbicides to control weeds. Cover crops offer one potential weed management tool. Their use in specialty crops is limited, and no testing has been done so far in edamame. However, a new University of Illinois study reports that early-killed cereal rye shows promise for edamame growers. (2018-03-08)

Agricultural productivity drove Euro-American settlement of Utah
Utah anthropologists adapted a well-known ecological model, and tested its predictions by combining satellite-derived measures of agricultural suitability with historical census data. They found that the model accurately predicted the patterns in which settlement occurred in Utah, as well as the present-day distribution of people. (2017-11-03)

Corn yield modeling towards sustainable agriculture
Researchers use a 16 year field-experiment dataset to show the ability of a model to fine-tune optimal nitrogen fertilizer rates, and identify five ways it can inform nitrogen management guidelines. Finding the optimal N fertilizer rate is notoriously complex and yet vital to keep profits high and environmental impact low. The work, published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Plant Science is relevant to future food security and sustainable farming methods. (2016-12-14)

Tennessee researchers join call for responsible development of synthetic biology
Engineering biology is transforming technology and science. Researchers in the international Genome Project-write, including two authors from the UTIA Center for Agricultural Synthetic Biology, outline the technological advances needed to secure a safe, responsible future in the Oct. 18 issue of Science. (2019-10-17)

Organic fertilizers are an overlooked source of microplastic pollution
Organic fertilizers from biowaste fermentation act as a vehicle for microplastic particles to enter the terrestrial environment, with the amount of microplastic particles differing based on pre-treatment methods and plant type, a new study shows. (2018-04-04)

Background radiation in UAE's agricultural topsoil found to be lower than global average
The first civilian nuclear power plant in the Eastern Region of Arabian Desert, and specifically in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), will be operating four reactors between (2018- 2020). Before the construction of any regulated nuclear facility, it is essential to investigate the environmental background radiation level in the country. This study determines the primordial radionuclides concentrations obtained from 145 soil samples collected from multiple agriculture farms in the UAE. (2018-03-13)

Insect toxin detected in the world's longest animal
The longest animal in the world, the bootlace worm, which can be up to 55 metres long, produces neurotoxins that can kill both crabs and cockroaches. This has been shown in a new study conducted by researchers at Uppsala University, Linnaeus University and the Swedish Species Information Centre at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. The study was published in Scientific Reports, March 22. The toxins could be used for example in agricultural insecticides. (2018-03-26)

Why malaria mosquitoes like people with malaria
Malaria mosquitoes prefer to feed -- and feed more -- on blood from people infected with malaria. Researchers from Stockholm University, the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences and KTH Royal Institute of Technology have discovered why. The findings can lead to new ways to fight malaria without using poisonous chemicals. The results will be published in the next issue of the journal Science. (2017-02-09)

How does agriculture affect vulnerable insect-eating birds?
Aerial insectivores -- birds that hunt for insect prey on the wing -- are declining across North America as agricultural intensification leads to diminishing insect abundance and diversity in many areas. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications looks at how tree swallows' diets are affected by agriculture and finds that while birds living in cropland can still find their preferred prey, they may be working harder to get it. (2018-08-29)

Wintering warblers choose agriculture over forest
Effective conservation for long-distance migrants requires knowing what's going on with them year-round -- not just when they're in North America during the breeding season. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications uncovers yellow warblers' surprising habitat preferences in their winter home in Mexico and raises questions about what their use of agricultural habitat could mean for their future. (2018-05-02)

Research could improve management of conflict between wildlife and farmers across the globe
A new study led by the University of Stirling highlights improvements in the way conflicts between wildlife conservation and farming are managed worldwide. (2018-03-12)

Not all milkweed is equal for egg-laying monarchs, U of G study reveals
Milkweed plants in agricultural areas have 3 1/2 times more monarch butterfly eggs than milkweed growing in urban gardens, natural areas and roadsides, according to a new University of Guelph study. The researchers also found monarchs prefer small patches of the plant to larger ones. These findings have implications for current initiatives underway that involve planting milkweed to help the survival of this endangered butterfly. (2017-11-09)

University of Minnesota study shows wetlands provide landscape-scale reduction in nitrate pollution
A study by University of Minnesota researchers provides new insights to demonstrate that multiple wetlands or 'wetland complexes' within a watershed are extremely effective at reducing harmful nitrate in rivers and streams. (2018-01-31)

Illinois River water quality improvement linked to more efficient corn production
In a new University of Illinois study, nitrate concentrations and loads in the Illinois River from 1983 to 2014 were correlated with agricultural nitrogen use efficiency and nitrate discharged from Chicago's treated wastewater. The amount of nitrate that flowed down the river each year from 2010 to 2014 was 10 percent less than the average amount during a baseline period of 1980 to 1996. This reduction is a positive step toward the ultimate goal to reduce nitrate concentrations by 45 percent. (2016-05-10)

Sowing strips of flowering plants has limited effect on pollination
Many pollinating insects benefit from a small-scale agricultural landscape with pastures, meadows and other unploughed environments. In landscapes dominated by arable land, they lack both food and nesting places. Sown flower strips can increase the availability of food for pollinating insects, and are therefore assumed to benefit pollination. However, new research from Lund University in Sweden shows that the effect of the sown flower strips on pollination is limited and cannot compensate for the advantages of a varied landscape. (2018-04-06)

Scientists say agriculture is good for honey bees
Scientists with the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture evaluated the impacts of row-crop agriculture, including the traditional use of pesticides, on honey bee health. Results indicated hive health was positively correlated to the presence of agriculture. According to the study, colonies in a non-agricultural area struggled to find adequate food and produced fewer offspring. The findings suggest that the benefits of better nutrition in agricultural areas outweigh the risks of exposure to agricultural pesticides. (2017-05-02)

Potato waste processing may be the road to enhanced food waste conversion
With more than two dozen companies in Pennsylvania manufacturing potato chips, it is no wonder that researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences have developed a novel approach to more efficiently convert potato waste into ethanol. This process may lead to reduced production costs for biofuel in the future and add extra value for chip makers. (2017-08-17)

Butterflies thrive in grasslands surrounded by forest
For pollinating butterflies, it is more important to be close to forests than to agricultural fields, according to a study of 32,000 butterflies by researchers at Linköping University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences in Uppsala. The results provide important knowledge about how to plan and manage the landscape to ensure the survival of butterflies. (2019-02-01)

Corn better used as food than biofuel, study finds
Corn is grown not only for food, it is also an important renewable energy source. Renewable biofuels can come with hidden economic and environmental issues, and the question of whether corn is better utilized as food or as a biofuel has persisted since ethanol came into use. For the first time, researchers at the University of Illinois have quantified and compared these issues in terms of economics of the entire production system to determine if the benefits of biofuel corn outweigh the costs. (2017-06-20)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.