Popular Agriculture News and Current Events

Popular Agriculture News and Current Events, Agriculture News Articles.
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Meet the tenrecs
Researchers reviewed the conservation priorities for the 31 species of tenrec -- a poorly understood family of small mammals superficially resembling hedgehogs, found only on the island of Madagascar. (2019-05-16)

Sustainable but smartly: Tackling security and privacy issues in smart agriculture
Smart agriculture is set to revolutionize food production in the next few decades. However, the integration of information technology in agricultural processes also brings security and privacy concerns. In a new survey published in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica, scientists discuss these challenges and propose countermeasures applicable to different areas of agricultural production. They also provide guidance for future research, suggesting key areas of focus in the ever-growing field of smart agriculture. (2021-02-23)

Palm oil not the only driver of forest loss in Indonesia
Large-scale agriculture, primarily for growing oil palms, remains a major cause of deforestation in Indonesia but its impact has diminished in recent years as other natural and human causes emerge, a Duke University study finds. These causes, which vary by location and over time, include the conversion of forests to grasslands by El Niño-fueled wildfires; small-scale farming; and mining. Policymakers and conservationists need to address these varied causes when devising new programs and practices. (2019-02-01)

Electrical enhancement: Engineers speed up electrons in semiconductors
Researchers from Graduate School of Bio-Applications and Systems Engineering at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) have sped up the movement of electrons in organic semiconductor films by two to three orders of magnitude. The speedier electronics could lead to improved solar power and transistor use across the world, according to the scientists. (2018-10-17)

New pathways for sustainable agriculture
Diversity beats monotony: a colourful patchwork of small, differently used plots can bring advantages to agriculture and nature. This is the result of a new study by the University of Würzburg. (2019-04-08)

For some US counties, climate change will be particularly costly
A highly granular assessment of the impacts of climate change on the US economy suggests that each 1°Celsius increase in temperature will cost 1.2 percent of the country's gross domestic product, on average. (2017-06-29)

How bees live with bacteria
More than 90 percent of all bee species are not organized in colonies, but fight their way through life alone. They are also threatened. Scientists from Würzburg demand more research on the ecology of these insects. (2019-08-27)

After cooking, biofortified corn and eggs retain nutrient needed to prevent blindness
Fortified and biofortified foods are at the forefront of efforts to combat vitamin A deficiency worldwide. But little is known about what influence processing may have on the retention of vitamin A precursors in these foods. Now in a study appearing in ACS Omega, scientists report that a high percentage of these healthful substances -- in some cases, almost all -- can survive cooking, depending on the preparation method.  (2017-11-15)

Agricultural science helping farmers reduce greenhouse gas
With greenhouse gas reduction increasingly on the public agenda, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada researchers say agricultural science may be part of the solution. (2002-12-17)

Investing in public education earns high marks for greater upward mobility
Investing in education may help boost economic opportunities for the next generation, according to a team of economists. (2018-03-28)

New effort to promote careers in agriculture, natural resources
A new round of grants from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture is designed to promote careers in agriculture and natural resource management, and educators with the University of Tennessee Departments of Plant Sciences and Agricultural Leadership, Education, and Communications (ALEC) are among the grant recipients. (2016-12-19)

Monitor climate change, not predators, to protect lake diversity: Study
Climate change and other environmental factors are more threatening to fish diversity than predators, according to new research from the University of Guelph. It is a surprising and important finding, as humans rely upon freshwater lakes for more than one-fifth of their protein needs worldwide, says lead author Prof. Andrew MacDougall in U of G's Department of Integrative Biology. (2018-03-23)

How bacteria fertilize soya
Soya and clover have their very own fertiliser factories in their roots, where bacteria manufacture ammonium, which is crucial for plant growth. Although this has long been common knowledge, scientists have only recently described the mechanism in detail. With biotechnology, this knowledge could now help make agriculture more sustainable. (2020-06-03)

Deciphering the walnut genome
New research could provide a major boost to the state's growing $1.6 billion walnut industry by making it easier to breed walnut trees better equipped to combat the soil-borne pathogens that now plague many of California's 4,800 growers. (2019-03-26)

A new vision for genomics in animal agriculture
Iowa State University animal scientists helped to form a blueprint to guide the next decade of animal genomics research. The recently released document outlines research priorities that will help livestock producers meet the protein needs of a growing global population. The blueprint calls for increased emphasis on how genomics interact with production methods and environmental factors to make livestock production a predictive science. (2019-05-29)

Climate change and habitat conversion combine to homogenize nature
Climate change and habitat conversion to agriculture are working together to homogenize nature, indicates a study in the journal Global Change Biology led by the University of California, Davis. In other words, the more things change, the more they are the same. (2017-08-18)

Bacterial mechanism converts nitrogen to greenhouse gas
Cornell University researchers have discovered a biological mechanism that helps convert nitrogen-based fertilizer into nitrous oxide, an ozone-depleting greenhouse gas. (2016-12-06)

Precision agriculture for small-scale farming systems
Working closely with farmers to use the right input, at the right time, at the right place, and in the right amount can improve crop yields. (2013-10-08)

Economic concerns drive sustainability in American cities and towns
While environmental issues are often cited as a major factor in cities and towns in pursuing sustainability, a new study shows that economic concerns can be just as important to local governments in adopting concrete sustainability plans. (2016-04-25)

Scientists succeed at growing noroviruses in human intestinal cell cultures in the lab
The USDA's National Institute of Food and Agriculture supports NoroCORE, a multidisciplinary research collaborative of 30 researchers from 25 universities who are joining forces to understand and control foodborne virus risks. (2016-08-26)

Human-induced deforestation is causing an increase in malaria cases
A new study of 67 less-developed, malaria-endemic nations led by Lehigh University sociologist Dr. Kelly Austin, finds a link between deforestation and increasing malaria rates across developing nations. (2017-05-22)

Research outlines the interconnected benefits of urban agriculture
A team of researchers led by Arizona State University and Google has assessed the value of urban agriculture and quantified its benefits at global scale. They report their findings in 'A Global Geospatial Ecosystems Services Estimate of Urban Agriculture,' in the current issue of Earth's Future. (2018-01-10)

Because of agriculture, the Gulf of Mexico will suffocate for decades longer
Nitrogen runoff has created a massive oxygen-deprived 'dead zone' in the Gulf of Mexico, but even if the runoff was completely eliminated, it would still take at least 30 years for the area to recover, a new study estimates. (2018-03-22)

Bottle gourd genome provides insight on evolutionary history, relationships of cucurbits
Researchers from the Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI), the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), and collaborators in China and France have produced the first high-quality genome sequence for the bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) and a reconstructed genome of the most recent Cucurbitaceae ancestor. (2017-12-01)

'High-yield' farming costs the environment less than previously thought -- and could help spare habitats
New findings suggest that more intensive agriculture might be the 'least bad' option for feeding the world while saving its species -- provided use of such 'land-efficient' systems prevents further conversion of wilderness to farmland. (2018-09-14)

Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History reveals ants as fungus farmers
It turns out ants, like humans, are true farmers. The difference is that ants are farming fungus. Entomologists Ted Schultz and Seán Brady at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History have published a paper in the March 24 issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, providing new insight into the agricultural abilities of ants and how these abilities have evolved throughout time. (2008-03-24)

Evolutionary crop research: Ego-plants give lower yield
Evolutionary biologists are calling for a shift in the usual plant breeding paradigm, which is based on selecting the fittest plants to create new varieties. New research results show that a plants ability to be less competitive and behave according to the good of the group could be a key feature in the attempt to increase crop yields. (2017-10-02)

Farming, cheese, chewing changed human skull shape
The advent of farming, especially dairy products, had a small but significant effect on the shape of human skulls, according to a recently published study from anthropologists at UC Davis. (2017-08-24)

NAS/USDA To Celebrate 20 Years Of Competitive Research Grants In Agriculture
The U.S. Department of Agriculture and the National Academy of Sciences will celebrate 20 years of competitive research grants in agriculture, April 29, with a symposium and reception at the National Academy of Sciences. (1998-04-27)

How much soil goes down the drain -- New data on soil lost due to water
According to a new study, almost 36 billion tons of soil is lost every year due to water, and deforestation and other changes in land use make the problem worse. The study also offers ideas on how agriculture can change to become a part of the solution from being part of the problem. (2017-12-15)

UTIA research examines long-term economic impact of cover crops
A team of researchers from the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture examined data from the past 29 years to determine whether it is profitable to include cover crops in an erosion management strategy. They found that while cover crops can cut into profitability over the short term, there are a number of benefits over long-term adoption. (2018-02-05)

Study: Rural ranchers face less access to water during drought than urban counterparts
The findings highlight a rural-urban divide and show that ranchers' access to water was neither equal nor valued during the drought in Mexico's Baja California Sur state from 2006 to 2012. (2018-02-16)

New method for quantifying methane emissions from manure management
The EU Commision requires Denmark to reduce drastically emissions of greenhouse gases from agriculture. But it is currently not possible to quantify emissions of methane from livestock manure -- and to document effects of changes in management. A new research article addresses this challenge and proposes a method which could be an important step towards quantifying methane emissions. (2016-08-17)

Algorithm could streamline harvesting of hand-picked crops
Richard Sowers, a professor of industrial and enterprise systems engineering and mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a team of students have developed an algorithm that promises to give valuable information to farmers of crops picked by hand. (2018-03-13)

Millennials are not adequately saving for retirement, MU study finds
In a new study, researchers from the University of Missouri found that only 37.2 percent of working millennials have retirement accounts, demonstrating a need for increased financial education for retirement. This study is among the first to examine the state of millennials' retirement savings. (2018-03-05)

Conventional plowing is 'skinning our agricultural fields'
Traditional plow-based agricultural methods and the need to feed a rapidly growing world population are combining to deplete the Earth's soil supply, a new study confirms. (2007-08-08)

Northern European population history revealed by ancient human genomes
An international team of scientists, led by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, analyzed ancient human genomes from 38 northern Europeans dating from approximately 7,500 to 500 BCE. The study, published today in Nature Communications, found that Scandinavia was initially settled via a southern and a northern route and that the arrival of agriculture in northern Europe was facilitated by movements of farmers and pastoralists into the region. (2018-01-30)

In California, large-scale water cycles impact quakes a little
In California, seasonal changes in large-scale water cycles modestly influence small-scale quake activity, a new study reports. (2017-06-15)

One species described multiple times: How taxonomists contribute to biodiversity discovery
While working on a rare little known group of Oriental wasps that likely parasitize the eggs of grasshoppers, locusts or crickets, not only did a team of four entomologists discover four previously unknown species, but they also found that another four species were in fact one and the same. Their study, published in the open-access journal Zookeys, is a fine example for the important role played by taxonomists in puzzling out the Earth's biodiversity. (2018-03-29)

Land restoration in Ethiopia pays off but climate change necessitates many strategies
In the last decade, Ethiopia has invested more than US$1.2 billion annually in restoring landscapes in several regions of the country. Research led by the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) takes stock of Ethiopia's major restoration projects and investigates their impact on ecosystem services. Researchers say their work can help policymakers tailor future restoration actions to specific ecosystem needs. (2019-10-30)

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