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Popular Algorithms News and Current Events, Algorithms News Articles.
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Measuring AI's ability to learn is difficult
Organizations looking to benefit from the artificial intelligence (AI) revolution should be cautious about putting all their eggs in one basket, a study from the University of Waterloo has found. (2019-01-17)
Can AI spot liars?
Though algorithms are increasingly being deployed in all facets of life, a new USC study has found that they fail basic tests as truth detectors. (2019-09-04)
The efficiency of nature-inspired metaheuristics in limited-budget expensive global optimization
Global optimization problems where evaluation of the objective function is an expensive operation arise frequently in engineering, machine learning, decision making, statistics, optimal control, etc. (2018-03-22)
A turbo engine for tracing neurons
Putting a turbo engine into an old car gives it an entirely new life -- suddenly it can go further, faster. (2017-04-27)
IBM-EPFL-NJIT team demonstrates novel synaptic architecture for brain inspired computing
Two New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) researchers, working with collaborators from the IBM Research Zurich Laboratory and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, have demonstrated a novel synaptic architecture that could lead to a new class of information processing systems inspired by the brain. (2018-07-10)
Why bees soared and slime flopped as inspirations for systems engineering
Honeybees gathering nectar inspired an algorithm that eased the burden of host servers handling unpredictable traffic by about 25 percent. (2018-02-18)
Surrey AI predicts cancer patients' symptoms
Doctors could get a head start treating cancer thanks to new AI developed at the University of Surrey that is able to predict symptoms and their severity throughout the course of a patient's treatment. (2019-01-02)
Researchers bring high res magnetic resonance imaging to nanometer scale
A new technique that brings magnetic resonance imaging to the nanometer scale with unprecedented resolution will open the door for major advances in understanding new materials, virus particles and proteins that cause diseases like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. (2018-02-21)
A new tool for forecasting the behavior of the microbiome
A team of investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and the University of Massachusetts have developed a suite of computer algorithms that can accurately predict the behavior of the microbiome -- the vast collection of microbes living on and inside the human body. (2016-06-27)
'Breakthrough' algorithm exponentially faster than any previous one
Computer scientists at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a completely new kind of algorithm, one that exponentially speeds up computation by dramatically reducing the number of parallel steps required to reach a solution. (2018-06-28)
An algorithm that knows when you'll get bored with your favorite mobile game
Researchers from the Tokyo-based company Silicon Studio, led by Spanish data scientist África Periáñez, have developed a new algorithm that predicts when a user will leave a mobile game. (2017-03-23)
MRI analysis with machine learning predicts impairment after spinal injury, study shows
A test of machine-learning algorithms shows promise for computer-aided prognosis of acute spinal cord injury, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2018 Annual Meeting, set for April 22-27 in Washington, D.C. (2018-04-05)
A game changer: Metagenomic clustering powered by supercomputers
Berkeley Lab and Joint Genome Institute researchers took one of the most popular clustering approaches in modern biology -- Markov Clustering algorithm -- and modified it to run efficiently and at scale on supercomputers. (2018-03-12)
Speedy collision detector could make robots better human assistants
A faster collision detection algorithm could enable robots to work more fluidly in the operating room or at home for assisted living. (2017-11-14)
Finding patterns in corrupted data
A new 'robust' statistical method from MIT enables efficient model fitting with corrupted, high-dimensional data. (2016-10-26)
Artificial intelligence helps soldiers learn many times faster in combat
New technology allows US soldiers to learn 13 times faster than conventional methods and Army researchers said this may help save lives. (2018-04-27)
Using computers to detect breast cancer
Jeffrey Golden, MD, comments on new research exploring the use of computer algorithms in detecting the spread of breast cancer to lymph nodes. (2017-12-12)
Suicide prevention: Reacting to the tell-tale signs
Can search engines save lives? Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers are working on an approach which would enable search engines to more effectively identify users who are at risk of suicide and provide them with information on where to find help. (2016-10-25)
Findings show potential use of artificial intelligence in detecting spread of breast cancer
Computer algorithms detected the spread of cancer to lymph nodes in women with breast cancer as well as or better than pathologists. (2017-12-12)
Does my algorithm work? There's no shortcut for community detection
Community detection is an important tool for scientists studying networks, but a new paper published in Science Advances calls into question the common practice of using metadata for ground truth validation. (2017-05-03)
New software can detect when people text and drive
Computer algorithms developed by engineering researchers at the University of Waterloo can accurately determine when drivers are texting or engaged in other distracting activities. (2017-09-08)
Artificial intelligence enters the nutraceutical industry
Life Extension (LE) launched a new line of nutraceuticals called GEROPROTECTTM, and the first product in the series called Ageless Cell combines some of the natural compounds that were shortlisted by Insilico Medicine's algorithms and are generally recognized as safe (GRAS). (2017-03-01)
Going the distance: Brain cells for 3D vision discovered
Scientists at Newcastle University have discovered neurons in insect brains that compute 3D distance and direction. (2019-06-28)
Computers can take social media data and make marketing personas
Computers may be able to group consumers into marketing segments in real time just by observing how they respond to online videos and other social media data, according to a team of researchers. (2016-12-14)
An index measures similarity between cancer cells and pluripotent stem cells
The new methodology measures tumor aggressiveness and the risk of relapse, helping doctors plan treatment, according to Brazilian scientists authors of a paper published in a special issue of the journal Cell. (2018-04-05)
Can artificial intelligence be used to study gut microbes in patients?
A new Journal of Internal Medicine article proposes that artificial intelligence tools, such as machine learning algorithms, have the potential for building predictive models for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases linked to imbalances in gut microbial communities, or microbiota. (2018-03-21)
Can we imitate organisms' abilities to decode water patterns for new technologies?
The shape of water. Can it tell us about what drives romance? (2018-04-05)
Tactile sensor gives robots new capabilities
Eight years ago, Ted Adelson's research group at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) unveiled a new sensor technology, called GelSight, that uses physical contact with an object to provide a remarkably detailed 3-D map of its surface. (2017-06-05)
Nature-inspired crystal structure predictor
Scientists from Russia found a way of improving the crystal structure prediction algorithms, making the discovery of new compounds multiple times faster. (2018-11-09)
Lobachevsky University scientists in search of fast algorithms for discrete optimization
Lobachevsky University scientists are implementing a research project (2017-12-01)
Commercial software no more accurate than untrained people in predicting recidivism
A new study suggests that a commercial software widely used to predict which criminals will commit crimes again is no more accurate than untrained people, at foreseeing recidivism. (2018-01-17)
AI researchers design 'privacy filter' for your photos
As concerns over privacy and data security on social networks grow, U of T Engineering researchers led by Professor Parham Aarabi and graduate student Avishek Bose have created an algorithm to dynamically disrupt facial recognition systems. (2018-05-31)
Origin Quantum Company and LQCC have successfully simulated a 64-qubit circuit
Origin Quantum Company cooperates with the team of Prof. Guang-Can Guo from the CAS Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, USTC (LQCC). (2018-06-22)
Field-data study finds no evidence of racial bias in predictive policing
While predictive policing aims to improve the effectiveness of police patrols, there is concern that these algorithms may lead police to target minority communities and result in discriminatory arrests. (2018-03-13)
Artificial intelligence accelerates discovery of metallic glass
Combining artificial intelligence with experimentation sped up the discovery of metallic glass by 200 times. (2018-04-13)
How social networking sites may discriminate against women
Using the photo-sharing site Instagram as a test case, Columbia researchers demonstrate how two common recommendation algorithms amplify a network effect known as homophily in which similar or like-minded people cluster together. (2018-04-20)
Detecting autism in infants before symptoms emerge
According to the results of a new study, a brain scan can detect functional changes in babies as young as six months of age that predicts later diagnosis with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). (2017-06-07)
New tool predicts risk of plant disease and infestation worldwide
Researchers in Mexico have developed a technique to predict the risk of disease or infestation in plants. (2017-10-30)
Immune system simulation shows need for multi-target treatments for sepsis
Using a computational model of the human immune system, scientists have shown that efforts to combat sepsis might be more effective if they targeted multiple steps in the molecular processes that drive the illness. (2018-02-15)
Artificial intelligence controls robotic arm to pack boxes and cut costs
Rutgers computer scientists used artificial intelligence to control a robotic arm that provides a more efficient way to pack boxes, saving businesses time and money. (2019-06-27)
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