Popular Aids News and Current Events

Popular Aids News and Current Events, Aids News Articles.
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Autism and theory of mind
Theory of mind, or the ability to represent other people's minds as distinct from one's own, can be difficult for people with autism. A new test provides researchers with a better understanding of the source of this difficulty. (2019-01-25)

UTSA researchers explore little-known, deadly fungal infections
A new study by Althea Campuzano, Ph.D., a student at the University of Texas at San Antonio, and Floyd Wormley, Jr., Professor of Biology and Senior Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies, sheds light on little-known fungal infections caused by the fungus Cryptococcus. There are currently no vaccines available for any fungal infection, which can be extremely deadly to patients under treatment for diseases like HIV, AIDS and cancer. (2018-04-10)

Considerable gap exists in US between having hearing loss and receiving medical evaluation treatment
Nearly a third of about 40 million adults in the United States who report hearing difficulties have not seen a specialist for their hearing problems. (2017-11-22)

Multiple dosing of long-acting rilpivirine in a model of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis
A long-acting antiretroviral agent such as rilpivirine could further improve pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), already shown to be safe and effective at preventing AIDS in high risk populations, as it could overcome problems with poor medication adherence. (2019-07-25)

African-Americans still disproportionately affected by HIV
African-Americans are still much more likely to be diagnosed with HIV than white Americans. A new paper on the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the African-American community shows that despite recent drops in HIV diagnoses across every population in the US, there are still great disparities between ethnic groups. The paper was led by Cato T. Laurencin of the University of Connecticut in the US and is published in Springer's Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities. (2018-06-05)

Defective HIV proviruses reduce effective immune system response, interfere with HIV cure
A new study finds defective HIV proviruses, long thought to be harmless, produce viral proteins and distract the immune system from killing intact proviruses needed to reduce the HIV reservoir and cure HIV. The study was published by researchers at the George Washington University and Johns Hopkins University in Cell Host & Microbe. (2017-04-19)

1 in 7 people living with HIV in the EU/EEA are not aware of their HIV status
Almost 30,000 newly diagnosed HIV infections were reported by the 31 European Union and European Economic Area (EU/EEA) countries in 2015, according to data published today by ECDC and the WHO Regional Office for Europe. This is similar to the observed notification trends in the last decade. One reason for this persistent HIV epidemic: ECDC estimates that currently around 122,000 people living with HIV across the region are unaware of their infection. (2016-11-29)

Social determinants of health linked to HIV mortality rates
People who are living with HIV in Ontario have access to good health care and medications, yet they are still dying younger and at substantially higher rates than the rest of the population, according to a new study published today. (2018-03-19)

Computerized writing aids make writing easier for persons with aphasia
It is possible to improve writing skills for those with aphasia with the aid of computerised writing aids. This is the conclusion of a doctoral thesis from the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. (2009-02-03)

Patients diagnosed late with HIV infection are more likely to transmit HIV to others
An estimated 1.2 million people live with HIV in the United States, with nearly 13 percent being unaware of their infection. New research by Brandon Brown in the School of Medicine at the University of California, Riverside and colleagues has found that patients diagnosed late in the course of HIV infection are more likely to transmit HIV to others. Further, these patients are at an increased risk of negative health outcomes and opportunistic infections. (2016-10-06)

Hearing and visual aids linked to slower age-related memory loss
Hearing aids and cataract surgery are strongly linked to a slower rate of age-related cognitive decline, according to new research by University of Manchester academics. According to Dr. Piers Dawes and Dr. Asri Maharani, cognitive decline -- which affects memory and thinking skills -- is slowed after patient's hearing and sight are improved. (2018-10-11)

Johns Hopkins researchers examine testosterone use to increase BMD in HIV-infected men
A new study has shown that HIV-infected men had lower median bone mineral density (BMD) scores at the hip compared to HIV-uninfected men, and all men who received testosterone had significantly greater BMD scores at the lumbar spine. (2018-12-12)

'Good bacteria' in women give clues for slowing HIV transmission
Beneficial bacteria found in healthy women help to reduce the amount of vaginal HIV among HIV-infected women and might make it more difficult for the virus to spread, boosting the possibility that (2008-02-07)

HIV RNA expression inhibitors may restore immune function in HIV-infected individuals
Immune activation and inflammation persist in the majority of treated HIV-infected individuals and is associated with excess risk of mortality and morbidity. A new study by Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers suggests that use of HIV RNA expression inhibitors as adjunct therapy might diminish atypical inflammation and restore immune function in HIV-infected individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). (2018-08-27)

C-Path, CDISC develop therapeutic area standard to foster meaningful research for HIV
The Critical Path Institute (C-Path) and CDISC are pleased to announce the release of a global Therapeutic Area Standard that specifies how to structure commonly collected data and outcome measurements in clinical trials for HIV. The standard, released in the form of User Guide for data managers, statisticians, programmers and study managers, covers the areas of prevention, vaccines and treatment and is freely available on the CDISC website. (2019-04-16)

Kids with cochlear implants since infancy more likely to speak, not sign
Researchers from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago present further evidence that deaf children who received cochlear implants (implanted electronic hearing device) before 12 months of age learn to more rapidly understand spoken language and are more likely to develop spoken language as their exclusive form of communication. (2019-03-05)

Decline in deaths from most infectious diseases in US, large differences among counties
Deaths due to most infectious diseases decreased in the United States from 1980 to 2014, although there were large differences among counties. (2018-03-27)

UCLA study describes structure of herpes virus linked to Kaposi's sarcoma
UCLA team shows in the laboratory that an inhibitor can be developed to break down the herpes virus. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus, or KSHV, is one of two viruses known to cause cancer in humans. (2018-01-19)

State-of-the-art HIV drug could curb HIV transmission, improve survival in India
An HIV treatment regimen already widely used in North America and Europe would likely increase the life expectancy of people living with HIV in India by nearly three years and reduce the number of new HIV infections by 23 percent with minimal impact on the country's HIV/AIDS budget. (2018-04-30)

HIV-AIDS: Following your gut
Researchers find a way to reduce replication of the AIDS virus in the gastrointestinal tract. (2017-09-18)

HIV-1 kills immune cells in the gut that may never bounce back
Two new studies from Rockefeller University and the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center (ADARC) show that the immune cells in other body tissues may never rebound after HIV infection, suggesting the need for additional ways to monitor immune system health, and the need for hypervigilance as HIV-positive patients live into their forties, fifties, sixties and beyond. (2006-12-04)

HKU AIDS Institute invents universal antibody drug for HIV-1 prevention and immunotherapy
A research team led by scientists at AIDS Institute and Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine of The University of Hong Kong (HKU) invents a universal antibody drug against HIV/AIDS. By engineering a tandem bi-specific broadly neutralizing antibody, (2018-05-07)

Study reveals how HIV infection may contribute to metabolic conditions
A single viral factor released from HIV-infected cells may wreak havoc on the body and lead to the development of metabolic diseases. By explaining the mechanisms, it could pave the way for targeted treatment to help provide a longer and healthier life for the 36 million people globally living with HIV/AIDS. (2019-07-25)

Study: Hispanic Americans across ethnicities want HIV testing in Spanish
New University at Buffalo research that investigated the language preferences of Hispanic Americans seeking HIV testing in New York found that the majority of Hispanic patients preferred to receive care in Spanish, even if they were fluent in English. (2018-03-14)

Study examines trends in infectious disease mortality in US
In a study appearing in the Nov. 22/29 issue of JAMA, Heidi E. Brown, Ph.D., of the University of Arizona, Tucson, and colleagues investigated trends in infectious disease mortality in the United States from 1980 through 2014. (2016-11-22)

Comprehensive AIDS prevention programs in prisons: A review study
In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health (Volume 6, Number 4, 2018; DOI: https://doi.org/10.15212/FMCH.2018.0118: , Somayeh Zare et al. discuss how studies show that suitable design of educational programs can affect prisoners' awareness of AIDS. (2019-01-04)

Exploring the connection between hearing loss and cognitive decline
A new study led by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital adds to a growing body of evidence that hearing loss is associated with higher risk of cognitive decline. (2019-01-29)

Most HIV transmission for men and women in Africa is within marriage or cohabitation
Since most heterosexual HIV transmission for both men and women in urban Zambia and Rwanda takes place within marriage or cohabitation, counseling and testing for couples should be promoted, as should other evidence-based interventions that target heterosexual couples. These are the conclusions of authors of an article in this week's edition of the Lancet. (2008-06-26)

Rapid HIV testing in the ER boosts diagnoses, screening
One in every 50 people screened for a suspected sexually transmitted infection in the Emergency Department at Henry Ford Hospital was found to be infected with HIV using a rapid blood sample screening test. (2008-10-25)

HIV-1 regulation via protective human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes
HIV-1 regulation by the HLA-B*52:01 allele has been established for some time. However, evidence of regulation by its companion, the HLA-C*12:02 allele, has been difficult to produce due to the strong linkage. Researchers from the Center for AIDS research in Kumamoto University, Japan have produced the first evidence of HLA-C's control of HIV-1, but they note that it comes with a price. Namely, the possibility of a different autoimmune disease. (2017-12-12)

Low use of hearing aids among older Hispanic/Latino adults in US
This study examined how common hearing aids were and the factors associated with their use among a group of nearly 1,900 adults (average age 60) of Hispanic/Latino backgrounds with hearing loss. The results reveal low use of hearing aids, with only 87 adults (4.6 percent) reporting use. (2019-04-18)

Three decades of responding to infectious disease outbreaks
In 1984, Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, testified before Congress showing a world map annotated with a single emerging infectious disease threat, HIV/AIDS. Since then, numerous diseases and pathogens were added, providing a powerful visual reminder of infectious diseases around the globe. In an essay in Annals of Internal Medicine, Dr. Fauci reflects on the efforts to address infectious disease outbreaks of the past three decades. (2017-11-14)

Mobile health has power to transform HIV/AIDS nursing
The abundance of personal smartphones in southern African countries got University of Washington professor Sarah Gimbel thinking: What if these phones were used by front-line health workers -- namely nurses -- to collect and analyze data on patients living with HIV or AIDS to improve their care? (2018-11-21)

CDC researchers examine HIV-related stigma among US healthcare providers
A Systemic Review from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention analyzed studies of HIV-related stigma among healthcare provider and identified three main themes: attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors; quality of patient care; and education and training. The CDC researchers found that factors associated with HIV-related stigma varied by gender, race, category of provider, and type of clinical setting. (2018-10-09)

New research highlights why HIV-infected patients suffer higher rates of cancer
AIDS patients suffer higher rates of cancer because they have fewer T-cells in their bodies to fight disease. But new research examines why HIV-infected patients have higher rates of cancer--among the leading causes of death among that population--than the general population. (2018-12-05)

The opioid crisis: What we should learn from the AIDS epidemic
There are important lessons to be learned from the successes and failures of the AIDS response that could inform our response to the opioid epidemic. Decades of HIV research have demonstrated that the existence of an effective biomedical treatment is rarely, in and of itself, sufficient to combat an epidemic, suggesting that both a social as well as a biomedical response to the opioid crisis are necessary in order to be effective. (2019-01-03)

First long-term study finds half trillion dollars spent on HIV/AIDS
Spending on HIV/AIDS globally between 2000 and 2015 totaled more than half a trillion dollars, according to a new scientific study, the first comprehensive analysis of funding for the disease. (2018-04-17)

Timothy Ray Brown, cured of HIV, rallies public to support research funding
In the 10th anniversary year since a bone marrow stem cell transplant cured Timothy Ray Brown of his HIV infection, despite disappointment over decreasing public desire to find a cure for HIV, Timothy Ray Brown remains optimistic that the scientific and medical communities can and will achieve this if properly funded. (2018-01-17)

Progress toward an HIV cure in annual special issue of AIDS Research & Human Retroviruses
Researchers have shown that despite effective combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), HIV can hide in the spleen of patients with no detectable HIV in their blood. (2018-01-25)

Now entering 'the valley of death'
Amid Trump comments and stock dive, let WUSTL expert in drug research and development Michael Kinch walk you through pharma 'Valley of Death.' (2017-01-12)

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